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As of 2021, Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth is no longer published as a journal but continues as a book series.

Taking a global perspective, Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth (RPGY) addresses specific issues related to the impact of expanding interdependency of national societies on youth conditions. At a time when youth has undergone tremendous changes in most of the countries in the world (Western, Eastern, Southern and Northern), this publication provides academics, practitioners and policy makers worldwide with exhaustive analyses and syntheses regarding youth in a global context as well as the renewed approaches needed to assess these shifts.

Young people both are affected by and are the actors of the globalization of everyday life. Mobility (travel, migration, education), multicultural backgrounds, relations to educational and job markets, demands for leisure recognition, transformation of families and of childhood and youth, and the proliferation and development of youth cultures are among the changing factors that Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth investigates on macro, meso and micro levels.

Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth welcomes proposals coming from the wide range of the human and social sciences (to include sociology, anthropology, demography, economics, psychology, linguistics, political science, history, etc.).

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.
Editor-in-Chief:
Editor:
Diaspora Studies is a leading interdisciplinary, academic journal dedicated to the scientific study of diasporas and international migration. Based on rigorous, double-blind peer-review, the journal publishes cutting-edge analyses of diaspora issues from the perspective of international relations, economics, politics, public policy, development studies, identity, history, and critical theory. Specifically, the journal features global scholarly contributions on diaspora engagement policies, as well as political and stakeholder participation of diaspora actors and organizations. It showcases studies on the role of diaspora actors and diaspora issues for international relations, discourses, and development activities in migrants’ home and host countries. The journal welcomes theoretical and empirical contributions on comparative diasporas, the role of international organizations, and civil society and it aims to advance scholarship and debate on emerging global networks and transnational identities.

Diaspora Studies is published in association with the Organisation for Diaspora Initiatives (ODI).

Diaspora Studies welcomes submissions for special issues and the journal’s four annual issues publish:
• Original research articles (7,000–10,000 words)
• Review articles (7,000–10,000 words)
• Book reviews (1,500–2,500 words)

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact Diaspora Studies’ editorial office: editorial.diasporastudies@gmail.com
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How fast is the Muslim population growing in Europe? What is the role of fertility, mortality, and international migration in explaining differences between religious and non-religious people groups? How is religion changing our world today? The Journal of Religion and Demography (JRD) explores these questions and other relevant topics.
JRD is the only journal to feature annual estimates for religious and non-religious affiliation by continent, pairing them with scholarly analyses from diverse disciplines such as social science, demography, history, and geography. Each issue presents summaries of findings, sources, and methods, along with their implications for the demography of religion. All articles are peer-reviewed and the target audience is anyone interested in demographic trends and developments regarding religion.
The journal is a continuation of the Yearbook of International Religious Demography.
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As of 2021, Lusotopie is no longer published by Brill.

Lusotopie is a comparatist international journal devoted to the analysis of politics in the broad sense (building and reform of the state, nationalism, elections, ethnicity, neoliberalism, gender relations, racialization of social life, international conflicts and civil wars, media, civil society, cultures, religions, migrations, etc.) within the contemporary spaces stemming from Portuguese history and colonization. Lusotopie addresses these topics within the Portuguese heterogeneous post-colonial space, on four continents, and populated by mobile communities and numerous Diasporas. Since 1994, Lusotopie has published a wide range of contributions from researchers of over 30 different nationalities and has brought up an egalitarian dialogue space thanks to use of three international languages (French, Portuguese and English).

Lusotopie est une revue comparatiste internationale, dont le but est le développement de la recherche politique sur les espaces contemporains issus de l’histoire et de la colonisation, portugaises. Elle entend poser tous les problèmes généraux de l’analyse politique (nationalisme, ethnicité, néolibéralisme, réforme de l’État, fédéralisme, relations de genre, guerres civiles, médias, société civile, élections, etc.) : son originalité est de les “traiter” au sein de cet espace postcolonial et composite, présent sur quatre continent s et dans de nombreuses diasporas. Paraissant depuis 1994, Lusotopie a publié des travaux d’auteurs de plus de trente nationalités, souvent originaires de pays du Sud et institué un espace de dialogue égalitaire grâce à son usage systématique de trois langues internationales (français, portugais et anglais).

