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Various Authors & Editors

This part of the archives of the Gujarat Diocese of the Church of North India contains minutes of meetings, correspondence and other documents of the Irish Presbyterian Mission Council in Gujarat and relevant local committees.

Various Authors & Editors

Part of the archives of the Gujarat Diocese of the Church of North India is a selection of early printed monographs. This section contains the monographs that were printed by mission presses but not in Surat and consists of 58 volumes. A separate title list and MARC21 records are also available.

Various Authors & Editors

Part of the archives of the Gujarat Diocese of the Church of North India is a selection of early printed monographs. This section contains the monographs that were printed by the Irish Presbyterian Mission Press in Surat and consists of 105 volumes. A separate title list and MARC21 records are also available.

Various Authors & Editors

This part of the archives of the Gujarat Diocese of the Church of North India contains the annual reports prepared by the Irish Presbyterian Mission Council and describing the achievements of the past year. The reports also provide information about the financial situation of the IP Mission. The covered years range from 1851 till 1965.
Annual reports of the Missions’ Orphanage have been added as a separate section. These reports range from 1870 till 1958.

Various Authors & Editors

The Archives of the Church of Uganda
Office of the Bishop of Uganda

The records document the history of the Church of the Province of Uganda. Christianity came to Uganda late compared with many other parts of Africa. The first Church Missionary Society missionaries arrived at King Mutesa's court on June 30, 1877. This was seventy-eight years after the founding of the Church Missionary Society in Great Britain. However, within eight decades, after having passed through much persecution, Uganda had become one of the most successful mission fields in the world. By 1914, through its indigenous teachers and a few European missionaries, nearly the whole of the area today called Uganda had already been evangelized. In 1961 the growth of the Church of Uganda was recognized in the Anglican Communion with the establishment of the Church of the Province of Uganda, Rwanda-Burundi and Boga-Zaire.

This collection is an important source not only for the history of Christianity in Uganda, but also for the political and social development of the country, both before and after its independence.

This collection is also included in the Archives of the Church of Uganda collection.

Various Authors & Editors

The Archives of the Church of Uganda
Education Secretary General

The records document the history of the Church of the Province of Uganda. Christianity came to Uganda late compared with many other parts of Africa. The first Church Missionary Society missionaries arrived at King Mutesa's court on June 30, 1877. This was seventy-eight years after the founding of the Church Missionary Society in Great Britain. However, within eight decades, after having passed through much persecution, Uganda had become one of the most successful mission fields in the world. By 1914, through its indigenous teachers and a few European missionaries, nearly the whole of the area today called Uganda had already been evangelized. In 1961 the growth of the Church of Uganda was recognized in the Anglican Communion with the establishment of the Church of the Province of Uganda, Rwanda-Burundi and Boga-Zaire.

This collection is an important source not only for the history of Christianity in Uganda, but also for the political and social development of the country, both before and after its independence.

This collection is also included in the Archives of the Church of Uganda collection.

Various Authors & Editors

The Archives of the Church of Uganda
Financial Secretary

The records document the history of the Church of the Province of Uganda. Christianity came to Uganda late compared with many other parts of Africa. The first Church Missionary Society missionaries arrived at King Mutesa's court on June 30, 1877. This was seventy-eight years after the founding of the Church Missionary Society in Great Britain. However, within eight decades, after having passed through much persecution, Uganda had become one of the most successful mission fields in the world. By 1914, through its indigenous teachers and a few European missionaries, nearly the whole of the area today called Uganda had already been evangelized. In 1961 the growth of the Church of Uganda was recognized in the Anglican Communion with the establishment of the Church of the Province of Uganda, Rwanda-Burundi and Boga-Zaire.

This collection is an important source not only for the history of Christianity in Uganda, but also for the political and social development of the country, both before and after its independence.

This collection is also included in the Archives of the Church of Uganda collection.

Various Authors & Editors

The Archives of the Church of Uganda
Archbishop's Office

The records document the history of the Church of the Province of Uganda. Christianity came to Uganda late compared with many other parts of Africa. The first Church Missionary Society missionaries arrived at King Mutesa's court on June 30, 1877. This was seventy-eight years after the founding of the Church Missionary Society in Great Britain. However, within eight decades, after having passed through much persecution, Uganda had become one of the most successful mission fields in the world. By 1914, through its indigenous teachers and a few European missionaries, nearly the whole of the area today called Uganda had already been evangelized. In 1961 the growth of the Church of Uganda was recognized in the Anglican Communion with the establishment of the Church of the Province of Uganda, Rwanda-Burundi and Boga-Zaire.

This collection is an important source not only for the history of Christianity in Uganda, but also for the political and social development of the country, both before and after its independence.

This collection is also included in the Archives of the Church of Uganda collection.
The Old Believers movement
Periodicals, 1905-1918
The series on the Old Believers provides a wide variety of materials that will help to shed new light on the fascinating history of this religious minority and its place in Russian history. The present installment includes the most prominent and widely read Old Believers’ periodicals published between 1905 and 1918. The collection includes, amongst others, journals of the Popovtsy ( Zlatostrui, Mirskaia zhizni), of the so-called Pomor´e Union ( Shchit very, Vestnik Vserossiĭ skogo soiuza khristian pomorskogo soglasiia), the Belokrinitskiĭ Hierarchy ( Tserkov’, Staroobriadcheskaia mysl’, Staroobriadets) and the Chapel Consent ( Ural´skiĭ staroobriadets). Published during one of the most dynamic and turbulent periods of Russian history, these periodicals allow us to appreciate the traditional, yet vibrant world of the Old Believers at the eve of the revolution.

This collection is also included in the Religious Dissent in Russia: Old Believers collection.
The Old Believers movement
Cyrillic-Script Books, 1906-1916
The printing of Old Believer books in kirillicheskiĭ shrift is a unique phenomenon in book history. The Old Believer movement carried on the traditions of Russian Orthodox Christianity into the middle of the 20th century. The Old Believer culture was outstanding in its rigorous acceptance of Cyrillic Church Slavonic texts, and in its guarded attitude toward the same texts printed in grazhdanskiĭ shrift, which were introduced by Peter I in 1708. The books printed in Cyrillic have therefore always been the main source of information concerning the history and spiritual faith of the Old Believers. The beginning of the 20th century witnessed an avalanche of printed Old Believer religious literature. This literature comprises a number of original monographs, titled books, and icon-painting originals, as well as reprinted anti-Old Believer pamphlets in krillicheskiĭ shrift bearing polemic comments written by Old Believer adepts.

This collection is also included in the Religious Dissent in Russia: Old Believers collection.