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The Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf, Oman and Central Arabia is one of the most important European primary sources for the study of the modern Gulf region from the 17th to the early 20th century. The Gazetteer was compiled and written by John Gordon Lorimer (1870-1914), an official of the Indian Civil Service. The Gazetteer was intended as handbook for British policy makers and agents in the area. The wealth of historical, political and geographical information from which Lorimer composed the Gazetteer was sourced from official documents of the British government in India and the Gulf, from British naval and military establishments and the East India Company archives, and first-hand research and surveys. It is the fullest account of the state of knowledge of the region in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and as such is still an important tool for researchers. This full-text searchable online version offers scholars and students unique possibilities to study and consult this important work.
• Number of titles: 346 • Languages used: Hebrew 266 titles, Judeo-Arabic 158 titles, Aramaic 125 titles, Arabic 1 title, English 1 title, Judeo-Persian 1 title • Title list available • MARC records are available • Location of originals: The Valmadonna Trust Library, London The world’s foremost private collection of early and rare Hebraica housed in the Valmadonna Trust Library serves as the basis for this Hebrew and Judeo-Arabic books from Baghdad collection. It comprises an unparalleled resource for the study of oriental printing, Hebrew liturgical history, Judeo-Arabic literature, and the history and culture of the most ancient Jewish Diaspora community. All of these bibliographic treasures are reproduced here for the first time.
The Lithographed Editions of Firdawsī’s Shāhnāmah is a collection of extremely rare and illustrated lithographed editions of the famous Persian epic The Book of Kings by Firdawsī. The Shāhnāmah was completed at the beginning of the eleventh century C.E. and it is both a monument of classical Persian literature and of Iranian national identity. Scholarly research on the work has mainly focused on the establishment of a faithful and reliable text. However, there are numerous “Oriental” editions that have received little attention. It has never been thoroughly studied how many of these different editions exist or what the exact nature of the known editions is. The first complete edition of the Shāhnāmah was printed in movable type. It was prepared by Turner Macan and published in four volumes in Calcutta, 1829. Besides this editio princeps, further nineteenth century editions in movable type were published by by Jules Mohl (Paris 1838-1878) and Johann August Vullers (Leiden 1877-1879), respectively. The vast majority of "Oriental" editions of the Shāhnāmah, however, were printed by way of lithography. The first lithographed edition was published in Bombay 1262/1846, another further thirty lithographed editions of the Shāhnāmah followed, most of them published in Indian cities such as Bombay, Lucknow, and Cawnpore. Five large-sized lithographed editions were published in Iran by order of Husayn Pāshā Khān Amīr Bahādur, known as Shāhnāmah-yi Bahādurī (Tehran 1319-1322/1901-1904). The lithographed Shāhnāmah editions have distinct characteristics that are particularly relevant to the the study of the growing appreciation of the work in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. First of all, each copy of an edition is potentially unique due to the specific circumstances of lithographic printing. Secondly, various editions might have different wording and might thus offer additional clues to the establishment of the text itself. Thirdly, all Shāhnāmah's lithographed editions contain illustrations adding to their popular appeal. The present collection offers the complete text of thirteen lithographed editions of the Shāhnāmah. It includes the Indian Bombay editions of 1262/1846 and 1266/1849, as well as the first Iranian edition Tehran 1265-67/1851-53 and all four of the ensuing editions published in Iran and also a selection of eight Indian editions published in the latter half of the nineteenth century. Beyond their importance as historically produced texts, some editions are noteworthy for their calligraphy, such as the 1277/1855 Bombay edition prepared by Awliyā' Samī', or the 1307/1889 Tehran edition prepared by Muhammad-Ridā Safā "Sultān al-kuttāb". Particularly the illustrations in the Iranian editions are quite appealing and have been produced by major artists of the day such as Mirzā 'Alī-Qolī Khu'ī (Tehran 1265-67/1851-53), Ustād Sattār (Tabriz 1275/1858), and Mustafà (Tehran 1307/1889).
Advisory Editor: Arnoud Vrolijk
The Middle Eastern Manuscripts Online collections consists of the following collections:
- Middle Eastern Manuscripts Online 1: Pioneer Orientalists: The Manuscript Collections of Scaliger, Raphelengius and Golius from Leiden University Libraries
- Middle Eastern Manuscripts Online 2: The Ottoman Legacy of Levinus Warner: 140 volumes from the Warner Collection, totaling 45,809 pages of Ottoman Turkish, Arabic, and Persian texts. All these manuscripts were acquired by the great scholar Levinus Warner during his stay in Istanbul from 1644 until his death in 1665
- Middle Eastern Manuscripts Online 3: Arabic Manuscripts from the Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest: The manuscript holdings of the Oriental Collection in the Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, consisting of 200 manuscripts.
Arabic Manuscripts from the manuscript holdings of the Oriental Collection in the Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest. The collection consists of 200 manuscripts with just over 300 works. In addition to 5 autographs, the highlights of the collection include: the earliest dated manuscript in the collection (Arab O. 013) a dated copy of a unique arrangement of a rare treatise written by al-Ṣāḥib Tāǧ al-Dīn (d. 707/1307) produced in the year of the author’s death; two rare Mamluk treatises on horsemanship (Arab F.2); and an anonymous compilation (Arab O. 027) about the lives of the outstanding men who lived in Medina in the 12th/18th century.
MEMO-4 includes the 150 manuscripts and a small number of printed works that form the collection of Rafi’ Shamghudi (1863-1932), a famous scholar and bibliophile from Shangoda, a town in central Dagestan. The private collection was gathered by several generations of scholars from the Shamghudi family. Rafi’ Shamghudi inherited them and added further texts on his travels to Mecca, Yemen, and Egypt. When rumours of Shamghudi’s arrest reached his hometown, scholars decided to hide the library in the basement of the local Friday mosque. The library remained hidden throughout the Soviet period and was recovered only in July 2001. The collection, with texts in Arabic and Persian, includes copies from the Timurid period. All metadata is Library of Congress-compliant.
• Number of titles: 11 • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records are available • Location of originals: various libraries This collection introduces the uniquely varied and poorly explored Russian Muslim population during one of the most dynamic periods of their history (1861-1918). Materials published in Russia both at the center and on the periphery reflect the picturesque palette of life of Muslims in the Russian Empire, as well as the positions of their public and political figures. This collection presents works written by and about Muslims. The value of this heritage is especially pertinent now that the historical and spiritual past of Muslims in Russia is being actively reconsidered.
Brill in cooperation with the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, for the first time brings together a unique collection of rare primary sources on a vital and dynamic part of the history of Turkey, Russia, the Middle East and Western Europe Russian-Ottoman Relations. During the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, the balance of power between Russia and the Ottoman Empire was constantly monitored in Western Europe, where several powers had designs of their own on some of the Ottoman territories. In Germany and France, in particular, all kinds of accounts, opinions, and plans were published that were influenced by, or aimed to influence, Russian-Ottoman relations. They include publications of relevant government documents, diplomatic reports, travel accounts that provided new details about hitherto relatively unknown regions, and fiercely political (and polemical) tracts and pamphlets designed to rally public support for one power or the other. Published across Europe over a period of two centuries, these sources provide detailed insights not only in the military ebb and flow of Russian-Ottoman relations, but also in their effects on European public opinion.

