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The Handbook of Sufi Studies (HSUF) series serves as the principal reference tool for the field of Sufi studies and an essential forum for theoretically and methodologically sophisticated discussions of the major themes and research methods related to this field.

The goal of HSUF is not just to describe and summarize the findings of the previous scholarship on Sufism but also to engage critically with it and to offer new ways to approach it. Special attention is paid to the applicability to Sufi studies of methodological tools developed by sociology, cultural anthropology, subaltern and gender studies, religious studies, literary theory and discourse analysis.

Each volume of the series consists of a general introduction by the editor(s) followed by several general analytic essays on the topics at hand. Each analytical essay, in its turn, introduces several sub-chapters focusing on a particular issue within the overall thematic scope of the chapter. Written by major experts on Sufism, the Handbook of Sufi Studies (HSUF) series is meant to be a standard reference for both specialists in Islamic and religious studies and non-specialists interested in a balanced and academically rigorous discussion of Sufism.
The series Basic Texts of Islamic Mysticism intends to publish important texts of Islamic mysticism both from the early and classical periods, as well as from more recent times. The texts will be presented in translation with scholarly commentaries.
The Handbook of Sufi Studies (HSUF) series serves as the principal reference tool for the field of Sufi studies and an essential forum for theoretically and methodologically sophisticated discussions of the major themes and research methods related to this field.

The goal of HSUF is not just to describe and summarize the findings of the previous scholarship on Sufism but also to engage critically with it and to offer new ways to approach it. Special attention is paid to the applicability to Sufi studies of methodological tools developed by sociology, cultural anthropology, subaltern and gender studies, religious studies, literary theory and discourse analysis.

Each volume of the series consists of a general introduction by the editor(s) followed by several general analytic essays on the topics at hand. Each analytical essay, in its turn, introduces several sub-chapters focusing on a particular issue within the overall thematic scope of the chapter. Written by major experts on Sufism, the Handbook of Sufi Studies (HSUF) series is meant to be a standard reference for both specialists in Islamic and religious studies and non-specialists interested in a balanced and academically rigorous discussion of Sufism.
This is an unabridged, annotated, translation of the great Damascene savant and saint Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya’s (d. 751/1350) Madārij al-Sālikīn. Conceived as a critical commentary on an earlier Sufi classic by the great Hanbalite scholar Abū Ismāʿīl of Herat, Madārij aims to rejuvenate Sufism’s Qurʾanic foundations. The original work was a key text for the Sufi initiates, composed in terse, rhyming prose as a master’s instruction to the aspiring seeker on the path to God, in a journey of a hundred stations whose ultimate purpose was to be lost to one’s self ( fanāʾ) and subsist ( baqāʾ) in God. The translator, Ovamir (ʿUwaymir) Anjum, provides an extensive introduction and annotation to this English-Arabic face-to-face presentation of this masterpiece of Islamic psychology.
This is an unabridged, annotated, translation of the great Damascene savant and saint Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya’s (d. 751/1350) Madārij al-Sālikīn. Conceived as a critical commentary on an earlier Sufi classic by the great Hanbalite scholar Abū Ismāʿīl of Herat, Madārij aims to rejuvenate Sufism’s Qurʾanic foundations. The original work was a key text for the Sufi initiates, composed in terse, rhyming prose as a master’s instruction to the aspiring seeker on the path to God, in a journey of a hundred stations whose ultimate purpose was to be lost to one’s self ( fanāʾ) and subsist ( baqāʾ) in God. The translator, Ovamir (ʿUwaymir) Anjum, provides an extensive introduction and annotation to this English-Arabic face-to-face presentation of this masterpiece of Islamic psychology.
Studies on Sufism provides a forum for original scholarship on Sufism as situated within all of its temporal, geographical, linguistic, cultural and intellectual contexts. The series is open to all disciplinary perspectives and relevant topics of inquiry and publishes monographic studies, edited volumes, and critical editions and translations of texts. Contributions are welcome in English, French or German.