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Amnesty's Country Dossiers (1975- ) and Publications (1962- ).

Collection of documents from Amnesty International's Research Archives, containing Amnesty's Country Dossiers and Publications since 1975 and 1962, respectively, updated on a yearly basis. The reports and dossiers contain a variety of information on each country, sifted from published studies, contemporary archives, and press reports in all media. Legislation pertaining to the administration of justice in each country is quoted from official publications. Also included are interviews with former prisoners and government representatives, as well as reports of on-the-spot investigations of prisons.

MARC21 collection record available

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Amnesty International
Amnesty's Country Dossiers (1975- ) and Publications (1962- )

In 1998, Pierre Sané, Secretary General of Amnesty International, described the character and significance of the microfiche edition as follows:
"1998 marks the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights – the bedrock of contemporary human rights – and is a significant year for Amnesty International and human rights organizations throughout the world. The anniversary is a time both to look at what we have achieved, and what challenges lie ahead for the human rights community.
In this half century, Amnesty International has helped to enshrine human rights in international law, raised public and political awareness of those basic rights and the abuses which still take place, and worked with the ever growing number of grassroots human rights groups throughout the world. In marking the anniversary of the Declaration, Amnesty International is focusing on highlighting the risks faced by human rights defenders -- the people on the front line of human rights protection -- and demonstrating the popular support for the Declaration through our worldwide signature campaign. We are looking towards further strengthening the human rights movement in the next 50 years, and to make sure that ignorance of abuses can never again be used as an excuse for inaction.
For this reason, finding out about human rights violations and making those facts public is crucial, and the role of IDC is extremely valuable in making this information available in microfiche editions with comprehensive, annually updated inventories on CD-ROM."


Access
The microfiche edition is annually updated, and made accessible on item level by an online EAD finding aid and a printed guide listing all individual documents in this unique collection. The printed guide is also updated on a yearly basis. The printed guide is cumulated every five years.

Country Dossiers
The information in Amnesty International Reports and Country Dossiers is compiled, analysed and edited by volunteers and members of the staff of Amnesty International. The information comes from diverse sources and is collected on the basis of disciplined research. Background information is sifted from published studies, contemporary archives, press reports, and transcriptions of radio broadcasts. Legislation pertaining to the administration of justice in each country is quoted from official publications. Exhaustive interviews with former prisoners are conducted by Amnesty International researchers. Details on individual cases are verified by consulting experts and other international organizations. Where possible, Amnesty International sends missions to countries to meet government representatives, visit prisons, and conduct on the spot investigations.

Publications
Once the information has been collected, the details are cross-checked by Amnesty International's Research Department and Legal Office to corroborate individual testimony and ensure the integrity of the final published reports for which Amnesty International takes full responsibility.
Faces of Eurasia
Caucasus

Together with its three counterparts ( Faces of Eurasia: General, Faces of Eurasia: Central Asia, and Faces of Eurasia: Siberia), this exciting collection of travel accounts, notes, diaries, and ethnographic descriptions dating from the seventeenth through the early twentieth century, features the vast region of "Eurasia" as seen through the eyes of Western travelers. It offers a unique opportunity to experience some of the awe and bewilderment that these explorers must have felt, while simultaneously inviting one to take a critical look at the cultural and national stereotypes on which they relied. The collection will appeal to historians, ethnographers, anthropologists, linguists, and all scholars interested in the clash between Western civilization, the world of Islam, and the many different cultures that existed in the Asian parts of the Russian empire.

This collection is also included in the Faces of Eurasia collection.
Faces of Eurasia
Central Asia

Together with its three counterparts ( Faces of Eurasia: General, Faces of Eurasia: Caucasus, and Faces of Eurasia: Siberia), this exciting collection of travel accounts, notes, diaries, and ethnographic descriptions dating from the seventeenth through the early twentieth century, features the vast region of "Eurasia" as seen through the eyes of Western travelers. It offers a unique opportunity to experience some of the awe and bewilderment that these explorers must have felt, while simultaneously inviting one to take a critical look at the cultural and national stereotypes on which they relied. The collection will appeal to historians, ethnographers, anthropologists, linguists, and all scholars interested in the clash between Western civilization, the world of Islam, and the many different cultures that existed in the Asian parts of the Russian empire.

