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Editor: Walter Melion
CLICK HERE for direct access to volumes 1 - 50



Art history has absorbed theories and methods from other disciplines such as history, philosophy, anthropology, and, more recently, film and gender studies; conversely, it has had an impact on these and other disciplines, its relevance confirmed by the visual turn newly evident throughout the humanities. The history of art history itself reflects trends in intellectual history, and the art historian's intellectual and cultural formation determines what counts as an art historical object, and how such objects are theorized and interpreted. The interpretation of a work of art must therefore activate the self-reflexive capacity of art historical inquiry. Brill’s Studies on Art, Art History, and Intellectual History (BSAI) is dedicated to the study of historical and contemporary works of art, in ways that reflect on the history of art, its theories and methods, and its relation to the cultural milieux in which art historians operate. Volumes 1-50 have been published as a subseries of Brill's Studies in Intellectual History (BSIH, ISSN 0920-8607). Starting with volume 51, BSAI is a separate book series. The series' editor-in-chief is Professor Walter S. Melion (Emory University).

Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions
Series Editor: George C.X. Wei
The era of globalization has witnessed increasing activities across border and interactions between nations, especially between the East and the West. East and West: Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions aims to trace and investigate multiple-dimensional interactions between the East and the West from the Age of Sail to the Modern Era, culturally, socially, economically and diplomatically, with a focus on maritime history via and centered on port cities such as Macao, Goa, Melaka, Nagasaki in the East and their counterparts such as Lisbon, Seville, Amsterdam, London in the West. The series examines matters about empires, oceans, and human connections through changes in material lives and cultural politics, and analyzes the impact of the flow of cultural materials across oceans, such as artifacts, arts, goods, foods, books, knowledge, beliefs, etc., on port cities and urbanization. Particularly, it will provide readers with a new maritime vision of the East and Southeast Asian history of connections at the eastern end of the Maritime Silk Road, including the ports of East Indian Ocean and South China Sea: places from Nagasaki to Xiamen/Macao, from Singapore to Shanghai, from Hong Kong to Melbourne, etc. In doing so, it will unfold the process of formation and transformation of networks and fluxing space, generated or altered by trade, migrations, diplomacies, regional conglomerations, etc., illustrate the glocolization of religions, examine the relationship of culture/tradition and diplomatic strategy, and demonstrate the causes to miscommunication, misunderstanding, conflicts and confrontations between nations as well as appropriate reading, understanding and interpreting of each other.
East and West will include studies in such disciplines and area studies as maritime history, missionary history, intellectual history, international relations, arts, architecture, music, religious studies, and cultural studies. This series will feature monographs and edited volumes as well as translated works. It will be of interest to academics as well as general readers, including historians, artists, architects, diplomats, politicians, journalists, travelers, religious groups, businessmen, lawyers, among other groups.
Series Editor: Gernot Wimmer
This book series takes an interdisciplinary approach, examining the literature of modernity through consideration of its diverse phenomena and contexts.
While the Early Modern Era was marked in cultural-historical terms by the Renaissance, economically by the Industrial Revolution and politically by the French Revolution as well as nationalism, a first high point in modern literature was achieved by insights drawn from the natural and human sciences, foremost the fields of psychoanalysis, the quantum hypothesis, and the theory of relativity. A necessary condition for the interdisciplinary approach, therefore, in addition to the consideration of socio-cultural implications, is engagement with the history of thought, which makes the development of the Modern Era comprehensible.
This premise provides the basis for the examination of the numerous phenomena of modernity through the lens of literary texts, stemming from all applicable national literatures.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
The Brill series Emergence of Natural History (ENH) features books that examine the historic attitude of humans towards nature as an object of study, and the development of the field of knowledge we now know as natural history. Observing, collecting and explaining the diversity of nature has been important throughout history. This series addresses the many faces of natural history from the classical age up to the early nineteenth century. It is particularly designed to include volumes on the lives, work and networks of people whose contributions have proven foundational, but who have been overshadowed by more well-known figures such as Linnaeus and Darwin. Volumes encompass the global and cultural history of natural history, explore the role played by practitioners such as traveling naturalists, collectors, artists, and bring attention to indigenous, visual, and manuscript sources.

