Brill Open Social Sciences

An International Journal

Bandung

Journal of the Global South

Edited by Pak Nung WONG

As a cross-disciplinary journal in the humanities and social sciences, Bandung: Journal of the Global South aims at providing an academic and policy platform for scholars and practitioners to develop new theoretical perspectives, share revealing findings, and exchange views. These should be grounded on the complex postcolonial landscapes of African, Asian, and Latin American peoples, for identifying their own ways and strategies of development and decolonization. Alternative paradigms, worldviews, ontologies, and epistemologies as well as praxis are encouraged to develop context-sensitive debates pertinent to African, Asian, and Latin American intellectual traditions and empirical, cultural, and theoretical realities.

Bridging Humanities

Platform for Alternatives Methodologies

Edited by Mirjam de Bruijn

Bridging Humanities – Platform for Alternatives Methodologies is a peer reviewed, interdisciplinary and multi-area online publication. The scope of Bridging Humanities is to publish original projects that include visuals and other kinds of digital sources as an integral part of the publication. Bridging Humanities includes original research from the humanities intended as an open field that is connected with other disciplines. Each publication is an interactive online space in which text and visuals are used as sources to produce and present knowledge from their field. Using this new format, Bridging Humanities encourages researchers to experiment with new methodologies for publication in which the importance of the digital is recognized as an integral part of the publication and research process. The website publishes at least one new project per year and is hosted externally: www.bridginghumanities.com

Editor-in-Chief Marcel Danesi

The expression “popular culture” alludes, essentially, to a form of culture that makes little, if any, categorical distinctions between “high or serious culture” and “low or entertainment culture,” making it historically a non-traditional form of culture. In the evolution of human cultures, popular culture stands out as atypical, since it takes cultural material from any source and revamps it according to the laws of the marketplace. In contrast to historical (traditional) culture, it rejects both the supremacy of tradition and of established cultural norms, as well as the pretensions of intellectualist tendencies within contemporary artistic cultures. Popular culture has always been highly appealing for this very reason, bestowing on common people the assurance that cultural trends are for everyone, not just for an elite class of artists and cognoscenti. It is thus populist, unpredictable, and highly ephemeral, reflecting the ever-changing tastes of one generation after another. Moreover, among the ephemeral trends and texts, there are some that have risen to the level of high art, hence the paradox and power of popular culture.

Brill Research Perspectives in Popular Culture is a peer-reviewed, hybrid journal and reference publication that features studies exploring all aspects of popular culture today, from its traditional platforms, audiences and traditional electronic media, to the contemporary digital media. Each issue comprises a single, uniquely focused short monograph that examines some particular aspect, text, or event that falls under the rubric of “pop culture,” including popular programs (sitcoms, adventure series, etc.); celebrities; fads; theories of the popular imagination; the relation of popular culture to other cultures; the role of memetic culture vis-à-vis traditional forms of culture; the nature of performance; the psychological, anthropological, and semiotic aspects of popular culture systems; and the like. In addition, studies will also look at specific frameworks for analyzing popular culture, such as archetype theory and carnival theory.

The intended audience of Brill Research Perspectives in Popular Culture is the network of scholars and instructors involved in popular culture studies and cognate disciplines (psychology, culture studies, literary criticism, anthropology, musicology, sociology, neuroscience, and art criticism).

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Jennifer Obdam.

Editor-in-Chief Chaime Marcuello Servós

FORTHCOMING IN 2020

We are living in turbulent times in which we need to face global challenges connecting fields and perspectives. Complex social issues require complex, multidisciplinary approaches to deal with their complexity. In recent decades, sociocybernetics has developed as a distinct discipline that aims to meet this challenge. Sociocybernetics is concerned with applying first and second order cybernetics, the systems sciences and complexity science in the social sciences. Brill Research Perspectives in Sociocybernetics and Complexity disseminates advances in sociocybernetics and consolidate existing research efforts, including theory and applications. Each issue addresses developments around a specific topic; thus, besides the audience interested in developments in sociocybernetics and the complexity sciences, each issue appeals to those in other disciplines who are engaged with a particular topic. The topics addressed range from foundational issues to applications in systems modelling, the arts, social interventions, environmental problems, social work and care, public policies, and urban design, at a local or global scale. Brill Research Perspectives in Sociocybernetics and Complexity is an invaluable resource for scholars, policymakers and practitioners wishing to learn about the latest developments in sociocybernetics, as well as a useful resource for teachers and those studying the social sciences and related disciplines.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Jennifer Obdam.

