Brill Journal Archives Online Part 2: International Law & Human Rights Collection 2019

The Brill Journal Archives Online Part 2: International Law & Human Rights Collection 2019 offers access to Brill’s journal archival content in the international law and human rights subject area for the years 2000-2015.
The Brill Journal Archives Online provide specific benefits to both researchers and librarians:
• Complete access to all available content of leading academic journals in the humanities, social sciences, international law & human rights and biology & science.
• A unique historical perspective on research in these fields, which benefits research being carried out today.
• Full-text search options for the entire archive collection.
• Responsive design enables a positive user experience on mobile devices.
• Cost-effective access to the complete history of journals to support research and teaching.
• Guarantees perpetual access to all the content in the Brill Journal Archives Online.
• Compliant with COUNTER usage statistics.
Brill Journal Archives Online Part 1: International Law & Human Rights Collection 2019

The Brill Journal Archives Online Part 1: International Law & Human Rights Collection 2019 offers access to Brill’s journal archival content in the international law and human rights subject area for the years 1850-1999.
The Brill Journal Archives Online provide specific benefits to both researchers and librarians:
• Complete access to all available content of leading academic journals in the humanities, social sciences, international law & human rights and biology & science.
• A unique historical perspective on research in these fields, which benefits research being carried out today.
• Full-text search options for the entire archive collection.
• Responsive design enables a positive user experience on mobile devices.
• Cost-effective access to the complete history of journals to support research and teaching.
• Guarantees perpetual access to all the content in the Brill Journal Archives Online.
• Compliant with COUNTER usage statistics.

Editor-in-Chief Simon N.M. Young

The Asia-Pacific Journal on Human Rights and the Law is the world’s only law journal offering scholars a forum in which to present comparative, international and national research dealing specifically with issues of law and human rights in the Asia-Pacific region.
Neither a lobby group nor tied to any particular ideology, the Asia-Pacific Journal on Human Rights and the Law is a scientific journal dedicated to responding to the need for a periodical publication dealing with the legal challenges of human rights issues in one of the world’s most diverse and dynamic regions.

The journal will be a prime source of information and reference not only to legal scholars and students but also to all those who are in any way involved in human rights issues across the whole of the Asia-Pacific region. Politicians, civil servants, social activists, academics, lawyers, historians, sociologists, political scientists, students, diplomats, social researchers, journalists and others will find the Asia-Pacific Journal on Human Rights and the Law an invaluable source of relevant and timely information.

Submission Instructions:
Authors who wish to have their work considered for publication should submit their papers by email to: apjhrl@hku.hk.
Authors should follow the OSCOLA (4th edn.) standard for the citation of legal authorities. Articles should normally be under 20,000 words (all inclusive).

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The European Journal of Migration and Law is a quarterly journal on migration law and policy with specific emphasis on the European Union, the Council of Europe and migration activities within the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe. This journal differs from other migration journals by focusing on both the law and policy within the field of migration, as opposed to examining immigration and migration policies from a wholly sociological perspective. The Journal is the initiative of the Centre for Migration Law of the University of Nijmegen, in co-operation with the Brussels-based Migration Policy Group.
The European Journal of Migration and Law provides an invaluable source of information and a platform for discussion for government and public officials, academics, lawyers and NGOs interested in migration issues in the European context. Devoted exclusively to migration law and policy, the original research and analysis the Journal presents will emphasize the development of migration policies across Europe. Each issue will have a cross-disciplinary approach to migration and social issues such as access of migrants to social security and assistance benefits, including socio-legal and meta-juridical perspectives.
Papers for consideration should be addressed to Elspeth Guild ( e.guild@jur.ru.nl), or Paul Minderhoud ( p.minderhoud@jur.ru.nl).

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2017 Impact Factor: 1.121
5 Year Impact Factor: 1.250

Editor-in-Chief Alex J. Bellamy, Sara E. Davies and Luke Glanville

Global Responsibility to Protect is the premier journal for the study and practice of the responsibility to protect (R2P). This journal seeks to publish the best and latest research on the R2P principle, its development as a new norm in global politics, its operationalization through the work of governments, international and regional organizations and NGOs, and finally, its relationship and applicability to past and present cases of genocide and mass atrocities including the global response to those cases. Global Responsibility to Protect also serves as a repository for lessons learned and analysis of best practices; it will disseminate information about the current status of R2P and efforts to realize its promise. Each issue contains research articles and at least one piece on the practicalities of R2P, be that the current state of R2P diplomacy or its application in the field.

