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" Brill’s North-China Daily News database is extremely impressive. It presents very clear scanned images of newspapers on a user-friendly operating system.” -- Xiang Fen Ph.D., Associate Researcher, Journalism and Communication Institute, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

" An invaluable primary source for historical research on the modern period, especially China … This new Online Primary Source will enable far-reaching historical research and encourage the spirit of scholarly enquiry among historians of modern East Asia.” -- Liu Wennan Ph.D., Associate Researcher, Institute of Modern History, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

" This expanded collection is an essential source for scholars of the history of international relations in pre- and immediate post-war East Asia … This database set provides not only the daily edition, but also substantial holdings of the weekend magazines, supplements, the Municipal Gazette and books and pamphlets from the newspaper’s imprint.” -- Professor Dr. Sven Saaler, Sophia University, Japan

" An excellent additional resource. Its great value lies in the more ephemeral material not included in the Herald: in particular advertisements (of all kinds), and announcements … What you get is much more depth and texture, and also a much firmer sense of key events unfolding.” -- Professor Robert Bickers, University of Bristol

Brill’s relaunched and expanded North-China Daily News is great news for scholars of China and East Asia from the 1860s to the mid-19th century. Except for a wartime break, 1941-45, this was the most influential and informative English-language daily in East Asia. Even though it serves as a catalogue of the sins of the West in the ‘century of national humiliation’, ca.1839-1949, it is the unwitting journal of record for China’s recovery of full nationhood as it struggled against foreign incursions, warlordism, chaos, invasion and civil war to the unification of October 1949.

Extra content
North-China Daily News has a greatly expanded run of the Daily edition from 1869-1949 and some terrific extras, including unique colour holdings of the Sunday Magazine and Special Supplements, a significant run of the Municipal Gazette, organ of the Shanghai Municipal Council from 1908-1940, and a terrific selection of rare books and pamphlets from the imprint of the North-China Daily News and its parent publisher, the North-China Herald.

Uniquely broad and outspoken news coverage
The North-China Daily News is far more than an expanded form of the North-China Herald. This busy daily published around 70 percent more news than the Herald, 70 per cent more pictorial and advertising content, and around 40 percent more textual content overall. But the North-China Daily News was far more than an expanded version of the North-China Herald, because a great deal of the North-China Daily News material was unique and not republished in the Herald.

The social economy
The “Old Lady of the Bund”, as it was known to Shanghai residents, tracked all key news developments and commercial news both in China and throughout East Asia. It recorded the social life of the foreign settlements in photographs and editorial comment. It records the frenetic economy of Shanghai and the ‘Outports’ with hard-working classified ads and Personal and Wanted Notices. It advised its readers on their book choices, ushering in the moves and modern music in the Cinema and entertainment pages. There were Woman’s Pages on Mondays and Thursdays. The full-colour illustrated North China Sunday News Magazines are a unique record of settler China at ease. The Correspondence pages ran excitable and heated reader’s exchanges, most written anonymously.

Published here in full colour 300 ppi scans from original issues and grayscale, this collection offers also offers the only complete run of the works of “Sapajou”, arguably the greatest of all Shanghai’s topical artists, during his tenure at the North-China Daily News, 1923-1941. Sources: Waseda University, British Library, and Private Collection
In Japan’s network of newspapers presenting the national case for expansion and leadership in Asia, the North China Standard (in Chinese, Huabei zheng bao) stands alongside the Japan Times & Mail as a real newspaper, distributing real news written by real journalists. Derided as a propaganda rag when it first began publication in December 1919, the Standard read better, and investigated and reported better quality news to a steadily growing readership in post-WW1 China and Japan. It was also a representative newspaper chosen for international conferences and delivered gratis to all delegates.
The North China Standard was founded in December 1919 by John Russell Kennedy (1861-1928), Anglo-Irish master architect of Japan’s modern propaganda programmes. Its most immediate functions, in the wake of propaganda failures at the Paris Conference and the Treaty of Versailles granting Japan continuing rights in Shandong Province, was to argue Japan’s claim to special rights and advisory powers in Chinese affairs, to question the ability of the Chinese to govern China, and to maintain British support for the Anglo-Japanese Alliance. Throughout the 1920s it served as one of Japan’s representative newspapers at international conferences, delivered gratis to all delegates.
Sticking to Japan’s propaganda mission would have made for a dull read, and the Standard made a slow start under Satoh Kenri, (known as Henry), in 1919. However, the paper improved under the British journalist, John S. Willes in the 1920s. It took the gifted and imaginative Liverpudlian (1888-1956) George Gorman to turn the North China Standard around and make it into a real newspaper. Both Satoh and Gorman were seasoned publicists in the cause of Japan. However, Gorman’s long experience in this role convinced him that the best way to advance Japan’s cause was through polemic and debate. Under Gorman, the North China Standard served Chinese and foreign readerships intelligently and conscientiously, making this title a valuable primary source for scholars of Japan and China.

