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As of 2021, Brill Research Perspectives in Critical Theory is no longer published as a journal by Brill, but will continue as a book series. Brill Research Perspectives in Critical Theory offers a comprehensive reference resource for scholars and students working in the areas of philosophy, critical theory, aesthetics, cultural and literary theory, political and social theory. The journal provides in-depth scholarly articles on the main issues and figures in critical theory understood in its broadest terms. This includes the long historical legacy of critique from Rousseau, Kant, the Romantics, Hegel and Marx, through to Western Marxism and the Frankfurt School, as well as contemporary French Critical Theory, Feminist and Critical Race Theory.

The articles within the journal also examine important intersections between critical and political theory, aesthetics, cultural and literary theory. The resource covers and explains the most central terms and approaches to critical theory as well as important intellectual movements and influences. Each issue is fully peer-reviewed and referenced and provides the most up-to-date research in the area. The Brill Research Perspectives in Critical Theory is an invaluable resource for scholars wishing to draw on the latest research, as well as a dynamic resource for teaching and for students working in critical theories and related fields.

Research in Critical Marxist Theory
2022 Impact Factor: 0.6
5-Year Impact Factor: 0.7

Individuals are eligible for a 35% discount on subscriptions with action code 71697. Orders should be sent to customerservices@brill.com, mentioning the code, volume number, type of subscription, and address details.

Historical Materialism is an interdisciplinary journal dedicated to exploring and developing the critical and explanatory potential of Marxist theory. The journal started as a project at the London School of Economics from 1995 to 1998. The advisory editorial board comprises many leading Marxists, including Robert Brenner, Maurice Godelier, Michael Lebowitz, Justin Rosenberg and others.

Marxism has manifested itself in the late 1990s from the pages of the Financial Times to new work by Fredric Jameson, Terry Eagleton and David Harvey. Unburdened by pre-1989 ideological baggage, Historical Materialism stands at the edge of a vibrant intellectual current, publishing a new generation of Marxist thinkers and scholars.

2021 Impact Factor: 0.915
5-Year Impact Factor: 0.77

For questions please contact the Editors at info@historicalmaterialism.org.
Visit also the Historical Materialism Book Series page.
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Editor-in-Chief:
This is a Diamond Open Access journal. Articles are published in Open Access at no cost to the authors.

Innovation in the Social Sciences is a fully Open Access journal, which means that all articles are freely available online, ensuring maximum, worldwide dissemination of content. Open Access publication of the journal is supported by a subvention from National Sun Yat-sen University (Taiwan), and the Article Publication Charge for authors is therefore waived. For more information, see the BrillOpen dedicated webpage.

Innovation in the Social Sciences is an online-only, international, peer-reviewed journal that aims to publish research articles, perspectives, and concise reports of empirical studies that address real-world social problems (e.g., climate change, the pandemic and its impact, right-wing populism, political polarization, global inequality, population aging, democratic governance) with innovative perspectives grounded in solid social, cultural, political, and economic theories and practices. By aligning with growing trends of interdisciplinary research in the social sciences, the journal aims to integrate cross-field research results and various practical experiences to provide innovative solutions to social problems.

The journal is specifically interested in publishing research that examines the following topics:
• Political theory and political sociology of democratic innovations
• Design-thinking for social innovation
• Food sovereignty and community resilience
• Social and ecological resilience
• Social and solidarity economy
• Theories and practices of “real utopias”
• Economic and social empowerment
• Methodological triangulation techniques: integrating human knowledge with machine learning
• New methodological approaches in the social sciences
• Globalization in the post-COVID era: increasing antiglobalization and alterglobalization
• International relations in the post-COVID era
• Political economy in a new era of populist nationalism
• Political economy of: global society, global climate change, renewable energy, the semi-conductor industry, relocation of the global supply chain, global migration, pandemics, public health
• The evolution of global governance
• Geopolitical rivalries and global governance

Innovation in the Social Sciences aims to sustain and expand transdisciplinary research in the social sciences while promoting innovation in related fields. The core concept of “innovation” is employed in a double sense: First, the journal is designed to encourage research that examines important contemporary global and local social problems via innovative perspectives, approaches, and methods. Second, the journal welcomes research articles and case reports that not only feature local experiences (especially, but not limited to, social, cultural, political, and economic innovations in organizations, communities, cities, and regions) but also highlight their relevance to a broader context.

