Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 30 items for :

  • Online Primary Source x
  • Slavic and Eurasian Studies x
Clear All
• Number of titles: 19 • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records available • Location of originals: K.D. Ushinski State Scientifi c Pedagogical Library, Moscow National Library of Russia, St. Petersburg The material gathered here offers a unique insight into one of the most important and characteristic areas of socializing the young in early Soviet Russia, and a window into the mentality of the `first Soviet generations’ as well. This so-called movement for ‘socialisation through play’ and ‘rational leisure’ was documented in many hundreds of publications, both in periodicals (for example, Doshkol’noe obrazovanie [Pre-School Education], Prosveshchenie na transporte [Education in Railway Schools], Na putik novoi shkole [On the Road to the New School], and Pedologiya), and in separate short books and brochures. The selection here, taken from materials held in the Russian State Library and in the Ushinsky Pedagogical Library in Moscow, gives a representative overview of the different trends in children leisure activities and games and runs chronologically from 1917 to the late 1930s.

Cold War Intelligence

The Secret War Between the U.S. and the USSR, 1945-1991

Edited by Matthew M. Aid

This unique collection of well over 2,300 formerly classified U.S. government documents (most of them classified Top Secret or higher) provides readers for the first time with the documentary record of the successes and failures of the U.S. intelligence community in its efforts to spy on the Soviet Union during the Cold War. This document collection covers the period from the end of World War II in 1945 until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, but also includes a number of formerly classified historical reports and articles written by U.S. intelligence historians since the end of the Cold War.

CIA Parachute Drops Inside the USSR
This collection contains thousands of pages of previously unpublished intelligence reports, including for the first time declassified documents concerning the abortive attempts by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) to parachute agents into the USSR between 1949 and 1954; new details of dozens of previously classified aerial reconnaissance overflights of the Soviet Union conducted by U.S. aircraft between 1949 and 1960; dozens of formerly Top Secret documents concerning Soviet attacks on U.S. military and civilian aircraft between 1945 and 1983; and over fifty formerly secret CIA intelligence estimates on the Soviet Union covering a wide range of topics ranging from Soviet military capabilities to the Kremlin’s domestic and economic policies.

Thirty years of research
This documentary collection, obtained over the course of thirty years of research at the U.S. National Archives in Washington, D.C. and other archival repositories, is essential reading for students and researchers seeking to better understand how secret intelligence informed and shaped U.S. and NATO defense and foreign policy towards the Soviet Union during the Cold War.

Number of documents: 2,360
Number of pages: 21,700

Auxiliary aids:
- Introductory essay
- Glossary of acronyms
- Glossary of organizations
- Glossary of personalities
- Cold War chronology
- Bibliography

Sourcing archives:
- National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland
- CIA-CREST database
- Harry S. Truman Library, Independence, Missouri
- Dwight D. Eisenhower Library, Abilene, Kansas
- John F. Kennedy Library, Boston, Massachusetts
- Lyndon B. Johnson Library, Austin, Texas
- Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library, Yorba Linda, California
- Gerald R. Ford Library, Ann Arbor, Michigan
- Jimmy Carter Presidential Library, Atlanta, Georgia
- Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Simi Valley, California
- Hoover Institution Archives, Palo Alto, California
- Library of Congress Manuscript Division, Washington, D.C.
- George C. Marshall Research Library, Lexington, Virginia
- General Douglas MacArthur Memorial Library, Norfolk, Virginia
- National Archives of the United Kingdom, Kew, England

