Author: Kelly DeVries
There is perhaps no other more lively area for study in medieval history than medieval military history, with its attendant and complementary field, the history of medieval military technology. In the past twenty years, it seems that more major scholarly inroads have been made in this field than in any other historical genre of medieval studies or chronological period of military history. What this has meant is that it is now more difficult to keep up with all of the trends and sources in the field than ever before. Hence the need for a reference work which covers what has previously been written and which, in turn, can assist the scholar, both the more experienced academic and the beginner, to improve his or her work in medieval military history or the history of medieval military technology.
Utilizing library catalogues, bibliographies, and footnotes, this bibliography has compiled the most complete list of secondary references to works in medieval military history and the history of military technology. It keeps fairly strictly to a geography which centers on conventional medieval boundaries-Europe, Byzantium, and the Middle East. However, the chronology does differ from the conventional medieval dates. Because of its influence on the early Middle Ages, references to Late Antiquity, especially to the military history and technology of the third- and fourth-century Roman Empire have been included. For the opposite reason, the influence of the Middle Ages on the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, references to military history and technology up to 1648 have been included as well. This is especially important in the study of the Ottoman Turkish Wars and Arms and Armor, where the end of the fifteenth century as a chronological terminus makes little sense.

Author: Owen Gingerich
The Annotated Census lists and describes - on the basis of direct examination - all of the 560 located copies of the first and second editions of Copernicus' De revolutionibus orbium coelestium that survive in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia, as well as several copies of known provenance destroyed, stolen or otherwise lost in modern times. The entry for each copy lists its present location and describes particulars of its binding, size, and any shelf marks. A short history is given of the provenance of each copy, wherever possible with identification of owners and dates of ownership. Marginalia and interlinear notes are also indicated together with transcription and translation of the more important ones. The content of the more significant notes is discussed (with reference to the modern literature), analyses that sometimes develop into substantial essays. Numerous plates show examples of the handwriting of the major annotators. Appendices list the other works bound with De revolutionibus, and prices at auction going back to the 18th century.
The density and quality of the data provided about the copies make this a fascinating reference work not only for scholars interested in the history of astronomy but especially for all those interested in printing in the early modern period. The census will also provide an almost inexhaustible mine of information concerning the spread of ideas, scholarly networks, book collecting, and library development from the 17th to 20th centuries.
Zheng He’s Maritime Voyages (1405-1433) and China’s Relations with the Indian Ocean World: A Multilingual Bibliography provides a multidisciplinary guide to publications on this great navigator’s activities and their impact on Chinese and world history. Admiral Zheng He commanded the fifteenth-century world’s largest fleet. In the course of seven voyages made between 1405 and 1433, his massive ships visited over thirty present-day countries in Asia and Africa. Those voyages reflected and reinforced the development of complex networks of trade, migration, cultural exchange, and political interactions between China and the Indian Ocean world.
This bibliography lists sources in thirteen languages, including both scholarly studies and popular works like Gavin Menzies’s controversial bestsellers claiming the Chinese sailed around the world before Columbus. Relevant translations, transliterations and annotations are provided to aid the reader.

Editor: van Herwijnen
Editor: Kahan
Until now, the Communist movement has been studied more from the national perspective than the international. This scholarly tradition seems to be at odds with the organisatorial interconnection even subjugation of the national communist parties ("sections") to the Communist International, or Comintern (1919/1943), but it is understandable from the point of view of the historian who has only national sources at his disposal (newspapers, brochures, interviews).
Nowadays, the tendency is for the international component of the Communist movement to participate in research. The archives of the Comintern are gradually being released by the Soviet Union, and an enormous number of official publications is emerging, and being made available in libraries by reprints.
Here, Vilém Kahan's bibliography is an indispensable tool in listing nearly all reference works and publications by and on the Comintern, and in giving a list of aliases of speakers on Comintern meetings and an overview of all agendas of the meetings. These lists are based on research in 14 specialised Western libraries and on the knowledge of a dozen European languages.
The second volume will deal with the front organisations, a third and last volume with the national sections.
Scope
The Bibliography of the History and Archaeology of Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages is a fundamental source of information for the study of the history and archaeology of medieval East Central and Eastern Europe, an area of great interference and symbiosis of influences from Scandinavia, Western Europe, the steppe lands of Eurasia, as well as Byzantium. The bibliography provides comprehensive coverage of all publications, in all languages, pertaining to this vast area of the European continent and its impact on European history from about 500 to the aftermath of the Mongol invasion of 1241. The bibliography aims to encourage further research, but also to provide guidance through an enormous amount of information available in a variety of languages and a great multitude of publications. It offers search capabilities which are particularly useful for very narrowly defined research goals, thus encouraging comparative work with materials from other parts of Europe.