Global Responsibility to Protect promotes a universal understanding of R2P and efforts to realize it, through encouraging critical debate and diversity of opinion, and to acquaint a broad readership of scholars, practitioners, students and analysts with the principle and its operationalization.

Global Responsibility to Protect seeks insights and approaches from every region of the world that might contribute to understanding, operationalizing and applying R2P in practice.

Online submission: Articles for publication in Global Responsibility to Protect can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

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Helsinki Monitor

Quarterly on Security and Cooperation in Europe

Editor-in-Chief Arie Bloed

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help. Please note: As of 2008 Helsinki Monitor is published as Security and Human Rights. Four times a year, Helsinki Monitor reports on developments in and related to the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). It covers new and ongoing measures taken in the context of the Helsinki process, including preventive diplomacy, arms control, human rights, confidence-building, security, democracy building, election monitoring, economic security, and environmental matters. With its thorough analysis and background information, Helsinki Monitor has become a primary source of reference on the OSCE process. The journal, founded in 1990, is a legacy of the Helsinki process that was designed during the Cold War, to bridge Eastern and Western Europe on the basis of common principles and co-operative security. It brings to light current developments affecting human rights, peace and security across North America, and wider Europe including Central Asia. Major themes include: • Conflict prevention; • Human rights; • Minorities; • Democracy building; and • Cooperative security. The journal not only reflects on developments, it draws attention to problems, and contributes to the policy-making discourse. With its thorough analysis and thought-provoking articles, Security and Human Rights is a must-read for all those interested and involved in the OSCE and the process of guaranteeing security and protecting human rights. Readers will find a regular column, both short and long articles, a chronicle of OSCE events, as well as occasional book reviews and interviews. Helsinki Monitor is published by Koninklijke Brill N.V. in cooperation with the Netherlands Helsinki Committee (NHC) and the International Helsinki Federation (IHF), which continue to be responsible for its contents. For back volumes older than 2 years, please contact William S. Hein & Co., Inc., 1285 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209 orders@wshein.com / www.wshein.com or Periodicals Service Company, 11 Main Street, Germantown, NY 12526, USA psc@periodicals.com / www.periodicals.com/brill.html

Human Rights Case Digest

The European Convention System

Edited by Prof. James Busutti

This journal has ceased publication from 2010.

Edited by Christof Heyns

Contrary to popular belief, there is a vast body of law dealing with human rights in Africa in existence today. The first priority at the moment is consequently not the adoption of new norms, or the creation of even more structures, the most immediate challenge lies in making the existing structures work and ensuring compliance with the norms already accepted by African societies. Access to the relevant material constitutes a necessary precondition for any other gains in this field. The aim of this reference work is, therefore, to make African human rights law accessible to all those involved in or interested in human rights law on the continent, in order to strengthen its impact. Primary documents are introduced and reproduced and presented in a coherent framework. The main institutions - public and private - dealing with human rights in Africa are identified and discussed. Comprehensive overviews of the international human rights legal regimes applicable to Africa, as well as country reports are provided. Access to this body of law will enable judges, practicing lawyers, academics and other researchers, as well as law reformers, NGOs, activists and students, to both ascertain and assert these rights. It will also serve to ensure the development of a stronger indigenous African human rights jurisprudence, rooted in local experience, history, culture and practices. This book consequently tries to contribute towards documenting, systemising and anchoring the African human rights system. This publication replaces and updates the earlier Human Rights Law in Africa Series, which appeared on an annual basis from 1996 to 1999. In order to make the publication accessible in Africa, the Centre for Human Rights and the Raoul Wallenberg Institute in Sweden have undertaken a targeted distribution campaign on the continent.
The International Human Rights Law Review is a bi-annual peer-reviewed journal. It aims to stimulate research and thinking on contemporary human rights issues, problems, challenges and policies. It is particularly interested in soliciting papers, whether in the legal domain or other social sciences, that are unique in their approach and which seek to address poignant concerns of our times. One of the principal aims of the journal is to provide an outlet to human rights scholars, practitioners and activists in the developing world who have something tangible to say about their experiences on the ground, or in order to discuss cases and practices that are generally inaccessible to European and North-American audiences. The Editorial Board and the publisher are keen to work hands-on with such contributors and to help find solutions where necessary to facilitate translation or language editing in respect of accepted articles.

The journal is aimed at academics, students, government officials, human rights practitioners, and lawyers working in the area, as well as individuals and organisations interested in the areas of human rights law. The Journal publishes critical articles that consider human rights law, policy and practice in their various contexts, at global, regional, sub-regional and national levels, book reviews, and a section focused on an up-to-date appraisal of important jurisprudence and practice of the UN and regional human rights systems including those in the developing world.

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