See also the companion collections: U.S. Intelligence on Europe, 1945-1995, U.S. Intelligence on Asia, 1945-1991, U.S. Intelligence on the Middle East, 1945-2009, and Weapons of Mass Destruction.
• Number of titles: 13 • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records available • Location of originals: National Library of Russia, St. Petersburg This collection comprises unique material on sports and physical culture in Russia, 1891-1919 and is particularly significant because sports provided opportunities for transitions from tradition to modernity: athletic competition broke down class barriers, brought women into public spaces, and encouraged new modes of behavior and self-presentation. Sports are essential to the evolution of the modern personality in terms of health, competitiveness and team play. The collection offers extraordinary sources for researchers into a variety of topics. Tourism, an important growth field in academic studies, relates directly to sports. Most significantly, contemporary interest in sexuality is informed by sports periodicals. Not only are gender roles transformed through sports, but the visuals in these publications illustrate emergent feminine and masculine ideals.
• Number of titles: Part 1: 13 Part 2: 20 Part 3: 24 • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records available Russian Cinematographic Press (1907- 1918) is a unique collection of Russian film periodicals published during the last decade of the Tsarist regime. The collection includes sophisticated, bimonthly periodicals as well as more popular weeklies released by the major Russian film studios. Containing, amongst other things, interviews with movie stars and screenplays that are now irretrievably lost, these journals will prove an invaluable source of information for anyone interested in the silent movie era and Russia’s entertainment industry at the eve of the Revolution.

History of Modern Russian and Ukrainian Art Online

Monographs and Serials, 1907-1930

The collection documents the history of modern Russian and Ukrainian art. It encompasses critical literature, illustrated books, and art periodicals. The collection contains texts by such artists as Wassily Kandinsky, Pavel Filonov, Kazimir Malevich and Anatolii Petrytskyi; publications of art groups such as the Jack of Diamonds (Bubnovyi valet) and Màkovets; theoretical tracts by Nikolai Tarabukin and Boris Kushner; and books by well-known critics such as Iakov Tugendkhol'd, Erikh Gollerbakh, and Nikolai Punin. The collection also offers a selection of early 20th century art-related serials. These historical sources of pre- and post-revolutionary art reflect the diversity of artistic thought in the first thirty years of the 20th century, the intense discussions about the nature of the new art, its form, and its aims. The publication contains 158 monographs and 57 serials.
• Number of titles: 5 • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records available • Location of originals: The National Library of Russia Nothing illuminates the lost world of late Imperial Russia better than the pictorial magazines of the era. The illustrated weeklies gathered in this collection open a wide window on Russian cultural, social, and political life. Their editors traced the sweep of the Russian imagination at the apogee of Russian cultural power from the peak years of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy to the modernist era and the chaos of 1917. They captured imperial expansion, cultural innovation, high fashion, graphic arts, performing arts, grand funerals and anniversaries, occasions of state, wonders of science, and domestic and foreign politics. In addition, the weeklies inscribed the changing image of Russia’s great cities, its landscapes, and its multinational citizenry, together with literary life and a visual and verbal chronicle of all and sundry occasions and events. Each issue of these magazines contains surprises for historians and scholars of culture alike.
• Number of titles: Fond 2307, opis’ 1-2 and Fond 2308, opis’ 1 - from the Russian State Archive of Literature and Art (RGALI), Moscow • Dates: (inclusive): 1916-1950 • Languages used: Russian, Yiddish, English, French, German, Hebrew, Ukrainian, Belarus, Georgian, Latvian • EAD finding aids are available • Location of originals: the Russian State Archive of Literature and Art (RGALI) in Moscow This collection of archival documents contains material that describes the history of Soviet culture and theater, Jewish avant-garde art and the Kremlin’s policy toward Jewish society and culture from 1919 until 1949. Among the artists associated with GOSET are Marc Chagall, Natan Al’tman, Isaac Rabinovich, Robert Falk, Aleksandr Tyshler, and others. The collection contains correspondence with ministries, state organizations, and authors; administrative-managerial documents; plays performed by or submitted to the theater (many of which have never been published); notes written by the censors; musical items for productions; press clippings about the theater; posters, programs and librettos; photographs of GOSET productions and of the actors off -stage; as well as personal documents of Alekseĭ Granovskiĭ, Solomon Mikhoėls, V.M. Zuskin and other members of the troupe.
• Number of titles: 11 titles (Part 1), Penny (Kopeck) Magazines (Part 2) • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records available • Location of originals: The National Library of Russia, St.-Petersburg This unique collection consists of complete runs of the kopeck (penny) newspapers, the most widely circulated newspapers in the beginning of the twentieth century, published under various titles in St. Petersburg and Petrograd (1908-1918) and also in Moscow (1909-1918). These (penny) newspapers document political and social developments in Russia in the pivotal years from 1908 to 1918 and at the same time provide a mirror of the colorful social and cultural life of the Russian capitals. They include writings on social questions, tabloid sensationalism and popular fiction. The success of the kopeck newspapers of St. Petersburg and Moscow before and during the First World War represents the culmination of a reading revolution that reshaped urban Russians’ understanding of every aspect of life, from gender relations and national identity to the role of literature and the arts in society. This collection of “Kopeika” press allows easy access to a unique and rare source practically unavailable in Western libraries.
Moscow News, founded in 1930, for years represented the official English-language press organ of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Its establishment stemmed from a large influx of foreign, mostly American, workers who emigrated to Russia during the Great Depression. Its mastermind was American journalist and activist Anna Louise Strong, who acted in cooperation with Stalin’s cultural propagandists with the aim of providing English-speaking newcomers with an informative – and often edulcorated – view of the Soviet standards of life. Thus, throughout the years, Moscow News served as a tool of positive propaganda that the Soviet regime employed to embellish and polish its public image. As a consequence, censorship heavily affected its rhetoric, narrative, and contents, determining which issues were worthy of being reported and which ones had to be dismissed or ignored. For this reason, the newspaper is a rich resource for those who are interested in assessing the internal mechanism of the Soviet Union’s cultural diplomacy and consensus-building machine.

