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• Number of titles: 19 • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records available • Location of originals: K.D. Ushinski State Scientifi c Pedagogical Library, Moscow National Library of Russia, St. Petersburg The material gathered here offers a unique insight into one of the most important and characteristic areas of socializing the young in early Soviet Russia, and a window into the mentality of the `first Soviet generations’ as well. This so-called movement for ‘socialisation through play’ and ‘rational leisure’ was documented in many hundreds of publications, both in periodicals (for example, Doshkol’noe obrazovanie [Pre-School Education], Prosveshchenie na transporte [Education in Railway Schools], Na putik novoi shkole [On the Road to the New School], and Pedologiya), and in separate short books and brochures. The selection here, taken from materials held in the Russian State Library and in the Ushinsky Pedagogical Library in Moscow, gives a representative overview of the different trends in children leisure activities and games and runs chronologically from 1917 to the late 1930s.

Cold War Intelligence

The Secret War Between the U.S. and the USSR, 1945-1991

Edited by Matthew M. Aid

This unique collection of well over 2,300 formerly classified U.S. government documents (most of them classified Top Secret or higher) provides readers for the first time with the documentary record of the successes and failures of the U.S. intelligence community in its efforts to spy on the Soviet Union during the Cold War. This document collection covers the period from the end of World War II in 1945 until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, but also includes a number of formerly classified historical reports and articles written by U.S. intelligence historians since the end of the Cold War.

CIA Parachute Drops Inside the USSR
This collection contains thousands of pages of previously unpublished intelligence reports, including for the first time declassified documents concerning the abortive attempts by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) to parachute agents into the USSR between 1949 and 1954; new details of dozens of previously classified aerial reconnaissance overflights of the Soviet Union conducted by U.S. aircraft between 1949 and 1960; dozens of formerly Top Secret documents concerning Soviet attacks on U.S. military and civilian aircraft between 1945 and 1983; and over fifty formerly secret CIA intelligence estimates on the Soviet Union covering a wide range of topics ranging from Soviet military capabilities to the Kremlin’s domestic and economic policies.

Thirty years of research
This documentary collection, obtained over the course of thirty years of research at the U.S. National Archives in Washington, D.C. and other archival repositories, is essential reading for students and researchers seeking to better understand how secret intelligence informed and shaped U.S. and NATO defense and foreign policy towards the Soviet Union during the Cold War.

Number of documents: 2,360
Number of pages: 21,700

Auxiliary aids:
- Introductory essay
- Glossary of acronyms
- Glossary of organizations
- Glossary of personalities
- Cold War chronology
- Bibliography

Sourcing archives:
- National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland
- CIA-CREST database
- Harry S. Truman Library, Independence, Missouri
- Dwight D. Eisenhower Library, Abilene, Kansas
- John F. Kennedy Library, Boston, Massachusetts
- Lyndon B. Johnson Library, Austin, Texas
- Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library, Yorba Linda, California
- Gerald R. Ford Library, Ann Arbor, Michigan
- Jimmy Carter Presidential Library, Atlanta, Georgia
- Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Simi Valley, California
- Hoover Institution Archives, Palo Alto, California
- Library of Congress Manuscript Division, Washington, D.C.
- George C. Marshall Research Library, Lexington, Virginia
- General Douglas MacArthur Memorial Library, Norfolk, Virginia
- National Archives of the United Kingdom, Kew, England

See also the companion collections: U.S. Intelligence on Europe, 1945-1995, U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991, U.S. Intelligence on the Middle East, 1945-2009, and Weapons of Mass Destruction.
• Number of titles: 13 • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records available • Location of originals: National Library of Russia, St. Petersburg This collection comprises unique material on sports and physical culture in Russia, 1891-1919 and is particularly significant because sports provided opportunities for transitions from tradition to modernity: athletic competition broke down class barriers, brought women into public spaces, and encouraged new modes of behavior and self-presentation. Sports are essential to the evolution of the modern personality in terms of health, competitiveness and team play. The collection offers extraordinary sources for researchers into a variety of topics. Tourism, an important growth field in academic studies, relates directly to sports. Most significantly, contemporary interest in sexuality is informed by sports periodicals. Not only are gender roles transformed through sports, but the visuals in these publications illustrate emergent feminine and masculine ideals.
• Number of titles: 19 • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records are available • Location of originals: National Library of Russia, Russian Academy of Sciences Library This collection of writings reveals the eventful history of Russia during the revolutionary era, from the perspective of metropolitan and provincial newspapers and journals published by the most radical political forces. Furthermore, these materials shed new light on the relationship of the anarchists with the Bolsheviks and the Soviet State, and also reveal the impact of anarchist ideas on the literature and art of the period. The newspapers and journals from Kiev, Kharkov and Krasnoyarsk presented in this collection are particularly rare documents, since most anarchist publications from the province have not survived.
Brill offers two collections of Russian military intelligence on Asia, namely the Archive Series and the Secret Prints. Together, they comprise a wealth of hitherto virtually unknown data about Asia that were gathered before the 20th century by explorers, military attachés, diplomats, academics, and others.
• Dates (inclusive): 1651-1917
• Dates (bulk): 1850-1917
• Languages used: Russian and French, also German and English, Chinese, Latin, Dutch, Japanese, Arabic, Turkish, Italian, Greek, Persian, Korean, Mongolian and Norwegian
• EAD finding aids are available
Location of Originals: Rossiĭ skiĭ gosudarstvennyĭ voennoistoricheskiĭ arkhiv (RGVIA), Moscow. Fonds 444-451

