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Mobilizing East Asia Online

Newspapers, magazines and books from the 1900s-1950s

Mobilizing East Asia offers a carefully selected collection of extremely rare, many times even unique English-language newspapers, magazines and pamphlets published inside Asia, following the descent into war in East and South-East Asia from the turn of the twentieth century to the 1950s. This exciting collection of newspapers and illustrated magazines, often in colour, is now available online for the first time, exclusively from Brill. The Collection offers access to unique primary source material which can be used to pursue research topics in modern history, Asian studies, politics and war studies. Features and Benefits: -- English-language newspapers and magazines published in East Asia - Approx. 100,000 pages of over 1,200 print items - All content fully searchable - Reproduced in 300 dpi full colour - Sourced from extremely rare, often even unique originals - Brill has the exclusive online rights to this material for years to come - Represents the most complete holdings available of these sources - Updates included, at no additional cost For a detailed list of the contents, please see the links below (online edition)

Edited by Various Editors

The Chinese Students’ Monthly is the first magazine published by Chinese students in the United States from 1906-1931. This publication became the official organ of the enlarged Chinese student organization: The Chinese Students’ Alliance in the U.S. Many important historical figures among Chinese students in the U.S. during the early 20th century, such as Sao-Ke Alfred Sze, Wellington Koo, Hu Shi, Chao Yuanren, Xie Bingxin, contributed their articles to this magazine. The magazine was a most influential publication among the Chinese students in the U.S. at that time. The overseas Chinese has been an emerging area of scholarly research. This magazine includes valuable information for scholars in this particular field. During its publication, the periodical discussed important movements in China during that period of time: education, social, industrial, agricultural, political, and economical, etc. In addition, the period (1906-1931) during which the magazine was published happened to be an important turning period for modern Chinese history. The Chinese Students' Monthly Online, a full-text searchable online product, makes this primary source available to scholars and interested readers on modern China.
This online product is a result of collaboration between Cornell University Library and Brill. It is, to the best of our knowledge, the most comprehensive collection of the magazine so far. This online collection of The Chinese Students’ Monthly includes 25 volumes from Volume 2 to Volume 26 as we have not found any reference on Volume 1. In addition, we were not able to get a copy of Issue 8 in Volume 12, Issues 3, 4, 5 and 6 in Volume 17, Issues 7 and 8 in Volume 25 and Issues 2, 3, 4, 7, and 8 in Volume 26. If any individual or library has a copy of any of these issues, either on paper or microfilm or any format, please let us know so that we could make this collection more complete.
Translations of the Peking Gazette Online is a comprehensive database of approximately 8,500 pages of English-language renderings of official edicts and memorials from the Qing dynasty that cover China’s long nineteenth century from the Macartney Mission in 1793 to the abdication of the last emperor in 1912. As the mouthpiece of the government, the Peking Gazette is the authoritative source for information about the Manchu state and its Han subjects as they collectively grappled with imperial decline, re-engaged with the wider world, and began mapping the path to China’s contemporary rise.
The Peking Gazette was a unique publication that allows contemporary readers to explore the contours, boundaries, and geographies of modern Chinese history. Contained within its pages are the voices of Manchu emperors, Han officials, gentry leaders, and peasant spokesmen as they discussed and debated the most important political, social, and cultural movements, trends, and events of their day. As such, the Gazette helps us understand the policies and attitudes of the emperors, the ideas and perspectives of the officials, and the mentality and worldviews of several hundred million Han, Mongol, Manchu, Muslim, and Tibetan subjects of the Great Qing Empire.
The dozens of British scholars, missionaries, and consular officials who created this treasure trove of translated Qing documents did so for variety of different reasons. Robert Morrison (1782-1834), the first Protestant missionary to China, honed his classical Chinese by translating the Gazette in preparation for his rendering of the Bible; Sir John Francis Davis (1795-1890), the future governor of Hong Kong, translated the Gazette for the East India Company in Canton during the height of the opium trade; the missionaries Walter Henry Medhurst and William C. Milne, by contrast, sought to understand the Christian-inspired Taiping Civil War (1851-64) by studying and translating the Gazette; the majority of the translators, however, served on the staff of the British consulate in Beijing and followed the lead of Sir Thomas Francis Wade (1818-1895), who decoded the Gazette as a form of intelligence gathering for the British government and published them for the global reading public. However, nineteenth century British scholars, missionaries, and officials did not translate the entirety of the gazette into English.
Culled from a variety of publications, including the Indo-Chinese Gleaner, the Canton Register, the Chinese Repository, and the North China Herald, this full-text searchable database is the largest, most comprehensive collection of English translations of the Peking Gazette in the world. It contains vital information on a wide range of topics, including the Opium War and other military conflicts between China and the West, the Taiping Rebellion and other peasant insurrections, the Self-Strengthening Movement and other Qing reform efforts, and thousands upon thousands of official documents that contain information about the mundane details of everyday life in nineteenth-century China and thrilling accounts of unprecedented events in late imperial times. There is no better source for readers who want to understand the interplay of complex political themes, social movements, and cultural ideas in late imperial China.
This database has been compiled by Dr. Lane J. Harris, Furman University. Dr. Harris would like to thank the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland for permission to reproduce the translations by John Francis Davis; the British Library for permission to include portions of their copy of The Cycle: A Political and Literary Review; and the Center for Research Libraries for their assistance in acquiring microfilm versions of the North China Herald, the Canton Register, and the China Mail.
As a special feature of this database, it is accompanied by a primary sourcebook, available through separate purchase, entitled The Peking Gazette: A Reader in Nineteenth-Century Chinese History by Dr. Harris. The reader contains scholarly introductions to thematic chapters organized around the most important events and themes in modern Chinese history for use in undergraduate and graduate classes.