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Series:

Christian Henriot, Lu SHI and Charlotte Aubrun

The present volume is the first systematic reconstruction of the demographic series of the population of Shanghai from the mid-nineteenth century to 1953. Designed as a reference and source book, it is based on a thorough exploration of all population data and surveys available in published documents and in archival sources. The book focuses mostly on the pre-1949 period and extends to the post-1949 period only in relation to specific topics. Shanghai is probably the only city in China where such a reconstruction is possible over such a long period due to the wealth of sources and its particular administrative history, especially the existence of two foreign settlements.

Series:

Edited by Loek Halman, Inge Sieben and Marga van Zundert

Who are the Europeans? How do they think about life after death, work, sex, euthanasia, immigration or freedom? What traditions do they cherish, and which modern values gain ground? This second Atlas of European Values summarizes the beliefs of Europeans in almost two hundred informative graphs, charts and maps.

This Atlas is the result of the European Values Study, a research project that has measured values and beliefs throughout Europe since the 1980s. Today, the study spans a full generation, revealing value changes on topics such as homosexuality and working moms, but also demonstrating firm European traditions in democracy and rejection of bribes.

The unique Atlas of European Values covers all European nations from Iceland to Turkey, and from Portugal to Russia. It graphically illustrates the rich diversity of values and beliefs of the more than 800 million Europeans living inside and outside the European Union today.

Loek Halman, Ruud Luijkx and Marga van Zundert


Who are the Europeans? How do they think? What values do they hold dear? What binds them and what divides them? This atlas summarizes the outcomes of the European Values Study, combined with results from the World Values Survey, two projects that have measured values over the past three decades. The European Values Study project is run by researchers from 33 countries and is administered by Tilburg University, the Netherlands.
The Atlas presents European ideas and beliefs in the form of graphs, charts and maps. Values such as democracy, freedom, equality, human dignity and solidarity are held by almost all Europeans, but the survey points to differing views about marriage, religion, work and such topics as euthanasia, happiness, sexuality and death.
This unique Atlas covers all European nations from Iceland to Turkey, from Portugal to the Ukraine. It graphically illustrates the rich diversity that is Europe.