The journal provides a forum for international and interdisciplinary research offering innovative perspectives that challenge existing theories. The journal will prioritize articles that:
• present an advance in the social sciences.
• are methodologically rigorous and innovative.
• have wider theoretical, comparative, or practical significance.
• have policy implications, especially with regard to social, cultural, political, and economic innovations.
• diversify social scientific research with interdisciplinary studies.
• are written for a wide range of audiences and are accessible to the popular press and the public at large.

Innovation in the Social Sciences is committed to an expeditious peer review and publication process in order to regularly contribute groundbreaking research to the scientific conversation.
Open Access
Editors-in-Chief: and
FORTHCOMING IN 2024

In 2024, individuals will become eligible for a limited promotional period of free access to the Journal of Femininities. Please be sure to revisit this page to take advantage of this offer.

The Journal of Femininities is the first academic journal devoted to the study of Femininities and uniquely offers an outlet for scholarship on femininity. The Journal of Femininities cultivates and unifies the field of Femininities by publishing content that advances theories and methods in the study of femininity. The journal seeks to challenge and re-examine the taken-for-granted norms and associations of femininity and to treat Femininities as an academic discipline similar to others that focus on particular social dimensions. Articles that appear in the Journal of Femininities contribute to deeper and more complex understandings of femininity.

The Journal of Femininities publishes cutting-edge research focused on femininity. It is a peer-reviewed international journal that publishes high-quality research from a variety of disciplines (e.g., sociology, psychology, gender studies, business, public health, education, political science, media studies, legal studies, family science, etc.) and is particularly supportive of interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary work from feminist perspectives. The journal welcomes submissions of methodologically rigorous empirical articles, both qualitative and quantitative, as well as critical essays, theoretical papers, and book reviews. Articles published in the Journal of Femininities employ diverse methodologies to explore perceptions and constructions of femininity or to deliberately examine femininity as a framework or intersectional axis. The Journal of Femininities encourages submissions that examine femininity across intersectional axes of race, sexuality, disability, class, body size, religion, culture, or gender/sex. Please contact either editor to discuss opportunities to guest-edit a special issue or special feature.

The Journal of Femininities understands “femininity” as an often overlapping but separate construct from “woman” or “female” and thus does not treat women and femininity synonymously.

The journal will welcome the following types of submissions (in APA format). For all empirical research, the Editors-in-Chief encourage uploading a supplementary file with a more detailed methods section. Reference lists are not included in the word counts.

Standard Research
• Brief reports (2,000 words)
• Original research (7,500 words)
• Systematic and scoping reviews (10,000 words)
• Critical essays (6,000 words)

Praxis & Applied Content
• Clinical notes (6,000 words)
• Legal notes (6,000 words)
• Activist/advocate notes (6,000 words)
• Policy reports (6,000 words)

Commentary
• Book reviews (2,000 words)
• Interviews and roundtables (4,000 words)
• Community voices (4,000 words)

Arts & Varia
• Poetry
• Research creation
• Other scholarly arts-based analyses and commentary

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the Journal of Femininities Editorial Office.

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Editor-in-Chief:
The Journal of Labor and Society is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering the political economy of labor, labor movements, and class relations throughout the world. The journal was established in 1997, was published by Wiley Periodicals through 2020, and is published by Brill starting in 2021. The journal’s editorial office is located within the Brooklyn College of the City University of New York Graduate Center for Worker Education. The Journal of Labor and Society publishes peer-reviewed, scientific research into the major social, political, economic, and cultural issues faced by workers around the world. In particular, the journal highlights the transformation of the international economy and aims to situate labor relations and conflict in this wider context. The journal also provides a forum for scholarly and collegial examination of the effects of the history of states, parties, and social movements on labor and work. Volumes 1-19 of the Journal of Labor and Society were published under the journal's previous name WorkingUSA.

The journal will welcome the following types of submissions:
- Research articles (5,000-12,500 words)
- Book reviews (1,000-2,000 words)
- Review essays (2,000-5,000 words)
- Commentaries (maximum of 5,000 words)

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the JLSO Editorial Office.

For book review queries, please contact the book review editor, Robert Ovetz.

Please take a moment to visit the related book series Studies in Political Economy of Global Labor and Work.
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Editor-in-Chief:
Individuals are eligible for free access to the Journal of Pacifism and Nonviolence until 31 December 2024, using access token JPN4U. Click here for more information.

