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Editor-in-Chief:
As of 2021, Brill Research Perspectives in Popular Culture is no longer published as a journal but continues as a book series. Please find the new home page here.

The expression “popular culture” alludes, essentially, to a form of culture that makes little, if any, categorical distinctions between “high or serious culture” and “low or entertainment culture,” making it historically a non-traditional form of culture. In the evolution of human cultures, popular culture stands out as atypical, since it takes cultural material from any source and revamps it according to the laws of the marketplace. In contrast to historical (traditional) culture, it rejects both the supremacy of tradition and of established cultural norms, as well as the pretensions of intellectualist tendencies within contemporary artistic cultures. Popular culture has always been highly appealing for this very reason, bestowing on common people the assurance that cultural trends are for everyone, not just for an elite class of artists and cognoscenti. It is thus populist, unpredictable, and highly ephemeral, reflecting the ever-changing tastes of one generation after another. Moreover, among the ephemeral trends and texts, there are some that have risen to the level of high art, hence the paradox and power of popular culture.

Brill Research Perspectives in Popular Culture is a peer-reviewed, hybrid journal and reference publication that features studies exploring all aspects of popular culture today, from its traditional platforms, audiences and traditional electronic media, to the contemporary digital media. Each issue comprises a single, uniquely focused short monograph that examines some particular aspect, text, or event that falls under the rubric of “pop culture,” including popular programs (sitcoms, adventure series, etc.); celebrities; fads; theories of the popular imagination; the relation of popular culture to other cultures; the role of memetic culture vis-à-vis traditional forms of culture; the nature of performance; the psychological, anthropological, and semiotic aspects of popular culture systems; and the like. In addition, studies will also look at specific frameworks for analyzing popular culture, such as archetype theory and carnival theory.

The intended audience of Brill Research Perspectives in Popular Culture is the network of scholars and instructors involved in popular culture studies and cognate disciplines (psychology, culture studies, literary criticism, anthropology, musicology, sociology, neuroscience, and art criticism).

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Athina Dimitriou.
Managing Editors: and
Individuals are eligible for free access to the International Journal of Social Imaginaries until 31 December 2023, using access token IJSI4U. Click here for more information.

The International Journal of Social Imaginaries offers the premier scholarly forum for the interdisciplinary and diverse interest in social imaginaries, capturing increasingly prominent and versatile contributions in one globally accessible journal. The International Journal of Social Imaginaries seeks to bring theoretical and analytical clarity in discussions on imaginaries, carefully distinguishing the concept from related notions, such as culture, representation, ideology, and identity. It provides a forum for theoretical and conceptual debates, as well as empirically driven studies, and invites contributions from a range of disciplines and with a variety of foci (from the philosophical/theoretical to the empirical; related to meaning, rationality, and creativity on individual and collective levels, but also in relation to politics, governance, and institutions). It publishes not only prominent but also emerging authors in the human and social sciences who are shaping the field of social imaginaries.

The journal is guided by the goal to reflect on the human condition, in past, present, and future societies and constellations, without limiting itself to any geographical or sociocultural region. It aims to pursue intertwining and overlapping debates on social imaginaries and the imagination. This includes a focus on intersecting debates on cultural varieties of meaning, power, religion, and socially instituted worlds of action, while promoting fresh approaches to the key challenges of the current age. The International Journal of Social Imaginaries includes in its focal range discussions of historical ruptures in societal meaning (as with the emergence of early democracy, modernity, and capitalist society) but equally discusses critical contemporary shifts in meaning-making, related to, for example, (post-)democracy and populism, globalized capitalism, environmentalism, and terrorism and human rights. The journal’s field of interest includes contemporary debates concerning specific concrete issues and their effects on how we view our relationships to the social and natural environment, as well as broader problematics, such as modernity and civilizations, on the one hand, and the 'meaning of meaning’ and the question of the lifeworld, on the other. The International Journal of Social Imaginaries demonstrates that researching social imaginaries is crucial to allowing for a comprehensive and rigorous understanding of existing collective systems of meaning in — and across — societies as well as of shifting and newly emerging meanings, in particular in relation to constellations of power, action, and the self. Such understanding is all the more important in distinctive periods — such as in our current epoch – in which taken-for-granted meanings are in a state of rapid transformation.

