Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for :

  • Online Primary Source x
  • Art History x
Clear All
Restricted Access

Arkyves

Online Reference Tool for the History of Culture

Edited by Hans Brandhorst

http://arkyves.org/
To enquire about this product, or arrange a free 30-day institutional trial, please contact our Sales Department at sales-nl@brill.com (outside the Americas) or sales-us@brill.com (the Americas).

Arkyves is both a unique database of images and texts and a meeting place for everyone who wants to study imagery and publish about it. All visual and textual sources are made accessible with the help of the multilingual vocabulary for cultural content of the Iconclass system. By using this system it has been made possible to find and retrieve images and texts from various sources on a specific topic.
By using Arkyves it is currently possible to access more than 500.000 images, texts, etc. from libraries and museums in many countries among them the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, the Netherlands Institute for Art History (RKD), the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel, and the university libraries of Milan, Utrecht and Glasgow . More collections will follow in the near future. The database contains a link to the images which are available in open access.
Arkyves is both a research tool for art historians and book historians, as well as a tool to facilitate the process of describing images.
1) Arkyves demo: Product information Information about 'Arkyves, Reference Tool for the History of Culture': what is it, how can you use it, the different tools, future developments, and more. Watch it here
2) Arkyves demo: Searching for content in Arkyves Examples of the different kinds of search possibilities in Arkyves. Watch it here
Restricted Access

Art Sales Catalogues Online

Online Access to Complete Sales Catalogues from 1600-1900

Edited by Various Editors

Now available: ASCO User Guide.
The Art Sales Catalogues Online (ASCO) publication offers easy access to complete historical art sales catalogues for the period 1600 to 1900. Lugt's Répertoire Online database has been included in this publication and serves as the "entrance gate" to the catalogues.
The earliest art sales catalogues, also known as auction catalogues, appeared in the early 17th century, as simple leaflets. Over time, the catalogues grew into extensive, richly-illustrated publications. The catalogues are intriguing not only from the point of view of Art History, but also provide glimpses into the economic and sociological climate of the time.
Much research in the field of Art History relies on access to art sales catalogues. Art Sales Catalogues online providing access to thousands of complete sales catalogues from the period 1600-1900, combines a wealth of information from art sales catalogues with the reference facility of Lugt’s Répertoire.
In his impressive four-volume work Répertoire des catalogues de ventes publiques intéressant l’art ou la curiosité ("Repertory of Catalogues of Public Sale concerned with Art or Objets d'art"), Frits Lugt (Amsterdam 1884–Paris1970) covered the period 1600 to 1925. In Lugt’s Répertoire, the catalogues are arranged in strict chronological order and provide meticulous details of auctions, as well as recording annotations written in the catalogues. Lugt also indicates the library where the catalogue may be consulted. The online edition of Lugt’s work for the period 1600-1900 is the “entrance gate” to Arts Sales Catalogues Online.

Search Options in ASCO: • FULL TEXT SEARCH • Lugt number • Date of Sale • Place of Sale • Provenance • Auction House • Content • Copies • Keyword • Getty Provenance Index number • ESTC number

Product Information: • Online access to art sales catalogues from 1600-1900 • Includes Lugt’s Répertoire Online • Currently available: 65482 Lugt records (1600-1900), 33,098 scanned catalogues (1600-1900) • Last supplement: April 2018, 347 catalogues from the Frick Art Reference Library, New York.
New supplements will be added regularly. The next supplement will consist of catalogues from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Please visit our ASCO website at http://primarysources.brillonline.com/browse/art-sales-catalogues-online
Restricted Access
Source material for the study of Czechoslovak avant-garde and architecture in the period before the Second World War is very difficult to find. As is the case for comparable material in the West, this difficulty is due on the one hand to the small editions and on the other to the political and cultural situation after 1945. It is as though the political division of Europe not only disrupted the cultural continuity but also obliterated the cultural memory of Western Europe. This is the more remarkable because thinking in international terms was one of the characteristics of the avant-garde movement.

Early in the twentieth century the influence of the Wagner school on architecture was very strong. The Czechoslovak adherents of this school undertook the battle for a new architecture in their country. A number of architects who had become aware of French Cubism very early, arrived at a new form of architecture comparable to that of German expressionism after the First World War. Starting in 1918, there was a rapid growth of international contacts and exchanges. Contacts with The Netherlands (Van Doesburg), Germany (Bauhaus), Russia (Constructivism), and France (Le Corbusier) made Czechoslovakia an equal within the European movement for a new architecture. A comparable development can be seen in the arts and literature. The influence of modern French poetry and later that of Surrealism was of great importance in this respect.

This collection contains a number of leading periodicals and monographs with special importance for the study of the Czechoslovak avant-garde and architecture in the period before the Second World War. It gives an excellent picture of developments during this period.