This series currently consists of 4 parts:
Part 1: The Origins 1600-1800
Part 2: Shifts in the Balance of Power, 1800-1853
Part 3: The Crimean War 1854-1856
Part 4: The End of the Empires, 1857-1914
The Origins, 1600-1800
• Number of titles: 193
• Languages used: Western languages, German, French, English
• Title list available
• MARC records available
Location of originals: National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg

Relations between the Ottoman Empire and Russia were no less conflictual in the eighteenth century: they were at war in 1736-39, 1768-74, and 1787. In the infamous Treaty of Küçük Kaynarca of 1774, the Ottomans were forced to acknowledge the independence of the Crimea (under Russian influence) and of the northern coasts of the Black Sea. It was not until the Treaty of Jassy in 1792 that peaceful relations between the Ottomans and the Russians were restored.
Shifts in the Balance of Power, 1800-1853
• Number of titles: 120
• Languages used: Western languages, German, French, English
• Title list available
• MARC records available
Location of originals: National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg

This collection includes discussions of diplomatic treaties like those of Bucharest of 1812 and Adrianople (Edirne) of 1829; the commercial and military issue of access to the Black Sea; eye-witness accounts from war theaters; and plans for, and ideas about, future confrontations. The fact that many different perspectives are represented in this collection makes it extra attractive.