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Sephardic Editions, 1550-1820: Installment 3
Spanish and Portuguese books written and/or published by Sephardic Jews of Early Modern Europe

Library of Jewish heritage
The present selection reflects the impressive cultural achievements of these "New Jews" and former conversos, who are also called Western Sephardim. In communities such as Ferrara, Amsterdam, Hamburg, London, and Bayonne, these Iberians - who had been raised as Catholics, and were largely unaware of Hebrew and formal Judaism - reconnected with their ancestral faith through the creation of an authentic library of Jewish heritage in the Spanish and the Portuguese language.

Modern Jews
Numerous Bibles, prayer books, and a whole range of works on the essentials of Judaism and the duties of a Jew were published in the vernacular. However, book-printing was not limited to re-education in Judaism alone; many of the works written or printed by the former conversos also reflect the broad cultural interest, and the academic background, they had brought with them from Spain and Portugal. Precisely the encounter between Iberian Renaissance culture and the rediscovered Judaism in environments such as the cosmopolitan, tolerant city of Amsterdam, turned these Western Sephardim into the first "modern Jews," as is exemplified by the life and works of such eminent figures as Uriel da Costa, Menasseh ben Israel, and Joseph Penso de la Vega.

Most influential works
This selection comprises the most influential works written or printed by the Iberian Jews in the major centers of the Western Sephardi Diaspora (e.g., the Netherlands, France, Italy, Germany, England); it includes all genres and reflects both their religious and their secular culture. Many of the editions included in Meyer Kayserling's bibliography are exceedingly rare and are available only in specialized collections of Judaica. The aim of the present selection is to make the Sephardi heritage generally available in order to meet the needs of modern scholarship.

Harm den Boer, University of Amsterdam
Dutch Occasional Poetry of the 16th through 18th Centuries
Part 2

The genre of occasional poetry, verse written to celebrate milestones in the life of private citizens, was introduced into the young Dutch Republic in the late sixteenth century. Starting from Leyden academic circles, it rapidly gained popularity among large sections of Dutch society; a poem written on the occasion of a wedding or a funeral must have been a status symbol for the well-to-do citizen. Publication of these virtually unknown poems ensures their survival, but also their availability to scholars all over the world. Together with Dutch Occasional Poetry of the 16th through 18th Centuries - Part 1 this collection will constitute a firm base for many kinds of research, for historians, art historians, students of genealogy, musicologists, and students of book history.

This collection is also included in the Dutch Occasional Poetry of the 16th through 18th Centuries collection.

Various Authors & Editors

Early Printed Cyrillic Books
Library of Moscow State University, Belorussian and Ukrainian Publications

National and cultural identity
This collection bears witness to the complex, yet fascinating process of book printing in Belorussia and Ukraine when these countries were still under Polish-Lithuanian rule. Deprived of political rights and freedom of worship, the Orthodox Byelorussians and Ukrainians struggled to preserve their national and cultural identity by printing religious, liturgical, and historical books in the Cyrillic script. Often, these publications had a polemical intent – attacking the Catholics, the Uniates, and the Protestants alike – or propagated an openly nationalist agenda. One of the most popular works included in this collection is the Sinopsis – the first printed book on the history of the Eastern Slavs that promoted the idea of uniting all Slavic peoples. Equally interesting in this respect is the politically charged Trebnik, which was published in 1646 at the instigation of Piotr Mogila, the Metropolitan of Kiev.

The Brotherhoods
The role of the Brotherhoods ( bratstva) was crucial to this process of national emancipation. The Brotherhoods were political organizations that sought to stimulate Belorussian and Ukrainian culture by, for example, establishing schools and printing houses. Alarmed by these initiatives and anxious to curb the activities of the Brotherhoods, the government of the Polish-Lithuanian Union, in tandem with the Catholic and the Uniate Church, banned all politically sensitive publications. However, this did not prevent educated and influential Belorussians and Ukrainians from taking part in printing Cyrillic books. Printing houses specializing in Belorussian or Ukrainian publications existed at some point in time in Kiev, L’vov, Chernigov, Vilnius, Mogilev, and many other places.