Diplomatica

A Journal of Diplomacy and Society

Editor-in-Chief Giles Scott-Smith and Kenneth Weisbrode

Individuals are eligible for free access to Diplomatica until 31 December 2020, using access token DIPL4U. Click here for more information.

Diplomatica: A Journal of Diplomacy and Society addresses the broad range of work being done across the social sciences and the humanities that takes diplomacy as its focus of investigation. The journal explores and investigates diplomacy as an extension of social interests, forces, and environments. It is multidisciplinary, providing a space to unite perspectives from diplomatic history (humanities) and diplomatic studies (social sciences) in particular. It is interdisciplinary, expanding beyond its disciplinary foundation of history to enrich historical perspectives with innovative analyses from other disciplines. It seeks to broaden the study of diplomacy temporally, contributing to a re-appraisal of diplomacy across the modern and early modern eras and beyond, in this way bridging temporal divides and introducing debate between scholars of different periodizations. It is determinedly global in orientation, providing a space for inter-regional comparisons. The journal is published in cooperation with the New Diplomatic History (NDH) Network.

Diplomatica seeks to merge diplomatic history and diplomatic studies through three main approaches:
1. Habitat: Exploring the multiple identities, behaviors, rituals, and belief systems of diplomats and how they change according to time, place, and space;
2. Actors: Challenging the centrality of the nation-state as the principal actor framing an understanding of what diplomacy is by focusing equally on the role of non-state actors;
3. Disciplines: Introducing appropriate methodologies from the social sciences, such as prosopography, network analysis, gender studies, economics, geography, and communications, in order to broaden the analytical study of diplomatic habitats, actors, and interactions through time.

Broadly speaking, Diplomatica covers the study of diplomatic process more than the study of diplomatic product. It questions, investigates, and explores all aspects of the diplomatic world, from interactions between the professionally diplomatic and the non-diplomatic to the arrangement of summits and banquets, the architecture of ministries and residences, and the identities, roles, practices, and networks of envoys, policy entrepreneurs, salonnières, and all other private and quasi-private individuals who affect the course of diplomacy.

The journal welcomes submissions dealing with any period and locale from across the humanities and social sciences. Submissions should be standard article length (approximately 8,000 words including footnotes) and written for a general, scholarly audience.

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the Diplomatica Editorial Office.

For book review queries, please contact the book review editor, Haakon Ikonomou.

The Mattingly Award
Brill, the editorial board of Diplomatica, and the New Diplomatic History Network are pleased to provide an annual award of €500 for excellence and originality in an essay on diplomatic society or culture, broadly defined. The Mattingly Award is named for the American historian, Garrett Mattingly (1900-62), an esteemed writer, scholar, and professor at Columbia University. Best known for his history of the Spanish Armada (1959), which won the Pulitzer Prize, and his biography of Catherine of Aragon (1941), Mattingly pioneered the study of diplomatic institutions, practices, norms, and personalities, notably in his classic history of early modern Europe, Renaissance Diplomacy (1955).

NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in Diplomatica can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

Edited by Katie Barclay, Andrew Lynch and Giovanni Tarantino

EHCS is dedicated to understanding the emotions as culturally and temporally-situated phenomena, and to exploring the role of emotion in shaping human experience and action by individuals, groups, societies and cultures.

EHCS welcomes theoretically-informed work from a range of historical, cultural and social domains. The journal aims to illuminate (1) the ways emotion is conceptualized and understood in different temporal or cultural settings, from antiquity to the present, and across the globe; (2) the impact of emotion on human action and in processes of change; and (3) the influence of emotional legacies from the past on current social, cultural and political practices.

EHCS is interested in multidisciplinary approaches (both qualitative and quantitative), from history, art, literature, languages, music, politics, sociology, cognitive sciences, cultural studies, environmental humanities, religious studies, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, and related disciplines. The journal also invites papers that interrogate the methodological and critical problems of exploring emotions in historical, cultural and social contexts, and the relation between past and present in the study of feelings, passions, sentiments, emotions and affects. Finally, Emotions also accepts theoretically-informed and reflective scholarship that explores how scholars access, uncover, construct and engage with emotions in their own scholarly practice.

Following an initial review process by the editors, EHCS sends acceptable submissions to two expert independent readers outside the author’s home institution, employing a double-blind review procedure.