This collection is also included in the Faces of Eurasia collection.
Faces of Eurasia
General

Together with its three counterparts ( Faces of Eurasia: Caucasus, Faces of Eurasia: Central Asia, and Faces of Eurasia: Siberia), this exciting collection of travel accounts, notes, diaries, and ethnographic descriptions dating from the seventeenth through the early twentieth century, features the vast region of "Eurasia" as seen through the eyes of Western travelers. It offers a unique opportunity to experience some of the awe and bewilderment that these explorers must have felt, while simultaneously inviting one to take a critical look at the cultural and national stereotypes on which they relied. The collection will appeal to historians, ethnographers, anthropologists, linguists, and all scholars interested in the clash between Western civilization, the world of Islam, and the many different cultures that existed in the Asian parts of the Russian empire.

This collection is also included in the Faces of Eurasia collection.
Faces of Eurasia
Siberia

Together with its three counterparts ( Faces of Eurasia: General, Faces of Eurasia: Caucasus, and Faces of Eurasia: Central Asia), this exciting collection of travel accounts, notes, diaries, and ethnographic descriptions dating from the seventeenth through the early twentieth century, features the vast region of "Eurasia" as seen through the eyes of Western travelers. It offers a unique opportunity to experience some of the awe and bewilderment that these explorers must have felt, while simultaneously inviting one to take a critical look at the cultural and national stereotypes on which they relied. The collection will appeal to historians, ethnographers, anthropologists, linguists, and all scholars interested in the clash between Western civilization, the world of Islam, and the many different cultures that existed in the Asian parts of the Russian empire.

This collection is also included in the Faces of Eurasia collection.
The Old Believers movement
Periodicals, 1905-1918
The series on the Old Believers provides a wide variety of materials that will help to shed new light on the fascinating history of this religious minority and its place in Russian history. The present installment includes the most prominent and widely read Old Believers’ periodicals published between 1905 and 1918. The collection includes, amongst others, journals of the Popovtsy ( Zlatostrui, Mirskaia zhizni), of the so-called Pomor´e Union ( Shchit very, Vestnik Vserossiĭ skogo soiuza khristian pomorskogo soglasiia), the Belokrinitskiĭ Hierarchy ( Tserkov’, Staroobriadcheskaia mysl’, Staroobriadets) and the Chapel Consent ( Ural´skiĭ staroobriadets). Published during one of the most dynamic and turbulent periods of Russian history, these periodicals allow us to appreciate the traditional, yet vibrant world of the Old Believers at the eve of the revolution.

This collection is also included in the Religious Dissent in Russia: Old Believers collection.
The Old Believers movement
Cyrillic-Script Books, 1906-1916
The printing of Old Believer books in kirillicheskiĭ shrift is a unique phenomenon in book history. The Old Believer movement carried on the traditions of Russian Orthodox Christianity into the middle of the 20th century. The Old Believer culture was outstanding in its rigorous acceptance of Cyrillic Church Slavonic texts, and in its guarded attitude toward the same texts printed in grazhdanskiĭ shrift, which were introduced by Peter I in 1708. The books printed in Cyrillic have therefore always been the main source of information concerning the history and spiritual faith of the Old Believers. The beginning of the 20th century witnessed an avalanche of printed Old Believer religious literature. This literature comprises a number of original monographs, titled books, and icon-painting originals, as well as reprinted anti-Old Believer pamphlets in krillicheskiĭ shrift bearing polemic comments written by Old Believer adepts.

This collection is also included in the Religious Dissent in Russia: Old Believers collection.
The Old Believers movement
Old Believer Secular Literature, 1906-1918
At the dawn of the 20th century, the Old Believers exhibited an amazing ability to adapt to the new social and economic conditions without abandoning their traditional culture or their religious beliefs. This period saw the birth and subsequent blossoming of the widely known business dynasties. One of the main driving forces behind the printing of books in grazhdanskiĭ shrift was the revival of the polemic disputes between the Old Believers and the official Church. At the beginning of the 20th century, the Old Believers printed their secular literature in grazhdanskiĭ shrift, in order to draw attention to their crucial need for a greater number of sympathizers from the outside.
The variety of this type of Old Believer literature is extensive, ranging from historical and ethnographic works, polemic and political essays, scholarly works on philosophy, economics, and statistics, to works on theology and law, the minutes of Old Believer assemblies, fiction, and even poetry.
The recourse by the Old Believers to grazhdanskiĭ shrift and their deliberate orientation toward the “outside” reader and secular themes, makes this literature both more accessible and richer in substance and variety of topics.