Kiev-Perch Laura
The largest and most productive printing house in Ukraine belonged to the famous Monastery of the Caves, in Kiev ( Kieov-pecherskaia lavra). It functioned from 1616 until the end of the 18th century, and is represented in the present collection by 47 titles. These include a 1619 edition of the Anfologion (translated by Iov Boretskii), Pamva Berynda’s Leksikon slavianorusskii (the first Slavic “encyclopedia”), and a number of Besedy (“Conversations” on religious topics) that are especially noteworthy for the exceptionally high quality of the typography. The second largest segment of the collection comprises 20 books printed by the Uspenskii Brotherhood of Lvov, which was one of the most important cultural centers in Ukraine during the 17th and 18th centuries. In Belorussia, the Brotherhoods of Vilna and Eve, as well as smaller printing houses in Mogilev and Kutein, specialized in the printing of Cyrillic books. Among the most valuable of the 23 Belorussian books included in this collection are Kirill Trankvillion Stavrovetskii’s Perlo mnogotsennoe (1699), Akafisty vsesedmichnye (1698) – which was printed by the Brotherhood of Mogilev – and a number of sumptuously illustrated liturgical works and prayerbooks.

Unique collection
The present collection consists of 109 rare or otherwise valuable Belorussian and Ukrainian books printed in the 17th century. As well as having an historical value, the combination of luxurious design and sophisticated typography makes these works stand out as true landmarks of early book printing. The books were often embellished by professional artists, who added illustrations and designed the title pages. Ukrainian and Belorussian books differed from those printed in Moscow in both style and content. Whereas the latter were funded by the government and meticulously censored by the Metropolitan and the Tsar, the printing in the Ukraine and Belorussia was supported primarily by private donations. Their repertoire was also much more diversified. The books’ more colorful design, their covers, dedications, coats of arms, and spectacular illustrations contribute to the uniqueness of this material.

Moscow State University Library
Moscow State University Library (founded 1756) is one of the biggest libraries in Russia. Today, it stores more than 8 million volumes and owns many rare books and manuscripts. The most valuable part of its holdings is in the Rare Books and Manuscripts section, which accommodates over 200,000 items, including unique Western, Oriental, and Slavonic manuscripts, archives, incunabula, prints, and other early works. The unique collection of early printed Slavonic books was obtained largely through donations, purchases, transfers from other libraries, and the work of the Archeographical Expedition (which spent over 30 years working among Russian Old Believers in different parts of the former Soviet Union). Nowadays, the Slavonic collection comprises 2,170 items dating from the 1400s to the 1900s.
Dutch Occasional Poetry of the 16th through 18th Centuries
Part 1

The genre of occasional poetry, verse written to celebrate milestones in the life of private citizens, was introduced into the young Dutch Republic in the late sixteenth century. Starting from Leyden academic circles, it rapidly gained popularity among large sections of Dutch society; a poem written on the occasion of a wedding or a funeral must have been a status symbol for the well-to-do citizen. Publication of these virtually unknown poems ensures their survival, but also their availability to scholars all over the world. Together with Dutch Occasional Poetry of the 16th through 18th Centuries - Part 2 this collection will constitute a firm base for many kinds of research, for historians, art historians, students of genealogy, musicologists, and students of book history.

This collection is also included in the Dutch Occasional Poetry of the 16th through 18th Centuries collection.

Various Authors & Editors

Book History in Russia

Reference works
In the first part of the catalogue, you can find the dictionaries, among them standard Russian bibliographical reference works, for example, the ones by V.S. Sopikov, Opyt Rossiiskoi bibliografii, ili polnyi slovar' sochinenii i perevodov, napechatannykh na slavenskom i rossiiskom iazykakh, and by P.M. Stroev, Obstoiatel'noe opisanie staropechatnykh knig slavianskikh i rossiiskikh, khraniashchikhsia v biblioteke… grafa F.A., Tolstogo.

Serials
The second part represents the genre of bibliographical magazines, the majority of which were published before the Revolution of 1917. All those titles have a great rarity value today and are difficult to obtain in Western libraries (for instance, Knizhnaai birzha, Pechatnoe delo, Polibiblion and Russkiii bibliofil).

Monographs
The last part includes monographs on a wide variety of subjects, ranging from the invention of book printing in 16th-century Russia by Ivan Fedorov, the history of the first state and private publishing houses in Moscow and St.-Petersburg ( Gosudarev Pechatnyi Dvor, S.Peterburgskaia Sinodal'naia tipografiia), to the spreading of the book through the different strata of society, and the origin of the first Russian state and private libraries. Documents concerning censorship in pre-revolutionary Russia, and works on ownership marks, watermarks, the production of paper and the illustration of the book in medieval Russia (and later in the 18th and 19th centuries) have also been included.