Philipp Melanchthon Online

Theologian and Humanist

• Number of titles: 31
• Languages used: German and Latin
• Title list available
• MARC records are available
Location of originals: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München; Herzog August Bibliotek, Wolfenbüttel; Melanchthonhaus, Bretten; Amsterdam University Library, Amsterdam

This collection focuses on three types of literature in the Melanchthon corpus. First, it especially includes works not contained in more recent collections of Melanchthon’s works (i.e., the Corpus Reformatorum, Supplementa Melanchthoniana, and Melanchthon Studien Ausgabe). Second, it preserves important earlier printings of works, which have been hitherto unavailable in modern sources, especially where these differ radically from later editions. Third, it contains a copy of the four volume Opera omnia, both to indicate the materials available immediately after Melanchthon’s death and to give readers access to the only index of his more well-known theological works.
• Number of titles: 208 • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records available • Location of originals: The National Library of Russia, St. Petersburg The collection illustrates the chief genres of Russian popular literature and includes chivalric tales, historical fiction and updated fairy tales, as well as stories of adventure, banditry, detectives, success, war and empire, women and gender. The collection also includes rags-to-riches tales of social mobility, adventures set in Siberia and the Caucasus, and the stories of the occult world of wizards and sorceresses. Taken together, these lively texts illustrate changing stereotypes of gender, ethnicity, and social class. Their authors also invoke historical memory, celebrating notable personages and eras of interest to their readers. From popular songs to fairy tales and war stories, the collection follows the evolution of the Russian language in its popular commercial print form, an evolution that the Bolsheviks interrupted, but one that has now resumed.
The Prize Papers archive, part of the archives of the High Court of Admiralty kept in The National Archives (TNA) Kew, is commonly regarded as one of the most valuable archives in the field of maritime history.

In the course of its many naval engagements the British Royal Navy seized numerous enemy ships. Documents pertaining to tens of thousands of these seized ships (“prizes”), Dutch and French, Spanish and Portuguese, but also Danish, Swedish, German, Italian and American have been preserved. Every ship's file contains at least one document in English: transcriptions of the interrogations by the Prize Courts of the captain and other crew members aboard ships taken as lawful prizes.

This huge collection is of interest not only to maritime historians, but also to social, economic, political and cultural historians too. The English authorities enquired about the origin, the route and planned destination, tonnage, freight and crew members, about citizenship, national allegiance, and the personal migration history of the interrogated crew members. The answers were interpreted into English, and written down by professional secretaries. This results in a wealth of information, standardized in its presentation, always in English. As the Prize Papers are international in nature, they enable comparisons between different maritime nations.

Brill has digitized the interrogations, and made them available online to researchers all over the world. Prize Papers Online provide images of each interrogation , while the answers to the fourteen most researched questions have been transcribed and stored in a searchable database. Names of places have been standardized according to authorized LoC conventions. Because of the large scope, the product is divided into three collections, each matching a (set of) war(s) in which England was involved from the second half of the seventeenth until the end of the eighteenth century, and offered separately or as a complete set to academic institutions worldwide through Brill’s online platform for research collections.

Prize Papers Online consists of:
Prize Papers Online 1: American Revolutionary War and Fourth Anglo-Dutch War.
Prize Papers Online 2: Seven Years' War and War of the Austrian Succession .
Prize Papers Online 3: First, Second and Third Anglo-Dutch War and War of the Spanish Succession .
Prize Papers Online Atlas (Open Access) .
Prize Papers Online 1 contains approximately 7,000 interrogations of members of the crew of ships taken during the American Revolutionary War and Fourth Anglo-Dutch War (ca. 1775-1784). It shows images of each interrogation (of two, three, sometimes even six or more pages). Answers to the fourteen most researched questions are transcribed and stored in a searchable database.