The International Journal of Social Imaginaries welcomes scholarly contributions that engage with imaginaries in a variety of ways and that deal with theoretical/philosophical, methodological and/or empirical matters and may relate to different levels, such as the individual, collective — societal or state — as well as cross-border/cross-regional and transnational levels of investigation. The journal will further launch calls for thematic special issues on topical themes, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, contemporary capitalism, regional foci on Russia and Eastern Europe, China and East Asia, the United States and the Americas, populism, the crisis of democracy, social media, and others.

The journal will consider the following types of submissions:
• Research articles (8,000-10,000 words; exceptions will be considered)
• Review essays (maximum of 5,000 words)
• Single-book reviews (maximum of 2,000 words)
• Varia: Book review fora, roundtables, interviews, analyses, and commentaries are also welcome and will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.
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A sense of belonging is a fundamental human need. Alarmingly, research tells us that a significant portion of the population feel lonely and like they don’t belong. Loneliness has become an epidemic and people in adolescence and old age groups are at risk. Having a sense of belonging has widespread physiological and psychological benefits, with positive outcomes that transcend the lifespan, and possibly generations. The need to belong is common for all people irrespective of culture, race, ethnicity, geography, or location.

The aim of this journal is to present contemporary research on belonging, human connection and loneliness and draw together transdisciplinary approaches and theoretical orientations to address a burgeoning issue of our time. A secondary aim of the journal is to highlight how detrimental a lack of belonging is for psychological and physical functioning. The Journal of Belonging and Human Connection (JBHC) is a direct response to a critical issue and seeks to provide a platform for which we can begin to address it.

For questions and/or submissions please contact the Editors-in-Chief Kelly-Ann Allen or Christopher Boyle.
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Editor-in-Chief:
Journal of Material Cultures in the Muslim World (MCMW) aims to be a new reference for field archaeologists, art historians, anthropologists, curators, and scholars and students of the (art) history, archaeology, architecture, anthropology & ethnography of the Muslim world. This readership represents a new broader definition of material culture that includes not only artefacts, architectural structures and monuments, but also crafts. The journal also aims to inform (other) disciplines and historiographies, by including (unreviewed) archaeological field surveys for example.
The journal focuses on un(der)explored Muslim regions outside of the Middle East and Nord Africa: sub-Saharan Africa, the Indian Ocean, Central Asia, India, South-East Asia and Europe.
The journal accepts submissions in English, French, German and Spanish and short reports in Arabic, Persian and Turkish with an English abstract.
Submissions should be sent to the Editor-in-Chief, Stéphane Pradines.
Frequency: 1 volume per year, 2 issues per volume.
Open Access
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Editor-in-Chief:
FORTHCOMING in 2023

In 2023, individuals will become eligible for a limited promotional period of free access to the Journal of Pacifism and Nonviolence. Please be sure to revisit this page to take advantage of this offer.

The Journal of Pacifism and Nonviolence aims to:

1. analyse and critique the considerable range of pacifist positions (political, ethical, religious, etc.) and approaches to nonviolence in both theory and practice, reflect on historical and more recent case studies (small- or large-scale), reflect on influential activists and social movements, and compare the effectiveness of violence and nonviolence as well as the effectiveness of the huge variety of tactics of nonviolent dissent;
2. interrogate central accusations against pacifism: that it reinforces the status quo; that it is predominantly white and middle class; that it cannot be sustained in the most challenging scenarios; that it is philosophically incoherent or morally impoverished, etc.;
3. discuss tensions between pacifism (as an ethical position) and nonviolence (as a form of political action) and consider criticisms of both;
4. consider, compare, and discuss theories and practices of pacifism and nonviolence (including those that have emerged in the Global South and/or that may employ vocabularies different from those employed in the Global North) and/or that may find expression through art/aesthetics;
5. study the multiple (political, social, economic, psychological, cultural, philosophical, etc.) direct and indirect consequences of violence and militarism and of nonviolent action and pacifism;
6. examine the place of violence and nonviolence in the history of political thought, in the arguments of core thinkers (e.g., Hobbes, Kant, Tolstoy, Gandhi, Schmidt, Arendt, Bourdieu, Butler), in those of overlooked or marginalised thinkers, as well as in political ideologies (e.g., anarchism, fascism, liberalism, feminism), in some of their principal concepts (e.g., masculinity, democracy, sovereignty, utopia, prefiguration, colonialism), and in relation to themes examined in cognate scholarship (e.g., technology, emotions, temporality, identity);
7. analyse the relationship between nonviolence/violence and gender, race, and other social identities; for example, how racism and patriarchy may be tied to the legitimation of violence and how racial and gender identities, norms, and/or privilege intersect with the practice and strategy of nonviolent action;
8. explore and debate the diverse religious/spiritual roots of pacifism and nonviolence past and present: Christian, Buddhist, Muslim, Indigenous, etc.;
9. debate the role of violence in popular culture past and present, the often lukewarm reception of pacifist ideas by the broader public, and the interests these serve;
10. assess the potential for not only nonviolent resistance but also nonviolent policies of governance (such as in public order maintenance, policing, crime management, and counterterrorism), nonviolent practices of protection (such as unarmed civilian protection and zones of peace), and practical proposals to move away from institutions that rely on violence (such as “trans-armament”, demilitarisation, and nonviolent civilian-based defence);
11. re-examine predominant assumptions in international relations theory and practice about terrorism, the international order, “just war”, etc.;
12. develop more precise conceptualisations of violence and nonviolence, reflecting on the exact nature of violence (e.g., institutional violence, property damage, racism, gendered constructs) and on the point at which direct action becomes violent;
13. identify and debate methodological challenges in researching pacifism and nonviolence, articulate pacifist critiques to research ethics, and reflect on pedagogies of pacifism and nonviolence.

The Journal of Pacifism and Nonviolence is committed to methodological pluralism and welcomes research employing either theoretical or empirical methods. It is rooted in politics and international relations (including security studies, social movements studies, political theory, peace studies, terrorism studies, strategic studies, and resistance studies) and is open to contributions grounded, for example, in historiography, sociology, anthropology, psychology, economics, geography, philosophy, and religious studies.

The Journal of Pacifism and Nonviolence invites submission of research articles and proposals for special issues, special sections and forums -- guidelines for which may be found below under the 'Submit Article' tab -- and especially welcomes potential contributions from authors from the Global South. The journal adheres to Brill’s Publication Ethics Policy.

Research articles should not normally exceed 10,000 words all-inclusive. The procedure for forum proposals is explained alongside the Instructions for Authors, each downloadable as a separate PDF from within the “Submit Article” tab below. The journal will not feature book reviews, review essays, or translations.

Individuals are eligible for free access to Notebooks: The Journal for Studies on Power until 31 December 2022, using access token POWR4U. Click here for more information.

Notebooks: The Journal for Studies on Power is an academic, peer-reviewed, multi-disciplinary publication intended to serve as a dialogue-generating conduit for research on power. Power is a complex phenomenon and can be defined in multiple ways. For the purposes of this journal, power implies submission either by consent or by coercion. This means that, apart from being exercised through violence, power can be exercised through hegemony produced by “common sense”. However, power still implies exploitation. Exploitation, via the exercise of hegemonic power, occurs in many domains: global politics, institutional administration, the state, legal systems, social dynamics, family, the workplace, education, economic mechanisms and socioeconomic relations, language, media, communications, and more.

Notebooks is interested in why and how power is exercised, preserved, and contested. The journal documents processes whereby certain ideas and types of knowledge achieve dominance and are variously expressed via not only coercion but also consent. Notebooks, being a quintessentially inter-/transdisciplinary enterprise, encourages different methodological approaches and welcomes studies from all disciplines, to include but not limited to: sociology, economics, political studies, psychology, biology, history, anthropology, philosophy, linguistics, international relations, criminology, municipal law, and international law.

Notebooks opposes the fragmentation and overspecialization of knowledge. Its aim is to serve as a forum for critical dialogue between the humanities, social sciences, law, and even the natural sciences. In line with global studies, there is no prescribed specific unit of analysis, and this includes individuals, formal and informal groups, institutions, societies, and various combinations of these units. The journal also encourages contributions from outside academia.

The journal welcomes the following types of submissions:
- Research articles (approximately 7000-9000 words, excluding references).
- Philological articles that directly recall Gramsci’s and Gramscian thinking and its critics (approximately 7000-9000 words). These represent an important contribution to the international debate on the supposedly appropriate use and application of Gramscian categories and will trigger a significant and rare dialogue among the international “users” of Gramsci and Italian (or Italian language-proficient) groups of philological scholars.
- Debates, commentaries, comments/replies, interviews, etc. on current issues or previously published articles (approximately 2000-3000 words).
- Review articles (approximately 3000 words).
- Book reviews.

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the Notebooks Editorial Office.

For book review queries, please contact the book review editor, Francesco Pontarelli.

Notebooks is published in cooperation with the GramsciLab and the Istituto Gramsci della Sardegna.
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Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS) encourages transversal social inquiries. The journal seeks to transcend disciplinary, linguistic and cultural fragmentations characteristic of scholarship in the 20th century. It aspires to reinvigorate scholarly engagements untroubled by canonic approaches and to provide a space for outstanding scholarship, marginalized elsewhere due to academic conventions. PARISS seeks to promote a plurality of ways of thinking, researching and writing and to give access to contemporary authors in the social sciences coming from non-English-speaking countries. The editors encourage contributions that write across disciplines, academic cultures and writing styles. Innovative and collective research is particularly welcome.

PARISS is published in cooperation with the Centre d’étude sur les Conflits — Liberté et Sécurité (CCLS).

The editors welcome individually authored or co-authored articles (up to 3 authors; approximately 7,000-11,000 words including footnotes) and collectively authored articles (3+ authors; 10,000-25,000 words including footnotes), as well as book reviews, interviews, commentaries, and shorter articles focused on research methodologies (all up to 5,000 words).

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the PARISS Editorial Office.
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Editor-in-Chief:
Populism is a peer-reviewed, international journal devoted to promoting transdisciplinary examination of populism in both historical and contemporary contexts. The journal’s fundamental premise is that, while there is currently no coherent frame of analysis, most experts do agree that populism is a complex and variegated phenomenon that should be examined from different theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches. Moreover, there is general agreement about its growing importance in the social sciences and about the rather obvious etymological fact that it is predicated upon the positing of an antagonistic relationship between two collective entities: ‘the people’ and ‘the elites’.

However, here is where scholarly consensus ends and disagreement comes to the fore. Some researchers prefer to approach populism as an ideology; others consider it as a mode of expression, a discursive style, a species of rhetoric, a political style, a type of political logic, or an exclusionary form of identity politics. Still others eschew such ideational and discursive approaches in favor of more policy-centered and organizational perspectives on populism as a political strategy, a strategy of political organization, or a political project of mobilization that also includes social movements. Put in an even more general framework, populism has also been referred to as a dimension of political culture. Although these different approaches are not necessarily mutually exclusive, they can be usefully associated with three distinct research paradigms identified by Gidron and Bonikowski (2013): (1) populism as political ideology; (2) populism as political style; and (3) populism as political strategy.

Populist currents have characterized many of the most pivotal events and developments in human history—often in times when established institutions lose their normative influence over individual and collective behavior. Aiming to serve as the premier forum for transdisciplinary research, the journal seeks to foster reflection on populism as one powerful way in which societies respond to rapid change in the social order. With that in mind, we also encourage contributions that discuss the impact of globalization on the transformation of the conventional ideological landscape in general and on populism in particular.

Populism invites scholarly yet accessible contributions that advance dialog in a way that resonates with academics, practitioners, policy-makers, and students as well as the general reader. The journal publishes standard articles (6,000-10,000 words recommended, but exceptions will be considered), research reports (up to 5,000 words), (single- or multi-) book reviews (up to 1,200 words), and interviews/conversations (not to exceed 2,500 words). Shorter articles, analyses, discussions, and commentaries are also welcome and will be assessed on a case-by-case basis. Normally, manuscripts should not exceed thirty pages in length. Submissions should conform to the Instructions for Authors, available below as a downloadable PDF.

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the managing editor, Lane Crothers.
For book review queries, please contact the book review editor, Amentahru Wahlrab.
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Editor-in-Chief:
Anthropologists have long engaged communities and topics that are central to contemporary debates. Through ethnographic research, they aim to understand how people’s everyday lives are shaped by and in turn shape larger structural forces. However, although cultural and social anthropology have produced many insights to help us understand the world in which we live, anthropologists have mostly turned their conceptual and therefore ethical gaze inward, with few notable exceptions. Public Anthropologist, an international, peer-reviewed journal, opens the possibility for dialogue and debates that are timely and socially and politically challenging. It creates a hybrid, critical space between the ponderous nature of traditional academic journals and the immediacy of blogs, newspapers, and experts’ accounts. The journal examines the issues of our time in a way that both encourages and scrutinizes a diverse range of shifts outwards from the purely academic realm towards wider publics and counter-publics engaged in cultural and political exchanges and collective collaborations for change. This approach implicitly interrogates the implications and expectations of anthropology’s public presence.

Public Anthropologist boldly and candidly confronts conditions of violence, inequality, and injustice and explores ways in which anthropology might generate public awareness and have an impact on political change. The journal is interested in the space in which newspapers, television, political actors, new media, activists, experts, and academics continually mobilize positions that support or challenge dominant narratives.

The editors believe it is time to definitively push anthropology beyond its association with elitism (and its colonial legacy) and to make it relevant not only for understanding cultural difference, but also for making a difference.

In its journey into the dilemmas and challenges of the contemporary world, Public Anthropologist avoids standardizing intellectual efforts into specifically formatted articles. Rather, it welcomes diversity and creative writing. Articles published in the journal should be accessible yet authoritative, appealing yet not sensationalist. A submission must be the work of a specialist, but without jargon; methodologically rigorous, and yet politically engaging.

The editors invite articles and special issues committed to making anthropology speak directly to other scholars and to the wider public on issues related to war, rights, poverty, security, access to resources, new technologies, freedom, human exploitation, health, humanitarianism, violence, racism, migration and diaspora, crime, social class, hegemony, environmental challenges, social movements, and activism. We encourage both ethnographic and more theoretical submissions. Although the journal mainly focuses on contemporary issues, we also welcome submissions that adopt a historical perspective. In addition, submissions of interviews or conversations between anthropologists and journalists, activists, political actors, or artists on different topics at the core of the journal’s interests will be considered. The journal also publishes reviews of books, films, and documentaries that deal with relevant challenges and opportunities of our time and encourages reviews of both scholarly works and fictional literature as well as the work of activists, journalists, and artists. Reviews of non-English materials may be submitted.

Public Anthropologist addresses a broad readership of social and cultural anthropologists, sociologists, ethnographers, political scientists, social and cultural historians, political historians, political actors, policy makers, activists, journalists, and artists.

Articles should be between 6000 and 9000 words in length. Reviews should comprise between 1000 and 2000 words. Interviews/conversations should not exceed a maximum of 2500 words.

Visit the Public Anthropologist blog for lively conversations, original posts, comments on work published in the journal, previews of Tables of Contents, and more!

For editorial queries and proposals, or for review queries, please contact the editor-in-chief, Antonio De Lauri.

Public Anthropologist Award (PUAN-A)
PUAN-A is awarded to a social and cultural anthropologist who has published an outstanding contribution that addresses – in innovative, engaging and compelling ways – key societal issues related to one or more of the following topics: violence, war, poverty, social movements, freedom, aid, rights, injustice, inequality, social exclusion, racism, health, and environmental challenges. For more information, visit the PUAN-A web page linked above.
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Over the past years, a new interdisciplinary and dynamic research field on religion and development has emerged. A growing corpus of literature has begun to investigate the manifold relationships and interactions of religion and development. The topic is of cross-disciplinary interest, with research spanning from religious studies and theology to anthropology, sociology, politics, economics and development studies. Religion and Development seeks to contribute to the religion and development research field by publishing original, peer-reviewed research in this field. The journal is interdisciplinary and welcomes contributions from across the social sciences and humanities. Both religion and development are understood in a wide sense. Religion encompasses all forms of religious institutions, communities, networks, scenes, cultures, and phenomena. Development refers to manifold processes of social, economic, ecological, political and cultural dynamics in all parts of the world. One core frame of reference are the Sustainable Development Goals. Overarching questions are, for example, how religious communities contribute to processes of (sustainable) development, how social, economic, ecological, political and cultural dynamics affect religion and what understandings and notions of (sustainable) development exist in religious communities.
Open Access
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