Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Online Primary Source x
  • Brill | Rodopi x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All

Arkyves

Online Reference Tool for the History of Culture

Edited by Hans Brandhorst and Etienne Posthumus

http://arkyves.org/
Arkyves is both a unique database of images and texts and a meeting place for everyone who wants to study imagery and publish about it. All visual and textual sources are made accessible with the help of the multilingual vocabulary for cultural content of the Iconclass system. By using this system it has been made possible to find and retrieve images and texts from various sources on a specific topic.
By using Arkyves it is currently possible to access almost 900.000 images, texts, etc. from libraries and museums in many countries among them the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, the Netherlands Institute for Art History (RKD), the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel, and the university libraries of Milan, Utrecht and Glasgow . More collections will follow in the near future. The database contains a link to the images which are available in open access.
Arkyves is both a research tool for art historians and book historians, as well as a tool to facilitate the process of describing images.

Some of Arkyves’ features:
• Completely rewritten front-end: responsive design in a modern web application.
• New user interface: clear and easy to use, centered around pre-selected themes.
• Iconclass controlled vocabulary for improved powerful retrieval options.
• Iconclass searches currently possible in 9 different languages (English, Dutch, French, German, Finnish, Polish, Portuguese, Italian, Chinese)
• For partners: possibility to create dedicated Iconclass retrieval browsers, for easy inclusion in their website.
• Arkyves is now open as a platform to assist institutions and individual researchers to catalogue and publish their own datasets of images in hybrid Open Access.
• Updated back-end search, based on industry-leading ElasticSearch.


Partner Institutions:
Bayerische Staatsbibliothek; Biblia Sacra project; Bibliothèques Virtuelles Humanistes; Byvanck Illuminated Manuscript project; Cardiff University; Deutsches Hygiene-Museum, Dresden; Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington; Getty Research Institute & Provenance Index; Glasgow University Library; Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel; Koninklijke Bibliotheek, The Hague; The Leiden Collection, New York; Museum Meermanno; RKD, Netherlands Institute for Art History; Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam; Anton Ulrich Museum, Braunschweig; University Library, Amsterdam; University Library, Utrecht; University of Milan, Marengo; University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign



To enquire about this product, or arrange a free 30-day institutional trial, please contact our Sales Department at sales-nl@brill.com (outside the Americas) or sales-us@brill.com (the Americas).

1) Arkyves demo: Product information Information about 'Arkyves, Reference Tool for the History of Culture': what is it, how can you use it, the different tools, future developments, and more. Watch it here
2) Arkyves demo: Searching for content in Arkyves Examples of the different kinds of search possibilities in Arkyves. Watch it here

Art Sales Catalogues Online

Online Access to Complete Sales Catalogues from 1600-1900

Edited by Various Authors & Editors

Now available: User Guide: Art Sales Catalogues Online.

The Art Sales Catalogues Online (ASCO) publication offers easy access to complete historical art sales catalogues for the period 1600 to 1900. Lugt's Répertoire Online database has been included in this publication and serves as the "entrance gate" to the catalogues.
The earliest art sales catalogues, also known as auction catalogues, appeared in the early 17th century, as simple leaflets. Over time, the catalogues grew into extensive, richly-illustrated publications. The catalogues are intriguing not only from the point of view of Art History, but also provide glimpses into the economic and sociological climate of the time.
Much research in the field of Art History relies on access to art sales catalogues. Art Sales Catalogues Online providing access to thousands of complete sales catalogues from the period 1600-1900, combines a wealth of information from art sales catalogues with the reference facility of Lugt’s Répertoire.
In his impressive four-volume work Répertoire des catalogues de ventes publiques intéressant l’art ou la curiosité ("Repertory of Catalogues of Public Sale concerned with Art or Objets d'art"), Frits Lugt (Amsterdam 1884–Paris1970) covered the period 1600 to 1925. In Lugt’s Répertoire, the catalogues are arranged in strict chronological order and provide meticulous details of auctions, as well as recording annotations written in the catalogues. Lugt also indicates the library where the catalogue may be consulted. The online edition of Lugt’s work for the period 1600-1900 is the “entrance gate” to Arts Sales Catalogues Online.

Search Options in ASCO:
• FULL TEXT SEARCH
• Lugt number
• Date of Sale
• Place of Sale
• Provenance
• Auction House
• Content
• Copies
• Keyword
• Getty Provenance Index number
• ESTC number


Product Information:
• Online access to art sales catalogues from 1600-1900
• Includes Lugt’s Répertoire Vols. 1-3
• Currently available: 65482 Lugt records (1600-1900), 34,015 scanned catalogues (1600-1900)
• Last supplement: November 2019: 464 catalogues from the Philadelphia Museum of Art

New supplements will be added regularly.

Please visit our ASCO website at http://primarysources.brillonline.com/browse/art-sales-catalogues-online

To enquire about this product, or arrange a free 30-day institutional trial, please contact our Sales Department at sales-nl@brill.com (outside the Americas) or sales-us@brill.com (the Americas).