Books may be scholarly monographs or edited works, but we also welcome well-researched exhibition catalogues or primary source editions with comprehensive introductions. Contributions that address underexplored figures, themes, and (visual) sources from an interdisciplinary and historical perspective are particularly encouraged.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Stefan Einarson or to one of the series editors Aaron M. Bauer (Villanova University, PA, USA), Kay Etheridge (Gettysburg College, PA, USA), Dominik Hünniger (University of Hamburg, DE), Andreas Weber, (University of Twente, NL).
For information on how to submit a book proposal, please consult the Brill Author Guide.
Machiavellian Studies
The peer-reviewed book series Thinking in Extremes: Machiavellian Studies has a double aim. First, it aims to become the international reference for Machiavellian studies, the site where the main critical traditions (Anglo-American, French, and Italian) can not only meet but also interact and reciprocally influence each other. Second, the series aims to establish a new methodological approach to the study of Machiavelli and, more generally, early modern political thought: a methodology grounded on the trans-disciplinary – and probably anti-disciplinary – dimension of his thought. This fundamental characteristic is not sufficiently clear in the field that is still divided between the image of Machiavelli as a ‘pure scholar,’ and reader of ancient manuscripts versus the image of Machiavelli as a ‘pure politician,’ almost ignorant of political philosophy and barely capable of repeating someone else’s opinion. The fact that Machiavelli was an active and practical politician is too often considered as an handicap. In fact, because of his cultural background and his social origin, Machiavelli opens up the possibility of a new original intellectual approach, in which theory and practice, culture and politics cannot be separated. For this reason, the study of his thought can be carried on only by intertwining multiple codes and languages and by recognizing the positive dimensions of his multiplicity of approaches.
Editor: Jorge Ledo
Editorial Board / Council Member: Harm den Boer
This new series publishes high quality philological editions of a selected number of influential works or authors forbidden by the Iberian Inquisition, or challenging the idea of an Imperial Spain/Portugal. The volumes are all accompanied by studies by leading scholars in the field. An important criterion for inclusion in the series is that the chosen text is either unpublished or does not have a modern, scholarly edition. As such, the series presents a highly innovative content. The series will reflect the cultural and intellectual production of all Iberian authors, Jewish and Morisco authors, but also of reformers and/or Catholic authors who challenged prevalent religious, political, or literary discourse.

The series has published one volume since 2014.
The first online collection of Brill’s flagship series in intellectual history ( Brill’s Studies in Intellectual History) presents new approaches to history, the history of philosophy and theology, and the history of ideas. Special attention is given to the use of interdisciplinary methods and insights, such as those of cultural anthropology, semiotics and linguistic analysis. Occasionally volumes contain papers of eminent scholars and proceedings of conferences, which would otherwise be difficult to obtain. Includes the subseries Brill's Studies in Art, Art History and Intellectual History and Brill's Texts and Sources in Intellectual History.
Texts and Studies Series
Editor: David Marsh
This peer-reviewed series has as its focus the authors and the Latin and vernacular literatures of late medieval and early modern Europe (ca. thirteenth through seventeenth centuries), including those less common literatures that arose within the European cultural sphere. The series publishes editions of primary sources, translations in combination with critical editions, and reference works of enduring value.
Time, Astronomy, and Calendars: Texts and Studies brings together the fields of astronomy, astrology, calendars, chronology, and time reckoning, from Antiquity to the early modern period. These closely interrelated fields transcended ethnic, linguistic, and religious boundaries, especially in the medieval and early modern periods. This explains the importance of a single series covering the works of pagan, Christian, Islamic, Jewish, and other authors, written in languages including Greek, Latin, Arabic, Hebrew, and others. This series will focus on the Near East, Mediterranean, and Europe, but will not exclude contributions on astronomy, the calendar, and related fields from other parts of the world within the same time period.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
Past, present and future of knowledge inscription
Brill’s Scholarly Communication offers a new venue for original studies into the mutual shaping of reading, writing and scholarship in the past, present and future. It also welcomes manuscripts that interrogate this mutual shaping with respect to science. The series aims to bring together insights into the literate nature of scholarship and scholarly activity from across the entire spectrum of social sciences and humanities disciplines, emphasizing work aimed at understanding change in reading, writing and scholarship. The focus in this series is less on disciplinary specificities than it is on topical and imaginative contributions to scholarly literacy in the widest sense. English is presupposed.