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Brill Open Humanities

An International Journal

Editor-in-Chief Rens Bod

This journal was announced but will not publish.
Lithuanian Historical Studies (LHS) is an academic peer-reviewed English-language periodical journal, published annually by the Lithuanian Institute of History. Its aim is to progress and disseminate historical research on Central and Eastern Europe, with special focus on Lithuania and the neighbouring states. Even though most of the published studies cover political, social, religious, economic and cultural topics, yet the journal welcomes submission of innovative and multidisciplinary research. Besides the scientific articles, the LHS also publishes new or little-known source material, book reviews and notices, abstracts of the defended dissertations in history in Lithuania, and other relevant material. All submissions undergo a rigorous peer review process, based on double-blind refereeing by a minimum of two specialist referees. The accepted articles that were submitted in Lithuanian are translated into English at the journal’s expense.

China and Asia

A Journal in Historical Studies

Editor-in-Chief Xiaorong Han and Liam Kelley

Individuals are eligible for free access to China and Asia until 31 December 2019, using access token CAHS4U.

China and Asia: A Journal in Historical Studies (CAHS) is a peer-reviewed English-language forum for historical research on relations between China and other regions of Asia during both the pre-modern and modern periods. Its purpose is to promote communication and exchange among the global Asian studies community, especially among scholars based in Asian countries. CAHS publishes manuscripts focusing on the political, economic, social and cultural interactions between China and other parts of Asia, as well as studies covering a broader geographic area with Asia as a central part. The journal welcomes contributions representing diverse perspectives, and will give special attention to submissions from emerging scholars and scholars based in underrepresented regions. Occasionally, CAHS will publish special issues on selected topics. Colleagues who are interested in organizing and editing special issues should contact the editors directly.

China and Asia also publishes reviews of books relevant to the themes of the journal. Colleagues and scholars who want to recommend books for review or write reviews for the journal should contact our book review editors.

Diplomatica

A Journal of Diplomacy and Society

Editor-in-Chief Giles Scott-Smith and Kenneth Weisbrode

Individuals are eligible for free access to Diplomatica until 31 December 2020, using access token DIPL4U. Click here for more information.

Open the "Media" section below under the "About" tab for multimedia related to Diplomatica.

Diplomatica: A Journal of Diplomacy and Society addresses the broad range of work being done across the social sciences and the humanities that takes diplomacy as its focus of investigation. The journal explores and investigates diplomacy as an extension of social interests, forces, and environments. It is multidisciplinary, providing a space to unite perspectives from diplomatic history (humanities) and diplomatic studies (social sciences) in particular. It is interdisciplinary, expanding beyond its disciplinary foundation of history to enrich historical perspectives with innovative analyses from other disciplines. It seeks to broaden the study of diplomacy temporally, contributing to a re-appraisal of diplomacy across the modern and early modern eras and beyond, in this way bridging temporal divides and introducing debate between scholars of different periodizations. It is determinedly global in orientation, providing a space for inter-regional comparisons. The journal is published in cooperation with the New Diplomatic History (NDH) Network.

Diplomatica seeks to merge diplomatic history and diplomatic studies through three main approaches:
1. Habitat: Exploring the multiple identities, behaviors, rituals, and belief systems of diplomats and how they change according to time, place, and space;
2. Actors: Challenging the centrality of the nation-state as the principal actor framing an understanding of what diplomacy is by focusing equally on the role of non-state actors;
3. Disciplines: Introducing appropriate methodologies from the social sciences, such as prosopography, network analysis, gender studies, economics, geography, and communications, in order to broaden the analytical study of diplomatic habitats, actors, and interactions through time.

Broadly speaking, Diplomatica covers the study of diplomatic process more than the study of diplomatic product. It questions, investigates, and explores all aspects of the diplomatic world, from interactions between the professionally diplomatic and the non-diplomatic to the arrangement of summits and banquets, the architecture of ministries and residences, and the identities, roles, practices, and networks of envoys, policy entrepreneurs, salonnières, and all other private and quasi-private individuals who affect the course of diplomacy.

The journal welcomes submissions dealing with any period and locale from across the humanities and social sciences. Submissions should be standard article length (approximately 8,000 words including footnotes) and written for a general, scholarly audience.

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the Diplomatica Editorial Office.

For book review queries, please contact the book review editor, Haakon Ikonomou.

The Mattingly Award
Brill, the editorial board of Diplomatica, and the New Diplomatic History Network are pleased to provide an annual award of €500 for excellence and originality in an essay on diplomatic society or culture, broadly defined. The Mattingly Award is named for the American historian, Garrett Mattingly (1900-62), an esteemed writer, scholar, and professor at Columbia University. Best known for his history of the Spanish Armada (1959), which won the Pulitzer Prize, and his biography of Catherine of Aragon (1941), Mattingly pioneered the study of diplomatic institutions, practices, norms, and personalities, notably in his classic history of early modern Europe, Renaissance Diplomacy (1955).

NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in Diplomatica can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

Edited by Katie Barclay, Andrew Lynch and Giovanni Tarantino

EHCS is dedicated to understanding the emotions as culturally and temporally-situated phenomena, and to exploring the role of emotion in shaping human experience and action by individuals, groups, societies and cultures.

EHCS welcomes theoretically-informed work from a range of historical, cultural and social domains. The journal aims to illuminate (1) the ways emotion is conceptualized and understood in different temporal or cultural settings, from antiquity to the present, and across the globe; (2) the impact of emotion on human action and in processes of change; and (3) the influence of emotional legacies from the past on current social, cultural and political practices.

EHCS is interested in multidisciplinary approaches (both qualitative and quantitative), from history, art, literature, languages, music, politics, sociology, cognitive sciences, cultural studies, environmental humanities, religious studies, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, and related disciplines. The journal also invites papers that interrogate the methodological and critical problems of exploring emotions in historical, cultural and social contexts, and the relation between past and present in the study of feelings, passions, sentiments, emotions and affects. Finally, Emotions also accepts theoretically-informed and reflective scholarship that explores how scholars access, uncover, construct and engage with emotions in their own scholarly practice.

Following an initial review process by the editors, EHCS sends acceptable submissions to two expert independent readers outside the author’s home institution, employing a double-blind review procedure.

EHCS is published on behalf of the Society for the History of Emotions.

Frankokratia

A Journal for the Study of Greek Lands under Latin Rule

Edited by Chris Schabel and Michalis Olympios

Frankokratia (Gr. Φραγκοκρατία, or ‘Frankish rule’) is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal committed to publishing original research on all areas of the Greek world where Latin (‘Roman Catholic’) populations from western Europe settled in the aftermath of the crusades. Collectively known as ‘Franks’ in the East irrespective of their exact place of origin, these settlers established shorter- or longer-lived polities on lands formerly belonging to the Byzantine Empire and inhabited by people of the Greek (‘Orthodox’) and various Eastern Christian rites, Jews and Muslims. Although the core focus of the journal lies on the regions conquered in the context of the Third and Fourth Crusades, to embrace the full breadth of this phenomenon the journal’s chronological and geographical scope ranges widely from the conquests of Southern Italy and Antioch in the eleventh century to the fall of the last Venetian colonies in the eighteenth century.

Frankokratia has been conceived as an interdisciplinary forum bringing together innovative work by specialists in archaeology, architecture, art, codicology, culture, diplomacy, economics, language, law, literature, musicology, numismatics, politics, religion, society, theology, war, and all related topics. Moreover, it aspires to bridge the perennial epistemological divide between western medieval and Byzantine studies and to overcome the mutual isolation of specialists on Greece, Cyprus, and other regions, offering a venue for the publication of collaborative research efforts and encouraging the fruitful cross-pollination between these and other fields. The journal welcomes the submission of both broader historiographical surveys and more focused studies, including essays presenting previously unpublished source material in the form of texts and images. This versatility in terms of content and methodology will allow Frankokratia to broach the multifaceted issues raised by the study of the complex societies of the Greco-Latin sphere in a more holistic fashion, helping weave a richer tapestry of the history and culture of the post-classical Mediterranean.
This journal has ceased publication from 2008.

Editor-in-Chief James I. Matray

The Journal of American-East Asian Relations is a peer-reviewed quarterly journal of interdisciplinary historical, cross-cultural, and social science scholarship from all parts of the world. The scope includes diplomatic, economic, security, and cultural relations, as well as Asian-American history. Geographical coverage includes the United States, Canada, other countries in the Americas, and East Asia, typically China, Japan, and Korea, but also the Pacific area, Australasia, Southeast Asia, and the Russian Far East.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.

Editor-in-Chief Harm Kaal and Jelle van Lottum

The Journal of Applied History (JOAH) is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed scholarly journal concerned with the application of historical knowledge and insights to current matters. As such it seeks to promote long-term thinking when considering the causes and implications of present affairs and issues.

The use of the concept of ‘applied history’ enables us to move away from the rather broad and diverse field of 'public history'. JOAH promotes interventions in contemporary policy making as well as in contemporary discussions about key social issues that are based on thorough historical research. We therefore do not aim at a broad and often ill-defined audience beyond academia, but on a rather well-defined public of professional (academic) historians, policy makers, civil servants and other professionals in think tanks, government agencies and (semi-)public authorities.

JOAH encourages contributions from specialists in all branches of the humanities and social sciences who adopt a historical approach: from historians and anthropologists, to political scientists and sociologists, and from experts in the history of antiquity to those working on the very recent past, thus bringing together long-term perspectives and various approaches and methodologies. The journal seeks to inform scholars and policy makers interested in connecting past and present through publishing relatively short articles of approximately 4,000 words.
From Volume 6 (2010), Journal of Conflict Archaeology is published by Maney.