In the late 1940s, the newspaper and its editors became the target of Stalin’s purges. With the exacerbation of the Cold War confrontation and the worsening of the nuclear arms race, the newspaper came to represent an unnecessary open window to the regime’s internal dynamics. The newspaper’s publication was therefore interrupted between 1949 and 1956. Nevertheless, Moscow News was resuscitated during Khrushchev’s thaw. The general editorial policy of the newspaper did not change, as it continued providing a rather orthodox interpretation of the Cold War and the role of the Soviet Union in world affairs. It also continued to focus on the achievements of Russian society, covering fields ranging from sports to technology. But its structure changed completely, as it became a modern media outlet translated in as many as a dozen different languages, including Russian, and distributed worldwide. It relied on professional interpreters, translators, and copyeditors, and its style, layout, and reporting matched those of Western presses.

Content-wise, Moscow News remained substantially aligned with the Politburo’s policy, thus blaming American policy and simultaneously ignoring or underestimating crucial events in the Eastern bloc, as in the case of the Prague Spring or the revolts in Budapest. This all changed, however, with the launch of the policies of glasnost and perestroika in the 1980s, when the paper progressively endorsed a transparency campaign aimed at uncovering some of the most disturbing elements of Stalin’s reign of terror. The institutional changes that affected Russia after the end of the Cold War represented both a challenge and an opportunity for the newspaper, which moved from being Stalin’s mouthpiece to promoting democracy and the free press in Russia. Mounting criticism by Moscow News toward the current political setting in Moscow led to its definitive closure in 2014.

Moscow News Archives have been digitized in cooperation with the International Institute of Social History.

• Number of titles: 11 • Languages used: Russian • Title list available • MARC records are available • Location of originals: various libraries This collection introduces the uniquely varied and poorly explored Russian Muslim population during one of the most dynamic periods of their history (1861-1918). Materials published in Russia both at the center and on the periphery reflect the picturesque palette of life of Muslims in the Russian Empire, as well as the positions of their public and political figures. This collection presents works written by and about Muslims. The value of this heritage is especially pertinent now that the historical and spiritual past of Muslims in Russia is being actively reconsidered.