Otakar Máčel, Technical University Delft
Restricted Access

Classic Mexican Cinema Online

From the Archives of the Filmoteca of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

• Number of images: ca. 40,000 (full color) • MARC21 catalog records are available • Location of originals: Filmoteca, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) Mexican cinema, from its beginnings in the late 1890s to its Golden Age (1930s to 1960), was consistently the largest and most important of all the Spanish-speaking countries. During its heyday, the Mexican film industry produced an average of one hundred films annually and supplied screen entertainment to both domestic audiences and international markets in Latin America, the United States, and Europe. The Golden Age of Mexican cinema is illuminated in this collection of popular movie periodicals. Not only does it include chief magazines such as Cinema Reporter (1943-1965) and Cine Mundial (1951-1955), it also features two extremely rare issues of El Cine Gráfico from 1935 and copies of the weekly El Mundo Ilustrado (1902-1910), an arts magazine that also contained notes on movies. The true extent of the popularity of Mexican film is illustrated by Cinelandia (1931-1947), which was published in Hollywood both in Spanish and in English. This collection also includes some fifty rare lobby cards, which were used to advertise a film. Finally, for the first time this collection gives access to the personal scrap book of Fernando de Fuentes (1894-1958), one of the leading Latin-American filmmakers to this day. It contains reviews, movie stills, programs, and advertisements, shedding a unique light on the career of this pioneering director. The sources in this collection, heretofore only accessible in the archives of the Filmoteca de la UNAM in Mexico City, will be invaluable to researchers and students working on Film and Media Studies, Latin American Studies, and many other aspects of the historical, social, and political impact of cinema.
Restricted Access

Cuban Culture and Cultural Relations, 1959-

The Vertical Archive of the Casa de las Américas, Part 1: “Casa y Cultura”

• Unique access to 45,000 documents
• Covering almost 60 years of cultural relations between Revolutionary Cuba and abroad
• Full-text search functionality
• Including MARC21 catalog records

Casa de las Américas in Havana, Cuba, ranks among the most renowned cultural institutions in Latin America and the Caribbean. Ever since its creation in 1959, it has been a host to thousands of writers and artists from throughout the region. It has published countless books and articles, organized conferences, concerts, expositions, theatre productions and numerous cultural contests. Founded just three months after the Cuban Revolution, it quickly became a fundamental link between the cultural vanguard in Latin America and the Caribbean on the one hand and a diplomatically isolated Cuba on the other. Over the course of almost six decades it has amassed a vast amount of information, thus creating a unique record to study the history of both the institution itself as a cultural hub, but also that of the protagonists of a remarkable era.

Much of the information is preserved in the present “Casa y Cultura” section of the so-called Archivo Vertical at Casa de las Américas library. This section contains some 45,000 documents organized in 545 folders, covering such diverse materials as articles, newspaper clippings, cable messages, interviews, conference memorabilia, etc., collected from 1959 onward. Together they document the activities of the institution both in Cuba and beyond, bearing testimony to the conflicts and passions of a turbulent time. Conferences and controversies, manifestos and open letters combine to shed a light on a vibrant cultural history, which is now accessible for the first time from new and unexpected angles.

Beginnings
The archive’s genesis was somewhat random; it started out collecting newspaper clippings (an external agency was in charge of compiling them) in order to keep track of the various activities of the Casa de las Américas. Gradually the collection began to grow as donors and librarians from different countries sent press clippings and other documents to the institute. Employees and researchers at the Casa itself contributed as well. Much of this constitutes ephemeral material, difficult to obtain as it derived from non-indexed sources (e.g. newspaper clippings) or consisted of unpublished articles (e.g. press dispatches). The employees at Casa de las Américas would use these documents for their own information or they would serve as promotional material for the different departments within the institute. Once they had served their purpose they would be sent to the library to be archived. In some cases there are notes in the margins or senders’ requests, an interesting aspect when we consider the importance of some of its authors.

Writers and artists
Among the many documents, the programs of the monthly events at Casa de las Américas stand out ( Programa del Mes). They allow us to establish a record of all public activities organized by the Casa since its founding. Other documents give insight in the plethora of colloquiums, meetings and conferences where intellectuals and artists from across Latin America and the Caribbean met. Here we find information about such illustrious figures as Miguel Angel Asturias, Alejo Carpentier, Fernando Benitez, Carlos Fuentes, Miguel Otero Silva, Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre, Dario Fo and Mercedes Sosa, to name but a few. We also find information about the different departments of the institute: Theatre, Music, Visual Arts, Centre for Literary Research, Centre for Research on the Caribbean and Study Guides (on women, Latinos in the United States, cultures of Latin America and people of Afro-American descent). Also highly significant are the extensive files on the famous literary prize of the Casa de las Américas: the Premio Literario Casa de las Americas, which is by far the oldest and most ambitious one in the region.

Finally, the present section of the Archivo Vertical contains records about Haydee Santamaría, one of the most renowned women of the Cuban Revolution and the founder and president (until her death in 1980) of Casa de las Américas.