The 19th century was a time of rapid Russian expansion in Asia. While its western borders were largely fixed in the wake of the Napoleonic Wars, the Romanov autocracy still found many outlets for its imperial energies in the East. Imperial Russia’s Asian march coincided with a revolution in intelligence. Gathering and analyzing such intelligence also became much more comprehensive, almost encyclopedic. It entailed not only the armed forces and the terrain of all potential adversaries, but also political, economic, ethnographic, and much other data.
The collection Archive series, 1651-1917 contains the following parts:
1. A threat from the Far East (China, Japan, Korea)
2. The Eastern question (Turkey, Palestine, Arabia & Syria)
3. The Great Game in Central Asia (Persia (Iran), Afghanistan)
• Publication Dates: 1883-1914
• Languages used: Materials in Russian
• EAD finding aids are available
Location of Originals: National Library of Russia, Saint Petersburg

One of the most remarkable pre-revolutionary Orientological publications is the little-known, classified “Collection of Geographical, Topographical and Geographical Materials on Asia” (Sbornik geografi cheskikh, topografi cheskikh i statisticheskikh materialov po Azii). Issued by the Russian General Staff between 1883 and 1914 in 87 thick volumes and 9 supplements (averaging about 300 pages each), the journal’s purpose was to disseminate to senior tsarist military commanders important scholarship about the continent written by Russian and Western explorers, officers, and academics. The bulk of the Secret Prints consists of first-hand accounts composed by contemporary travelers to lesser-known reaches of Asia. Most were Russian army officers, many of whom had extensive training in geography and related disciplines. Among the more illustrious authors are Nikolai Przhevalskii, Aleksei Kuropatkin, Nikolai Ermolov, Gustav Mannerheim, Lavr Kornilov, and Andrei Snesarev. Other articles range from attaché and diplomatic dispatches to histories of tsarist plans for the invasion of India, the siege of Herat, and European campaigns against China. Together, they comprise a unique and largely untapped source for 19th-century Asia.
Brill in cooperation with the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, for the first time brings together a unique collection of rare primary sources on a vital and dynamic part of the history of Turkey, Russia, the Middle East and Western Europe Russian-Ottoman Relations. During the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, the balance of power between Russia and the Ottoman Empire was constantly monitored in Western Europe, where several powers had designs of their own on some of the Ottoman territories. In Germany and France, in particular, all kinds of accounts, opinions, and plans were published that were influenced by, or aimed to influence, Russian-Ottoman relations. They include publications of relevant government documents, diplomatic reports, travel accounts that provided new details about hitherto relatively unknown regions, and fiercely political (and polemical) tracts and pamphlets designed to rally public support for one power or the other. Published across Europe over a period of two centuries, these sources provide detailed insights not only in the military ebb and flow of Russian-Ottoman relations, but also in their effects on European public opinion.

This series currently consists of 4 parts:
Part 1: The Origins 1600-1800
Part 2: Shifts in the Balance of Power, 1800-1853
Part 3: The Crimean War 1854-1856
Part 4: The End of the Empires, 1857-1914
• Number of titles: 193
• Languages used: Western languages, German, French, English
• Title list available
• MARC records available
Location of originals: National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg

Relations between the Ottoman Empire and Russia were no less conflictual in the eighteenth century: they were at war in 1736-39, 1768-74, and 1787. In the infamous Treaty of Küçük Kaynarca of 1774, the Ottomans were forced to acknowledge the independence of the Crimea (under Russian influence) and of the northern coasts of the Black Sea. It was not until the Treaty of Jassy in 1792 that peaceful relations between the Ottomans and the Russians were restored.

Russian-Ottoman Relations Online, Part 2

Shifts in the Balance of Power, 1800-1853

• Number of titles: 120
• Languages used: Western languages, German, French, English
• Title list available
• MARC records available
Location of originals: National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg

This collection includes discussions of diplomatic treaties like those of Bucharest of 1812 and Adrianople (Edirne) of 1829; the commercial and military issue of access to the Black Sea; eye-witness accounts from war theaters; and plans for, and ideas about, future confrontations. The fact that many different perspectives are represented in this collection makes it extra attractive.