The Journal of Pacifism and Nonviolence aims to:

1. analyse and critique the considerable range of pacifist positions (political, ethical, religious, etc.) and approaches to nonviolence in both theory and practice, reflect on historical and more recent case studies (small- or large-scale), reflect on influential activists and social movements, and compare the effectiveness of violence and nonviolence as well as the effectiveness of the huge variety of tactics of nonviolent dissent;
2. interrogate central accusations against pacifism: that it reinforces the status quo; that it is predominantly white and middle class; that it cannot be sustained in the most challenging scenarios; that it is philosophically incoherent or morally impoverished, etc.;
3. discuss tensions between pacifism (as an ethical position) and nonviolence (as a form of political action) and consider criticisms of both;
4. consider, compare, and discuss theories and practices of pacifism and nonviolence (including those that have emerged in the Global South and/or that may employ vocabularies different from those employed in the Global North) and/or that may find expression through art/aesthetics;
5. study the multiple (political, social, economic, psychological, cultural, philosophical, etc.) direct and indirect consequences of violence and militarism and of nonviolent action and pacifism;
6. examine the place of violence and nonviolence in the history of political thought, in the arguments of core thinkers (e.g., Hobbes, Kant, Tolstoy, Gandhi, Schmidt, Arendt, Bourdieu, Butler), in those of overlooked or marginalised thinkers, as well as in political ideologies (e.g., anarchism, fascism, liberalism, feminism), in some of their principal concepts (e.g., masculinity, democracy, sovereignty, utopia, prefiguration, colonialism), and in relation to themes examined in cognate scholarship (e.g., technology, emotions, temporality, identity);
7. analyse the relationship between nonviolence/violence and gender, race, and other social identities; for example, how racism and patriarchy may be tied to the legitimation of violence and how racial and gender identities, norms, and/or privilege intersect with the practice and strategy of nonviolent action;
8. explore and debate the diverse religious/spiritual roots of pacifism and nonviolence past and present: Christian, Buddhist, Muslim, Indigenous, etc.;
9. debate the role of violence in popular culture past and present, the often lukewarm reception of pacifist ideas by the broader public, and the interests these serve;
10. assess the potential for not only nonviolent resistance but also nonviolent policies of governance (such as in public order maintenance, policing, crime management, and counterterrorism), nonviolent practices of protection (such as unarmed civilian protection and zones of peace), and practical proposals to move away from institutions that rely on violence (such as “trans-armament”, demilitarisation, and nonviolent civilian-based defence);
11. re-examine predominant assumptions in international relations theory and practice about terrorism, the international order, “just war”, etc.;
12. develop more precise conceptualisations of violence and nonviolence, reflecting on the exact nature of violence (e.g., institutional violence, property damage, racism, gendered constructs) and on the point at which direct action becomes violent;
13. identify and debate methodological challenges in researching pacifism and nonviolence, articulate pacifist critiques to research ethics, and reflect on pedagogies of pacifism and nonviolence.

The Journal of Pacifism and Nonviolence is committed to methodological pluralism and welcomes research employing either theoretical or empirical methods. It is rooted in politics and international relations (including security studies, social movements studies, political theory, peace studies, terrorism studies, strategic studies, and resistance studies) and is open to contributions grounded, for example, in historiography, sociology, anthropology, psychology, economics, geography, philosophy, and religious studies.

The Journal of Pacifism and Nonviolence invites submission of research articles as well as other output types -- guidelines for which may be found below under the 'Submit Article' tab -- and especially welcomes potential contributions from authors from the Global South. The journal adheres to Brill’s Publication Ethics Policy.

Research articles should not normally exceed 10,000 words all-inclusive. The procedure for other submissions is explained alongside the Instructions for Authors, each downloadable as a separate PDF from within the “Submit Article” tab below. The journal will not feature translations.

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Notebooks: The Journal for Studies on Power is an academic, peer-reviewed, multi-disciplinary publication intended to serve as a dialogue-generating conduit for research on power. Power is a complex phenomenon and can be defined in multiple ways. For the purposes of this journal, power implies submission either by consent or by coercion. This means that, apart from being exercised through violence, power can be exercised through hegemony produced by “common sense”. However, power still implies exploitation. Exploitation, via the exercise of hegemonic power, occurs in many domains: global politics, institutional administration, the state, legal systems, social dynamics, family, the workplace, education, economic mechanisms and socioeconomic relations, language, media, communications, and more.