This collection is also included in the Religious Dissent in Russia: Old Believers collection.
Early Printed Cyrillic Books
Library of Moscow State University, Belorussian and Ukrainian Publications

National and cultural identity
This collection bears witness to the complex, yet fascinating process of book printing in Belorussia and Ukraine when these countries were still under Polish-Lithuanian rule. Deprived of political rights and freedom of worship, the Orthodox Byelorussians and Ukrainians struggled to preserve their national and cultural identity by printing religious, liturgical, and historical books in the Cyrillic script. Often, these publications had a polemical intent – attacking the Catholics, the Uniates, and the Protestants alike – or propagated an openly nationalist agenda. One of the most popular works included in this collection is the Sinopsis – the first printed book on the history of the Eastern Slavs that promoted the idea of uniting all Slavic peoples. Equally interesting in this respect is the politically charged Trebnik, which was published in 1646 at the instigation of Piotr Mogila, the Metropolitan of Kiev.

The Brotherhoods
The role of the Brotherhoods ( bratstva) was crucial to this process of national emancipation. The Brotherhoods were political organizations that sought to stimulate Belorussian and Ukrainian culture by, for example, establishing schools and printing houses. Alarmed by these initiatives and anxious to curb the activities of the Brotherhoods, the government of the Polish-Lithuanian Union, in tandem with the Catholic and the Uniate Church, banned all politically sensitive publications. However, this did not prevent educated and influential Belorussians and Ukrainians from taking part in printing Cyrillic books. Printing houses specializing in Belorussian or Ukrainian publications existed at some point in time in Kiev, L’vov, Chernigov, Vilnius, Mogilev, and many other places.

Kiev-Perch Laura
The largest and most productive printing house in Ukraine belonged to the famous Monastery of the Caves, in Kiev ( Kieov-pecherskaia lavra). It functioned from 1616 until the end of the 18th century, and is represented in the present collection by 47 titles. These include a 1619 edition of the Anfologion (translated by Iov Boretskii), Pamva Berynda’s Leksikon slavianorusskii (the first Slavic “encyclopedia”), and a number of Besedy (“Conversations” on religious topics) that are especially noteworthy for the exceptionally high quality of the typography. The second largest segment of the collection comprises 20 books printed by the Uspenskii Brotherhood of Lvov, which was one of the most important cultural centers in Ukraine during the 17th and 18th centuries. In Belorussia, the Brotherhoods of Vilna and Eve, as well as smaller printing houses in Mogilev and Kutein, specialized in the printing of Cyrillic books. Among the most valuable of the 23 Belorussian books included in this collection are Kirill Trankvillion Stavrovetskii’s Perlo mnogotsennoe (1699), Akafisty vsesedmichnye (1698) – which was printed by the Brotherhood of Mogilev – and a number of sumptuously illustrated liturgical works and prayerbooks.

Unique collection
The present collection consists of 109 rare or otherwise valuable Belorussian and Ukrainian books printed in the 17th century. As well as having an historical value, the combination of luxurious design and sophisticated typography makes these works stand out as true landmarks of early book printing. The books were often embellished by professional artists, who added illustrations and designed the title pages. Ukrainian and Belorussian books differed from those printed in Moscow in both style and content. Whereas the latter were funded by the government and meticulously censored by the Metropolitan and the Tsar, the printing in the Ukraine and Belorussia was supported primarily by private donations. Their repertoire was also much more diversified. The books’ more colorful design, their covers, dedications, coats of arms, and spectacular illustrations contribute to the uniqueness of this material.

Moscow State University Library
Moscow State University Library (founded 1756) is one of the biggest libraries in Russia. Today, it stores more than 8 million volumes and owns many rare books and manuscripts. The most valuable part of its holdings is in the Rare Books and Manuscripts section, which accommodates over 200,000 items, including unique Western, Oriental, and Slavonic manuscripts, archives, incunabula, prints, and other early works. The unique collection of early printed Slavonic books was obtained largely through donations, purchases, transfers from other libraries, and the work of the Archeographical Expedition (which spent over 30 years working among Russian Old Believers in different parts of the former Soviet Union). Nowadays, the Slavonic collection comprises 2,170 items dating from the 1400s to the 1900s.