Edited by H.W. de Kooker, K.J.S. Bostoen, B. van Selm and M. Keblusek

The Dutch Republic was the greatest clearing-house of European print in the 17th century, and it remained extremely significant during the folllowing century. Complete 'freedom of the press' was still an unknown concept, but in the Dutch Republic censorship was fairly limited compared to many other European countries. Non-Dutch authors were able to publish their books in the Republic, and Dutch book publishers and traders issued translations of works in Latin and European languages that challenged traditional scientific, social and political conventions. Many of these works had a profound influence on European history and culture.

Contents of book sales catalogues are not limited to records of sales of printed objects; auctions also included scientific intstrument, art objects, and "curiosities".

The largest collections of pre-1801 Dutch book sales catalogues are in:
• Amsterdam (Library of the Dutch Book Trade Association, in Amsterdam University Library, c. 950);
• Paris (Bibliothèque Nationale de France, c. 950);
• St. Petersburg (National Library of Russia, c. 830);
• Wolfenbüttel (Herzog August Library, c. 800 catalogues).

The holdings of these libraries have been filmed already.

Conrad Gessner's Private Library

The Revealing Hand-Written Notes of an Early Modern Polymath

• Number of titles: 70
• Languages used: Latin
• Title list available
• MARC records are available

This source edition of Gessner’s private library contains those seventy eight books that Gessner read most carefully and annotated by hand. The majority have been reproduced from the rich holdings of the Zentralbibliothek Zürich, while other important copies included in this edition are held by the University Library of Basle. The marginalia in these books are so numerous that they almost constitute a new set of sources, which are of interest not only to historians and philologists but also to those who study the history of early modern medicine and the natural sciences.

Location of originals: Zentralbibliothek Zürich; Universitätsbibliothek Basel

Edited by Wim van Dongen

Dances of Death

Titles from the Dance of Death genre.

Various Authors & Editors

Dutch Pamphlets, 1542-1853: The Van Alphen Collection

Pamphlets dated between 1542 and 1853 from the Van Alphen Collection, University Library, Groningen. The pamphlets range from political apologies and manifestoes to tracts for and against predestination in theology. Among them are a lot of funeral sermons and lectures as well. Battles, sieges, treaties, riots and political assassinations form the subject matter of many pamphlets. Most of the pamphlets are published in the Netherlands, but the collection also includes pamphlets from Germany, Belgium and France.

The collection is organized as follows:
I. Abroad:
a. General
b. Foreign relations of the Netherlands
c. Church andreligion
d. Miscellanea
II. Interior:
a. General
b. Events, situations and persons of provincial and local importance
c. Church and religion
d. Miscellenea

Language note
Texts primarily in Dutch; some in French, German, English and Latin.

Bibliographical note
Gregorius van Alphen, (comp.). Catalogus der pamfletten van de bibliotheek der Rijksuniversiteit te Groningen 1542-1853 (niet voorkomende in de catalogi van Broekema, Knuttel, Petit, Van Someren, Tiele en Van der Wulp) (Groningen: J.B. Wolters, 1944).

Provenance
The core of the collection is formed by four large acquisitions: 27 vols., collected by the Counter Reformist preacher Willem Crijnsz, were acquired in 1751. These vols. contain pamphlets regarding the religious differences during and after the Twelve Year Truce (1609-1621). Another 59 vols. contain 1253 pamphlets from the period 1617-1760. Date of acquisition and former owner are unknown. 95 vols. (date of acquisition and former owner also unknown) contain political tracts concerning the differences between England and the Dutch Republic and the troubles in the Republic. They cover the years 1779-1800. In 1842, at the auction-Pabst van Bingerden, 43 vols. were acquired containing pamphlets from the 17th and early 18th century.

Various Authors & Editors

Dutch Pamphlets, 1486-1853: The Knuttel Collection
Part I: 1486-1648

The period from 1486 to 1648 was of crucial significance for the history of the Low Countries and the present Dutch State. This period witnessed first the consolidation of 17 quite disparate provinces under the hegemony of the Habsburg Monarchy. Later the Revolt of the Netherlands against the Spanish Habsburg king Philip II led in the course of 80 years of warfare to the establishment of the Republic of the United Provinces, the forerunner of the modern Netherlands State. The southern Netherlands - now the modern states of Belgium and Luxembourg - continued under Habsburg dominion. Inextricably bound up with these developments on the political level, was the history of the Reformation in the Low Countries. The successful implantation of Calvinist Protestantism in the North and the triumph of Counter-Reformation Catholicism in the South were recognized in 1648 in the Treaty of Munster, which ended the Eighty Years War.

This collection is also included in the Dutch Pamphlets, 1486-1853: The Knuttel Collection collection.