Lusotopie é uma revista comparatista internacional cujo objectivo é o desenvolvimento da inves t igação polít ica sobre os espaços contemporâneos provenientes da história e da colonização, portuguesas. Propõe-se abordar os problemas gerais da análise política (nacionalismo, etnicidade, neoliberalismo, reforma do Estado, federalismo, relações de género, guerras civis, media, eleições, etc.): a originalidade da revista é a de tratar aqueles problemas no seio do espaço post-colonial e plural, presente em quatro continentes e em numerosas diásporas. Saindo desde 1994 Lusotopie publicou trabalhos de autores de mais de trinta nacionalidades, muitos dos quais naturais de países do Sul, e instituiu um espaço de diálogo egalitário graças ao uso sistemático de três línguas internacionais (francês, inglês e português).
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Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS) encourages transversal social inquiries. The journal seeks to transcend disciplinary, linguistic and cultural fragmentations characteristic of scholarship in the 20th century. It aspires to reinvigorate scholarly engagements untroubled by canonic approaches and to provide a space for outstanding scholarship, marginalized elsewhere due to academic conventions. PARISS seeks to promote a plurality of ways of thinking, researching and writing and to give access to contemporary authors in the social sciences coming from non-English-speaking countries. The editors encourage contributions that write across disciplines, academic cultures and writing styles. Innovative and collective research is particularly welcome.

PARISS is published in cooperation with the Centre d’étude sur les Conflits — Liberté et Sécurité (CCLS).

The editors welcome individually authored or co-authored articles (up to 3 authors; approximately 7,000-11,000 words including footnotes) and collectively authored articles (3+ authors; 10,000-25,000 words including footnotes), as well as book reviews, interviews, commentaries, and shorter articles focused on research methodologies (all up to 5,000 words).

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the PARISS Editorial Office.
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Editor-in-Chief:
Anthropologists have long engaged communities and topics that are central to contemporary debates. Through ethnographic research, they aim to understand how people’s everyday lives are shaped by and in turn shape larger structural forces. However, although cultural and social anthropology have produced many insights to help us understand the world in which we live, anthropologists have mostly turned their conceptual and therefore ethical gaze inward, with few notable exceptions. Public Anthropologist, an international, peer-reviewed journal, opens the possibility for dialogue and debates that are timely and socially and politically challenging. It creates a hybrid, critical space between the ponderous nature of traditional academic journals and the immediacy of blogs, newspapers, and experts’ accounts. The journal examines the issues of our time in a way that both encourages and scrutinizes a diverse range of shifts outwards from the purely academic realm towards wider publics and counter-publics engaged in cultural and political exchanges and collective collaborations for change. This approach implicitly interrogates the implications and expectations of anthropology’s public presence.

Public Anthropologist boldly and candidly confronts conditions of violence, inequality, and injustice and explores ways in which anthropology might generate public awareness and have an impact on political change. The journal is interested in the space in which newspapers, television, political actors, new media, activists, experts, and academics continually mobilize positions that support or challenge dominant narratives.

The editors believe it is time to definitively push anthropology beyond its association with elitism (and its colonial legacy) and to make it relevant not only for understanding cultural difference, but also for making a difference.

In its journey into the dilemmas and challenges of the contemporary world, Public Anthropologist avoids standardizing intellectual efforts into specifically formatted articles. Rather, it welcomes diversity and creative writing. Articles published in the journal should be accessible yet authoritative, appealing yet not sensationalist. A submission must be the work of a specialist, but without jargon; methodologically rigorous, and yet politically engaging.