Historical Garden Design Online

Sources from the 16th to the 19th centuries

A rich resource for garden, art and architectural historians, this primary source collection of 178 titles covers a broad range of subjects regarding the theory and practice of gardening, horticulture and garden design. Technological aspects are treated as well as garden ornaments, garden buildings, plant use, and the construction of green houses.

The collection includes such watershed works as Salomon de Caus´  Hortus Palatinus (1620), Dominicus Barrière's  Villa Aldobrandina Tusculana sive varij illius hortorum et fontium prospectus (1647), Giovanni Battista Falda's  Li Giardini di Roma(1680), and Christian Cay Lorenz Hirschfeld´s  Theorie der Gartenkunst(1779-85). Also included are the lesser known, but nevertheless, important works, such as Heinrich Hesse´s  Neue Garten-Lust(1696) and  Die Gartenkunst(1797) by J. F. Blotz (pseudonym of F.Ch. Touchy).
Johann Gottfried Grohmann´s  Ideenmagazin für Liebhaber von Gärten(Leipzig, 1796-1802) offers insights into garden ornaments used for well-to-do gardens. The Dutch publication  Het vermakelyk land-leven (Amsterdam, 1710-11) includes fascinating views of gardens of the same period in the Netherlands. Such a lesser known publication as Bernhard Christoph Faust´s Zur Sonne nach Mittag sollten alle Häuser der Menschen gerichtet seyn (n.p., c. 1824) offers interesting views of the application of the English landscape garden to row houses. The two volumes of  Theatri machinarum hydraulicarumby Jacob Leupold (Leipzig, 1724-25) elucidate how to construct water fountains and show, e. g., parts of the water technique used to run the fountains of the Marly garden. Last but not least, numerous titles deal with the most important seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth century gardens in Europe, such as Rome, Firenze, Stowe, Versailles, and Schwetzingen.
Also represented in this collection are the diaries and works on garden design by the virtuoso John Evelyn (1620-1706) who was a pivotal figure in seventeenth-century intellectual life in England.
This collection consists of works from the following IDC microfiche collections:
Garden Design, 16th-19th Century
Italian Garden Design
John Evelyn – an English Virtuoso.
The works are from various libraries, among them the libraries of Dumbarton Oaks, Washington and of Leibniz University, Hannover.
This collection contains the study collection of photographs; some drawings, tracings and prints; and correspondence with friends and patrons of the Dutch painter Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912) who moved to England in 1870 where he became very famous.

Lawrence Alma-Tadema was born in Friesland, The Netherlands, in 1836. He trained in Antwerp with Baron Henri Ley (1815-1869), a painter of 16th century Flemish historical subjects, and with Louis de Taeye (1822-1890) a painter and professor of archaeology. During his honeymoon in 1863, Alma-Tadema visited Italy. He was very impressed by the archaeological remains he saw in Florence, Rome, Naples and Pompeii and his love for Roman antiquity was born. He began to acquire a reputation, particularly in England, as a painter of historical subjects. He therefore decided to move to London in 1870, and his popularity continued to grow. In 1876 he became a member of the Royal Academy. Throughout the remainder of his life he enjoyed great fame and fortune and was knighted by Queen Victoria in 1899. When he died in 1912 he was accorded the rare privilege of being buried in St. Paul's Cathedral.

The photographs
Alma-Tadema used many elements of Roman art and architecture in his paintings. He strove for historical authenticity in every small detail and in order to achieve this he made use of photographs. He had in fact collected photographs since his journey through Italy in 1863, such photographs being at the time a popular medium for archaeological documentation as well as for "Grand Tour" souvenirs. Alma-Tadema bought hundreds of photographs during his many journeys, of which many, but by no means all, are of Italian subjects. He stored these photographs, glued on cardboard mounts, in portfolios. These are sorted according to subject: Roman aqueducts, triumphal arches, Egyptian architecture, flowers and animals, etc. Details from the photographs are often to be recognized in his paintings. The names of the photographers are usually unknown because Alma-Tadema did not write their names on the mounts: he regarded the subject matter as important, not the photographs' value to art history. However, recent studies have established that among the photographers represented are such famous names as Sommer, Tuminello, Simelli, Plüschow, Salzman, Du Camp, Bonfils and Beato. The original 164 portfolios and 6 albums, containing some 5,300 photographs, together with some original drawings, tracings and prints, were donated in 1915 to the Victoria and Albert Museum. In 1947 they were transferred to Birmingham University Library.

The correspondence
In addition to the visual material, the Alma-Tadema Collection of Birmingham University Library contains letters from Lawrence Alma-Tadema (and some written by his wife Laura and daughter Anna) to friends and patrons. Letters to his friend the singer and composer Sir George Henschel (1850-1934) form a large part of the collection.