The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), began as a war between the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Thirteen Colonies, but gradually grew into a war between Britain on one side and the newly formed United States, France, and its allies the Dutch Republic, and Spain, on the other. The Fourth Anglo-Dutch War (1780–1784) was a conflict between the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Dutch Republic. The war, tangentially related to the American Revolutionary War, broke out over British and Dutch disagreements on the legality and conduct of Dutch trade with Britain's enemies in that war.

This collection is part of Prize Papers Online (PPO).
Prize Papers Online 2 contains approximately 6,000 interrogations of members of the crew of ships taken during the War of the Austrian Succession and Seven Years’ War (ca. 1739-1763). It shows images of each interrogation (of two, three, sometimes even six or more pages). Answers to the fourteen most researched questions are transcribed and stored in a searchable database.

The War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) involved most of the powers of Europe over the question of Maria Theresa's succession to the realms of the House of Habsburg. The Seven Years' War took place between 1754 and 1763 with the main conflict being in the seven-year period 1756–1763. It involved most of the great powers of the time and was driven by the antagonism resulting from overlapping interests in colonial and trade empires, and from territorial and hegemonial conflicts in the Holy Roman Empire.

This collection is part of Prize Papers Online (PPO).

Prize Papers Online: Atlas

Researching the Maritime Sector in Early Modern Europe and North America

Aimed at researchers and students, the Prize Papers Online: Atlas is dedicated to show the richness of the Prize Papers, considered to be one of the world’s most important maritime archives.

The British fought many naval wars, and during these wars they seized enemy ships. Documents pertaining to tens of thousands of these seized ships (“prizes”) have been preserved. Every ship's file contains at least one document in English: the interrogations by the Prize Courts of the captain and a number of other crew members of ships taken as lawful prizes.

Prize Papers Online: Atlas offers the possibility to investigate a sample of the Prize Papers’ interrogations. Providing a wide variety of information about ships and their crews, the interrogations constitute a crucial section of the Prize Paper Archive, which gives an unprecedented insight in the workings of the maritime sector during the Age of Sail.

The map tool allows you to search the data and create your own maps. The Prize Papers Online: Atlas also provides an insight in potential research possibilities. It gives some interesting background stories to individuals that can be found in the interrogations and shows examples of existing research based on the Prize Papers. A selection of high-quality scans of the original interrogations are also shown.

The website is based on two databases: Prize Papers Online (Brill) and the database created by the ESRC-funded project led by Jelle van Lottum.

The data available on Prize Papers Online: Atlas covers the period between 1775 and 1783.
• Number of titles: 529
• Languages used: German and Latin
• Title list available
• MARC records are available
Location of originals: Johannes a Lasco Library at Emden; Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Bremen; Herzog August Bibliothek, Wolfenbüttel; Koninklijke Bibliotheek, The Hague; Bibliotheek der Rijksuniversiteit Groningen; Bibliotheek Theologische Universiteit Kampen; Universiteitsbibliotheek Amsterdam; Universiteitsbibliotheek Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam; Universiteitsbibliotheek Leiden; Universiteitsbibliotheek Maastricht; Universiteitsbibliotheek Utrecht

In the sixteenth century, the seaport town of Emden at the heart of East Friesland grew into the “mother church” of Dutch Calvinism, which was the driving force behind the Dutch Revolt. Concurrently, in neighbouring North-Western Germany the so-called “second Reformation” took place, that is, the calvinizing of Lutheran lands. From 1555 onwards, the Lutheran cities of Bremen and Hamburg became the scenes of sacramentarian controversies which had an impact far beyond their borders. They marked a critical phase in the transition of German left wing Lutherans to (a form of) Calvinism and in the consolidation processes of the Lutheran and Reformed confessions in North-Western Europe. This collection has a strong focus on the cities in which early modern North German Reformed Protestantism was centered: Bremen and Emden. It presents a nearly exhaustive array of sources on their theologians and their works, correspondence and biographies, on the Bremen Academy, the confessionalization process, and the general and ecclesiastical historiography of the region.