Series:

Kelly DeVries

There is perhaps no other more lively area for study in medieval history than medieval military history, with its attendant and complementary field, the history of medieval military technology. In the past twenty years, it seems that more major scholarly inroads have been made in this field than in any other historical genre of medieval studies or chronological period of military history. What this has meant is that it is now more difficult to keep up with all of the trends and sources in the field than ever before. Hence the need for a reference work which covers what has previously been written and which, in turn, can assist the scholar, both the more experienced academic and the beginner, to improve his or her work in medieval military history or the history of medieval military technology.
Utilizing library catalogues, bibliographies, and footnotes, this bibliography has compiled the most complete list of secondary references to works in medieval military history and the history of military technology. It keeps fairly strictly to a geography which centers on conventional medieval boundaries-Europe, Byzantium, and the Middle East. However, the chronology does differ from the conventional medieval dates. Because of its influence on the early Middle Ages, references to Late Antiquity, especially to the military history and technology of the third- and fourth-century Roman Empire have been included. For the opposite reason, the influence of the Middle Ages on the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, references to military history and technology up to 1648 have been included as well. This is especially important in the study of the Ottoman Turkish Wars and Arms and Armor, where the end of the fifteenth century as a chronological terminus makes little sense.

Also available on cd-rom.

Edited by Ying Liu, Zhongping Chen and Gregory Blue

Zheng He’s Maritime Voyages (1405-1433) and China’s Relations with the Indian Ocean World: A Multilingual Bibliography provides a multidisciplinary guide to publications on this great navigator’s activities and their impact on Chinese and world history. Admiral Zheng He commanded the fifteenth-century world’s largest fleet. In the course of seven voyages made between 1405 and 1433, his massive ships visited over thirty present-day countries in Asia and Africa. Those voyages reflected and reinforced the development of complex networks of trade, migration, cultural exchange, and political interactions between China and the Indian Ocean world.
This bibliography lists sources in thirteen languages, including both scholarly studies and popular works like Gavin Menzies’s controversial bestsellers claiming the Chinese sailed around the world before Columbus. Relevant translations, transliterations and annotations are provided to aid the reader.

Series:

Kelly DeVries

This is the first update of A Cumulative Bibliography of Medieval Military History and Technology, which appeared in 2002. It is meant to do two things: to present references to works on medieval military history and technology not included in the first volume; and to present references to all books and articles published on medieval military history and technology from 2000 to 2002. These references are divided into the same categories as in the first volume and cover a chronological period of the same length, from late antiquity to 1648, again in order to present a more complete picture of influences on and from the Middle Ages. It also continues to cover the same geographical area as the first volume, in essence Europe and the Middle East, or, again, influences on and from this area. The languages of these bibliographical references reflect this geography.

The Visigoths in Gaul and Iberia

A Supplemental Bibliography, 1984-2003

Series:

Alberto Ferreiro

The bibliography includes material published from 1984 to 2003. The historical chronology has been expanded to include the fourth century. This includes unlike the first one Iberian Fathers such as Gregory of Elvira, Potamius of Lisboa, Prudentius, and Pacian of Barcelona. As with the first bibliography (Brill, 1988) among the many topics represented are: Archaeology, Liturgy, Monasticism, Iberian-Gallic Patristics, Paleography, Linguistics, Germanic and Muslim Invasions, and more. In addition, peoples such as the Vandals, Sueves, Basques, Alans and Byzantines are included. The book contains author and subject indexes and is extensively cross-indexed for easy consultation. A periodicals index of hundreds of journals accompanies the volume. This collection of nearly 8,000 entries is an attempt to bring up-to-date the scholarship on Iberia and Gaul in Late Antiquity.

World Military History Annotated Bibliography

Premodern and Nonwestern Military Institutions (Works Published before 1967)

Series:

Barton Hacker

Military institutions and methods of warfare in the non-Western world from antiquity through the early 20th century provide the chief subjects of this annotated bibliography of works published before 1967. Especially rich in references to periodical literature, it emphasizes military organization and relationships between military and other social institutions, rather than wars and battles. The bibliography comprises seven parts: (1) general and comparative topics, including works on the social, cultural, and biological causes of war; (2) the ancient world; (3) western Eurasia since antiquity; (4) eastern Eurasia since antiquity; (5) sub-Saharan Africa and Oceania; (6) pre-Columbian America; and (7) Indians in post-contact America.

World Military History Bibliography

Premodern and Nonwestern Military Institutions and Warfare

Series:

Barton Hacker

Preclassical and indigenous nonwestern military institutions and methods of warfare are the chief subjects of this annotated bibliography of work published 1967–1997. Classical antiquity, post-Roman Europe, and the westernized armed forces of the 20th century, although covered, receive less systematic attention. Emphasis is on historical studies of military organization and the relationships between military and other social institutions, rather than wars and battles. Especially rich in references to the periodical literature, the bibliography is divided into eight parts: (1) general and comparative topics; (2) the ancient world; (3) Eurasia since antiquity; (4) sub-Saharan Africa and Oceania; (5) pre-Columbian America; (6) postcontact America; (7) the contemporary nonwestern world; and (8) philosophical, social scientific, natural scientific, and other works not primarily historical.