Key features
• Contains over 75,000 bibliographical records
• Updated annually, with approximately 1,000 to 2,000 new records added
• All titles in languages other than English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish are translated into English
• Full browsing possibilities: the bibliography is browsable via filters, inlcuing publication date, format, language, and subject keywords
• Fully searchable: full text search, keyword search, author search, title search
• Over 5,000 keywords, covering geographical, chronological, and thematic categories, allowing both general and specific searches; unclear keywords are clarified by illustrations

Subjects included in the Bibliography of the History and Archaeology of Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages:
• history and art history
• archaeology, bioarchaeology, and zooarchaeology
• linguistics and philology
• paleography, epigraphy, and manuscript studies
• numismatics and sigillography
• climate history and paleobotany

Publication forms included in the Bibliography of the History and Archaeology of Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages:
• books (monographs)
• articles from journals, including e-journals
• chapters from edited volumes, including Festschriften and conference proceedings
• reviews and review articles
• bibliographies
• PhD dissertations and MA theses
• critical editions and translations of primary sources

Endorsements
"This Bibliography opens the door to a wealth of titles of articles and books dealing with the written and archaeological data for western Eurasian history from the Baltic, the Middle Danube and the Adriatic to Byzantium, the Urals and beyond. As one might expect from the editor’s track-record, a very wide range of materials has undergone judicious selection and characterization, particularly with reference to archaeological publications, for the period from c. 500 until the new order which the Mongols brought to much of Western Eurasia in the mid-thirteenth century. Keywords guide the novice further into the subject, step by step, while the specialist can zero in on the topic, technical term or author of their choice. Matters of literary, cultural or general history receive their due, and one can pursue such topics as Law and Liturgy in a Dalmatian city, the Rus Metropolitan Ilarion’s Sermon on Law and Grace, or the ritual goings-on at the Polish town of Gniezno in 1000 with equal ease. Given the fragmented and multilingual nature of the subject matter and the countless problems of interpretation raised by our all too scanty narrative sources, the navigation-aids provided in this Bibliography will be invaluable for students and scholars alike. The directions are given clearly enough to make sense even to a digital non-native (such as myself)."
Jonathan Shepard, University of Oxford.

"The Bibliography of the History and Archaeology of Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages is an essential tool for scholars interested in the history of the region. It offers a comprehensive list of more than 65,000 bibliographic entries in major western languages. In addition it brings also the vast production of historians and archaeologists published in local languages, usually unnoticed by western scholars. The bibliography is a modern, first-hand heuristic tool for anyone interested in medieval history and archaeology of East and East Central Europe. It is user friendly and provides thousands of entries fully classified by date and key words, including full bibliographical record."
Dusan Zupka, Comenius University, Bratislava.
Book History Online (BHO) is the international bibliography in the field of book and library history. It provides a comprehensive survey of all scholarly publications written from a historical perspective. Included are monographs, articles and reviews dealing with the history of the printed book, its arts, crafts, techniques and equipment, its economic, social and cultural environment, as well as its production, distribution, preservation and description. In particular, BHO contains information on topics such as papermaking, bookbinding, book illustration, type design, typefounding, bibliophily, book collecting, libraries and individuals.

Features
- Access to nearly 120,000 records
- Logging scholarly publications from the late 19th century until today
- Entries ordered by subject, country or period
- Covering over 40 languages (predominantly German, English, French and Dutch)
- Search by title, author, keyword, language and more
- Personal tools include save searches, search alerts and exporting tools
- Updated regularly

BHO is the online continuation of the Annual Bibliography of the History of the Printed Book and Libraries (ABHB), initially edited by Hendrik D.L. Vervliet and subsequently by the Department of Special Collections of the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (The Hague). The first volume was published in 1970.
Author: Sibylle Ihm
This volume is a database of information about and references to literature on commentaries on Greek and Latin medical writers. It includes Greek and Latin commentaries up to the 12th century on authors, who were active before 600 A.D. It takes account of commentaries on Galen in particular and of later Alexandrian physicians - surviving and lost - as well as of commentaries originally composed in Greek which were only transmitted in Arabic translation. This catalogue summarises current knowledge of these commentaries covering manuscripts, editions, type of commentary, and the state of research. Particulars of primary sources and detailed literature references enable users to fine-tune their searches in this corpus of material.
This volume is a compendium of all known commentaries on Hebrew liturgical poetry (piyyut) preserved in manuscript form. It includes references to commentaries from many different Jewish communities, most prominent among them Ashkenaz, Tsarfat, Sepharad, Carpentras and Yemen, composed and copied in Medieval and Early Modern times. Over 18,000 individual commentaries on more than 2,000 poems are listed with primary sources and references to editions where extant. As an aid to research, it describes a vast but hitherto neglected genre of medieval Hebrew literature and maps out a whole new field of investigation into medieval Jewish textual culture. This catalogue enables users to find manuscript commentaries on most piyyutim that were included in liturgies in major Jewish communities.
Author: Kelly DeVries
The Cumulative Bibliography of Medieval Military History and Technology was first published in print in 2001. This bibliography offers the most complete list of secondary references to works in medieval military history and the history of military technology. It covers a geography which centers on conventional medieval boundaries - Europe, Byzantium, and the Middle-East - with a chronology that stretches from the Late Antiquity to 1648.

This 2001 edition is now available on CD-ROM (using a Verity browser search engine) and will be updated annually (800 new entries anticipated a year) from 2003. Subscribers will receive updates automatically.

***For a Free Tour click here***
- Recognised as an essential source of reference to books and articles published in European languages in the field;
- Nearly 13,000 records
- Covers worldwide literature from 1896 to 2000.
- