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Comparative Studies in Governance
This series makes available scholarship that helps us to understand the changing balances between centres of power and the territories under their domination. It takes as a starting point the notion that domination is frequently achieved through conquest and coercion, but is rarely maintained exclusively by such means. The empires as well as the composite states of the pre-modern world always depended to some extent on the integration and cooperation of regional elites. The relationship between rulers and elites took shape in the centre as well as in the regions. At the heart of the dynastic state, rulers found themselves surrounded by a variety of state servants, ranging from personal attendants to advisers, priests, administrators and soldiers. How were such staffs recruited, and how did rulers attempt to secure their lasting loyalty? In addition to the social and institutional intricacies of the ruler’s environment, we invite studies about the architectural and cultural make-up, comparing the layout of palaces, rules for access, and the ritual, artistic, as well as scholarly forms underpinning dynastic legitimacy. Going from the centre to the regions, how did armies, administrators, church and religion, law and justice operate? Were such institutions and practices strongly centralized and filled with rulers’ nominees, or closer to regional elites in personnel and mentality? Was the culture of regional elites oriented strongly towards the standards of the centre? Which forms of contact and representation evolved? To what extent, finally, did the population participate in the practices and rituals of rulership?
These themes and questions offer a framework for comparison which this series will pursue, ideally by publishing work that is in itself comparative, but also by publishing studies focusing on a single region while fitting into the general framework. An initial focus on the early modern Eurasian world leaves open extensions in time and space relevant for the theme.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/ or full manuscripts to either the series editor, Jeroen Duindam, or the publisher, Arjan van Dijk at Brill, P.O. Box 9000, 2300 PA Leiden, The Netherlands.



Studies in Central European Histories is a peer-reviewed book series that presents original work and translations of the histories of the German-speaking and closely related peoples of Central Europe between the Middle Ages and the present. It aims to bring forward new and neglected perspectives on important subjects and issues in the histories of these peoples. The series is designed for advanced students and scholars of German and European history in the early modern and modern periods.

General Editors: David M. Luebke and Celia Applegate.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.