Jorge Fornet, Havana
Restricted Access
• Number of titles: Part 1: 13 Part 2: 20 Part 3: 24 • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records available Russian Cinematographic Press (1907- 1918) is a unique collection of Russian film periodicals published during the last decade of the Tsarist regime. The collection includes sophisticated, bimonthly periodicals as well as more popular weeklies released by the major Russian film studios. Containing, amongst other things, interviews with movie stars and screenplays that are now irretrievably lost, these journals will prove an invaluable source of information for anyone interested in the silent movie era and Russia’s entertainment industry at the eve of the Revolution.
Restricted Access

Historical Garden Design Online

Sources from the 16th to the 19th centuries

The collection includes such watershed works as Salomon de Caus´  Hortus Palatinus (1620), Dominicus Barrière's  Villa Aldobrandina Tusculana sive varij illius hortorum et fontium prospectus (1647), Giovanni Battista Falda's  Li Giardini di Roma(1680), and Christian Cay Lorenz Hirschfeld´s  Theorie der Gartenkunst(1779-85). Also included are the lesser known, but nevertheless, important works, such as Heinrich Hesse´s  Neue Garten-Lust(1696) and  Die Gartenkunst(1797) by J. F. Blotz (pseudonym of F.Ch. Touchy).
Johann Gottfried Grohmann´s  Ideenmagazin für Liebhaber von Gärten(Leipzig, 1796-1802) offers insights into garden ornaments used for well-to-do gardens. The Dutch publication  Het vermakelyk land-leven (Amsterdam, 1710-11) includes fascinating views of gardens of the same period in the Netherlands. Such a lesser known publication as Bernhard Christoph Faust´s Zur Sonne nach Mittag sollten alle Häuser der Menschen gerichtet seyn (n.p., c. 1824) offers interesting views of the application of the English landscape garden to row houses. The two volumes of  Theatri machinarum hydraulicarumby Jacob Leupold (Leipzig, 1724-25) elucidate how to construct water fountains and show, e. g., parts of the water technique used to run the fountains of the Marly garden. Last but not least, numerous titles deal with the most important seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth century gardens in Europe, such as Rome, Firenze, Stowe, Versailles, and Schwetzingen.
Also represented in this collection are the diaries and works on garden design by the virtuoso John Evelyn (1620-1706) who was a pivotal figure in seventeenth-century intellectual life in England.
This collection consists of works from the following IDC microfiche collections:
Garden Design, 16th-19th Century
Italian Garden Design
John Evelyn – an English Virtuoso.
The works are from various libraries, among them the libraries of Dumbarton Oaks, Washington and of Leibniz University, Hannover.
Restricted Access

History of Modern Russian and Ukrainian Art Online

Monographs and Serials, 1907-1930

The collection documents the history of modern Russian and Ukrainian art. It encompasses critical literature, illustrated books, and art periodicals. The collection contains texts by such artists as Wassily Kandinsky, Pavel Filonov, Kazimir Malevich and Anatolii Petrytskyi; publications of art groups such as the Jack of Diamonds (Bubnovyi valet) and Màkovets; theoretical tracts by Nikolai Tarabukin and Boris Kushner; and books by well-known critics such as Iakov Tugendkhol'd, Erikh Gollerbakh, and Nikolai Punin. The collection also offers a selection of early 20th century art-related serials. These historical sources of pre- and post-revolutionary art reflect the diversity of artistic thought in the first thirty years of the 20th century, the intense discussions about the nature of the new art, its form, and its aims. The publication contains 158 monographs and 57 serials.
Restricted Access
• Number of titles: 5 • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records available • Location of originals: The National Library of Russia Nothing illuminates the lost world of late Imperial Russia better than the pictorial magazines of the era. The illustrated weeklies gathered in this collection open a wide window on Russian cultural, social, and political life. Their editors traced the sweep of the Russian imagination at the apogee of Russian cultural power from the peak years of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy to the modernist era and the chaos of 1917. They captured imperial expansion, cultural innovation, high fashion, graphic arts, performing arts, grand funerals and anniversaries, occasions of state, wonders of science, and domestic and foreign politics. In addition, the weeklies inscribed the changing image of Russia’s great cities, its landscapes, and its multinational citizenry, together with literary life and a visual and verbal chronicle of all and sundry occasions and events. Each issue of these magazines contains surprises for historians and scholars of culture alike.
Restricted Access
• Number of titles: Fond 2307, opis’ 1-2 and Fond 2308, opis’ 1 - from the Russian State Archive of Literature and Art (RGALI), Moscow • Dates: (inclusive): 1916-1950 • Languages used: Russian, Yiddish, English, French, German, Hebrew, Ukrainian, Belarus, Georgian, Latvian • EAD finding aids are available • Location of originals: the Russian State Archive of Literature and Art (RGALI) in Moscow This collection of archival documents contains material that describes the history of Soviet culture and theater, Jewish avant-garde art and the Kremlin’s policy toward Jewish society and culture from 1919 until 1949. Among the artists associated with GOSET are Marc Chagall, Natan Al’tman, Isaac Rabinovich, Robert Falk, Aleksandr Tyshler, and others. The collection contains correspondence with ministries, state organizations, and authors; administrative-managerial documents; plays performed by or submitted to the theater (many of which have never been published); notes written by the censors; musical items for productions; press clippings about the theater; posters, programs and librettos; photographs of GOSET productions and of the actors off -stage; as well as personal documents of Alekseĭ Granovskiĭ, Solomon Mikhoėls, V.M. Zuskin and other members of the troupe.