The editors invite articles and special issues committed to making anthropology speak directly to other scholars and to the wider public on issues related to war, rights, poverty, security, access to resources, new technologies, freedom, human exploitation, health, humanitarianism, violence, racism, migration and diaspora, crime, social class, hegemony, environmental challenges, social movements, and activism. We encourage both ethnographic and more theoretical submissions. Although the journal mainly focuses on contemporary issues, we also welcome submissions that adopt a historical perspective. In addition, submissions of interviews or conversations between anthropologists and journalists, activists, political actors, or artists on different topics at the core of the journal’s interests will be considered. The journal also publishes reviews of books, films, and documentaries that deal with relevant challenges and opportunities of our time and encourages reviews of both scholarly works and fictional literature as well as the work of activists, journalists, and artists. Reviews of non-English materials may be submitted.

Public Anthropologist addresses a broad readership of social and cultural anthropologists, sociologists, ethnographers, political scientists, social and cultural historians, political historians, political actors, policy makers, activists, journalists, and artists.

Articles should be between 6000 and 9000 words in length. Reviews should comprise between 1000 and 2000 words. Interviews/conversations should not exceed a maximum of 2500 words.

Visit the Public Anthropologist blog for lively conversations, original posts, comments on work published in the journal, previews of Tables of Contents, and more!

For editorial queries and proposals, or for review queries, please contact the editor-in-chief, Antonio De Lauri.

Public Anthropologist Award (PUAN-A)
PUAN-A is awarded to a social and cultural anthropologist who has published an outstanding contribution that addresses – in innovative, engaging and compelling ways – key societal issues related to one or more of the following topics: violence, war, poverty, social movements, freedom, aid, rights, injustice, inequality, social exclusion, racism, health, and environmental challenges. For more information, visit the PUAN-A web page linked above.
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Editors-in-Chief: and
Youth and Globalization is an academic forum for discussion and exchanges, a space for intellectual creativity on all questions relating to youth in a globalizing world. Its aim is to provide an innovative understanding of youth studies in a global context based on multiscalar (both local and global), multilevel (economic, political, social), transnational, and multidisciplinary approaches.

Drawing on both theoretical and empirical research, and in addition to and as a complement of the Brill book series Youth in a Globalizing World, the journal explores how young people relate to globality and its outcomes.

Globalization is an economic phenomenon, linked to the domination of an increasingly financialized capitalism. Is has also an important cultural dimension, due to increasing mobility of cultural goods, global icons, imaginaries, global technoscapes, migration, and diasporas. On a political level, national and international policies affect the ways in which young people relate to the world, from educational programs (e.g., teaching foreign languages, with mobility as part of education, as in the Erasmus program, etc.) to job markets to leisure activities.

Young people both are affected by and are the actors of the globalization of everyday life. Mobility (travel, migration, education), multicultural backgrounds, relations to educational and job markets, demands for leisure recognition, transformation of families and of childhood and youth, and the proliferation and development of youth cultures are among the changing factors that Youth and Globalization investigates.

Consequently, the journal invites scholars to address such questions as:
• Are we witnessing the globalization, the localization, or the hybridization of the conditions of youth?
• How do young people, even in an ephemeral way, experience cultures that were once considered exotic or peripheral?
• What are the links between transnational economics, political and institutional structures, transnational processes of flexibility at work and change in welfare state regimes, and the transition to adulthood?
• What about the sense of local belonging in a supposedly global age? What conceptions of democracy and human rights are held, shared, and performed by young people in a global context?
• What is the downside of the normative injunctions, widespread among younger generations in Western societies, to be open-minded and curious?
And how do young people cope with this pressure?

Youth and Globalization invites contributions from scholars and advanced researchers that promote dialog in a way that resonates with academics, practitioners, policy-makers, and students as well as the general reader. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles (9,000 words max), book reviews (up to 1,200 words), and interviews/conversations (not to exceed 2,500 words). Submissions should conform to the Instructions for Authors, available below as a downloadable PDF.

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the Youth and Globalization Editorial Office.
For book review queries, please contact the book review editor, Peter Holley.
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