EHCS is published on behalf of the Society for the History of Emotions.
The Journal of Disability Studies in Education (JDSE) is an interdisciplinary journal that focuses upon the experiences and outcomes of people with disabilities in education. JDSE focuses upon the overt and covert barriers to access to, and presence, participation and success in education for people with disabilities. JDSE will therefore examine the architecture and cultures of education across all sectors: early childhood education; elementary education; secondary education; higher education; vocational training and informal and alternative education provision.

This is a fully Open Access journal, which means that all articles are freely available online, ensuring maximum, worldwide dissemination of content, in exchange for an Article Publication Charge.

As the journal receives a subvention for publication from the University of South Australia the Article Publication Charge is waived. For more information visit the Brill Open dedicated webpage.

JDSE will publish 8 - 10 papers per volume per year. At the end of each volume, the papers will be published as a monograph for purchase. The papers will be published online at regular intervals to maintain the journal’s impact. Manuscripts will be subject to a rigorous anonymous peer review process.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.

Please click here for the Call for Papers.
Lusotopie is a comparatist international journal devoted to the analysis of politics in the broad sense (building and reform of the state, nationalism, elections, ethnicity, neoliberalism, gender relations, racialization of social life, international conflicts and civil wars, media, civil society, cultures, religions, migrations, etc.) within the contemporary spaces stemming from Portuguese history and colonization. Lusotopie addresses these topics within the Portuguese heterogeneous post-colonial space, on four continents, and populated by mobile communities and numerous Diasporas. Since 1994, Lusotopie has published a wide range of contributions from researchers of over 30 different nationalities and has brought up an egalitarian dialogue space thanks to use of three international languages (French, Portuguese and English).

Lusotopie est une revue comparatiste internationale, dont le but est le développement de la recherche politique sur les espaces contemporains issus de l’histoire et de la colonisation, portugaises. Elle entend poser tous les problèmes généraux de l’analyse politique (nationalisme, ethnicité, néolibéralisme, réforme de l’État, fédéralisme, relations de genre, guerres civiles, médias, société civile, élections, etc.) : son originalité est de les “traiter” au sein de cet espace postcolonial et composite, présent sur quatre continent s et dans de nombreuses diasporas. Paraissant depuis 1994, Lusotopie a publié des travaux d’auteurs de plus de trente nationalités, souvent originaires de pays du Sud et institué un espace de dialogue égalitaire grâce à son usage systématique de trois langues internationales (français, portugais et anglais).

Lusotopie é uma revista comparatista internacional cujo objectivo é o desenvolvimento da inves t igação polít ica sobre os espaços contemporâneos provenientes da história e da colonização, portuguesas. Propõe-se abordar os problemas gerais da análise política (nacionalismo, etnicidade, neoliberalismo, reforma do Estado, federalismo, relações de género, guerras civis, media, eleições, etc.): a originalidade da revista é a de tratar aqueles problemas no seio do espaço post-colonial e plural, presente em quatro continentes e em numerosas diásporas. Saindo desde 1994 Lusotopie publicou trabalhos de autores de mais de trinta nacionalidades, muitos dos quais naturais de países do Sul, e instituiu um espaço de diálogo egalitário graças ao uso sistemático de três línguas internacionais (francês, inglês e português).

Editor-in-Chief Tugba Basaran, Monique Jo Beerli, Didier Bigo and Emma Mc Cluskey

FORTHCOMING IN 2020

In 2020, individuals will become eligible for a limited promotional period of free access to Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS). Please be sure to revisit this page to take advantage of this offer.

Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS) encourages transversal social inquiries. The journal seeks to transcend disciplinary, linguistic and cultural fragmentations characteristic of scholarship in the 20th century. It aspires to reinvigorate scholarly engagements untroubled by canonic approaches and to provide a space for outstanding scholarship, marginalized elsewhere due to academic conventions. PARISS seeks to promote a plurality of ways of thinking, researching and writing and to give access to contemporary authors in the social sciences coming from non-English-speaking countries. The editors encourage contributions that write across disciplines, academic cultures and writing styles. Innovative and collective research is particularly welcome.

PARISS is published in cooperation with the Centre d’étude sur les Conflits — Liberté et Sécurité (CCLS).

The editors welcome individually authored or co-authored articles (up to 3 authors; approximately 7,000-11,000 words including footnotes) and collectively authored articles (3+ authors; 10,000-25,000 words including footnotes), as well as book reviews, interviews, commentaries, and shorter articles focused on research methodologies (all up to 5,000 words).

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the PARISS Editorial Office.