Notebooks is interested in why and how power is exercised, preserved, and contested. The journal documents processes whereby certain ideas and types of knowledge achieve dominance and are variously expressed via not only coercion but also consent. Notebooks, being a quintessentially inter-/transdisciplinary enterprise, encourages different methodological approaches and welcomes studies from all disciplines, to include but not limited to: sociology, economics, political studies, psychology, biology, history, anthropology, philosophy, linguistics, international relations, criminology, municipal law, and international law.

Notebooks opposes the fragmentation and overspecialization of knowledge. Its aim is to serve as a forum for critical dialogue between the humanities, social sciences, law, and even the natural sciences. In line with global studies, there is no prescribed specific unit of analysis, and this includes individuals, formal and informal groups, institutions, societies, and various combinations of these units. The journal also encourages contributions from outside academia.

The journal welcomes the following types of submissions:
- Research articles (approximately 7000-9000 words, excluding references).
- Philological articles that directly recall Gramsci’s and Gramscian thinking and its critics (approximately 7000-9000 words). These represent an important contribution to the international debate on the supposedly appropriate use and application of Gramscian categories and will trigger a significant and rare dialogue among the international “users” of Gramsci and Italian (or Italian language-proficient) groups of philological scholars.
- Debates, commentaries, comments/replies, interviews, etc. on current issues or previously published articles (approximately 2000-3000 words).
- Review articles (approximately 3000 words).
- Book reviews.

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the Notebooks Editorial Office.

For book review queries, please contact the book review editor, Francesco Pontarelli.

Notebooks is published in cooperation with the GramsciLab and the Istituto Gramsci della Sardegna.
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Editor-in-Chief:
A “protest turn” is upon us. The Arab Spring uprisings, Occupy Wall Street, anti-immigrant mobilization, and Black Lives Matter – all speak to this historical juncture. Against this backdrop, Protest inaugurates a forum for capturing this expanding global phenomenon of contentious politics. To this end, it invites contributors to interpret the evolving nature of power and power dynamics and relations across various terrains of protest. Protest is neither single nor fixed, and the journal champions the diversity of ontology, epistemology, and methodology of knowing protest, undertaking to reflect it in the “writing” of protest. This dimension is intended to elicit new openings for inquiring more widely and globally into the protest turn.

The journal aims to:
• Parse the complexities of protest as they play out across time and space.
• Chart anti-systemic struggles by the indignants of the world – the faces of marginalization – in their bid to strike back at structures, forces, discourses, and relations of power.
• Understand emerging constructions and re-constructions of identity and peoplehood as well as negotiation of distribution and representation of power.
• Offer a platform that brings academic practitioners and activists in the field into conversation with one another.
• Narrativize the normative dimensions of protest as emancipatory activisms in pursuit of social justice and race, gender, environmental, and socio-economic rights, equality, and protections, etc.
• Create an international episteme around the topic of protest that probes cross-country, regional, and global patterns as well as local specificities.
• Interpret protest within dialectics of formal and informal (polity, economy, society, culture, language, etc.), local and global, academic and activist, politician and protestor, structure and agency, past and present, theoretical and empirical, text and context.
• Emphasize the different modes of knowledge-practices in which protest and its writing are embedded.

The travel of protest brings to the fore a plethora of questions about how activisms are imbricated in the lives of people, publics, communities, and ideas. How do the processes, actors, and milieus of change affect cities, peoples, and ideas, and vice-versa? How may protest interweave with revolution and transition? Interventions are geared towards investigating this angle.

Protest invites submissions that engage with the most recent theoretical, methodological, and empirical advances in the study of protest. As a single but multi-faceted scholarly forum, the journal serves as a platform that contributes to debates on “ruly” (top-down) and “unruly” (bottom-up) dynamics of change. The journal welcomes contributions about communities, people, ideas, institutions, and processes, all within the context of protest.

The journal welcomes the following types of submissions:
• Research articles: introducing empirical and/or theoretical explorations (7500-8500 words)
• Special Essays: commissioned from a seasoned figure (scholar, politician, activist, syndicalist, witness to a revolution, etc.) (5000-7500 words)
• Pedagogical Corner: section with articles on how to teach protest and offering resources for the classroom (2000-3000 words)
• Protest Voices: section geared especially towards reporting from voices in the Global South, with short articles written by protesters/activists in the field cataloguing and reflecting on their personal protest experiences (2000-3000 words)
• Reviews: short articles reviewing books, films, and cultural exhibitions and events (1500-2000 words)
• Interviews: one per issue with protest figures/organizers, be they public intellectuals, academicians, media personalities, or public figures, especially in relation to ongoing or live protests (2000-3000 words)
• Global Protest Spotter: section with submissions tracking/charting contemporaneous protest activity and protest “hot zones” around the world (may vary in length and will be assessed on an ad-hoc basis)

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the Protest Editorial Office.

If interested in submitting a proposal for a special issue in Protest, please read the Instructions for Special Issues.
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Editor-in-Chief:
Anthropologists have long engaged communities and topics that are central to contemporary debates. Through ethnographic research, they aim to understand how people’s everyday lives are shaped by and in turn shape larger structural forces. However, although cultural and social anthropology have produced many insights to help us understand the world in which we live, anthropologists have at times turned their conceptual and therefore ethical gaze inward. Public Anthropologist, an international, peer-reviewed journal, opens the possibility for dialogue and debates that are timely and socially and politically challenging. The journal examines the issues of our time in a way that both encourages and scrutinizes a diverse range of shifts outwards from the purely academic realm toward wider publics and counter-publics engaged in cultural and political exchanges and collective collaborations for change. This approach implicitly interrogates the implications and expectations of anthropology’s public presence.

Public Anthropologist boldly and candidly engages with conditions of violence, inequality, and injustice and explores ways in which anthropology might generate public awareness and have an impact beyond academia.

In its journey into the dilemmas and challenges of the contemporary world, Public Anthropologist avoids standardizing intellectual efforts into specifically formatted articles. Rather, it welcomes diversity and creative writing. Articles published in the journal should be accessible yet authoritative, appealing yet not sensationalist. A submission must be the work of a specialist, but without jargon; methodologically rigorous, and yet politically engaging.

The editors invite articles and special issues on topics related to war, rights, poverty, security, access to resources, new technologies, freedom, human exploitation, health, humanitarianism, violence, racism, migration and diaspora, crime, social class, hegemony, environmental challenges, social movements, and activism. We encourage both ethnographic and more theoretical submissions. Although the journal mainly focuses on contemporary issues, we also welcome submissions that adopt a historical perspective. The journal also publishes reviews of books, films, and documentaries that deal with relevant challenges and opportunities of our time and encourages reviews of both scholarly works and fictional literature as well as the work of activists, journalists, and artists. Reviews of non-English materials may be submitted.

Public Anthropologist addresses a broad readership of social and cultural anthropologists, sociologists, ethnographers, political scientists, social and cultural historians, political historians, political actors, policy makers, activists, journalists, and artists.

Articles should be between 6000 and 9000 words in length. Reviews should comprise between 1000 and 2000 words.

Visit the Public Anthropologist blog for lively conversations, original posts, comments on work published in the journal, previews of Tables of Contents, and more!

For editorial queries and proposals, or for review queries, please contact the editor-in-chief, Antonio De Lauri.

Public Anthropologist Award (PUAN-A)
PUAN-A is awarded to a social and cultural anthropologist who has published an outstanding contribution that addresses – in innovative, engaging and compelling ways – key societal issues related to one or more of the following topics: violence, war, poverty, social movements, freedom, aid, rights, injustice, inequality, social exclusion, racism, health, and environmental challenges. For more information, visit the PUAN-A web page linked above.
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WorkingUSA is continued as the Journal of Labor and Society from Volume 20 (2017).

The Journal of Labor and Society is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering the political economy of labor, labor movements, and class relations throughout the world. The journal was established in 1997, was published by Wiley Periodicals through 2020, and is published by Brill starting in 2021. The journal’s editorial office is located within the Brooklyn College of the City University of New York Graduate Center for Worker Education. The Journal of Labor and Society publishes peer-reviewed, scientific research into the major social, political, economic, and cultural issues faced by workers around the world. In particular, the journal highlights the transformation of the international economy and aims to situate labor relations and conflict in this wider context. The journal also provides a forum for scholarly and collegial examination of the effects of the history of states, parties, and social movements on labor and work. Volumes 1-19 of the Journal of Labor and Society were published under the journal's previous name WorkingUSA.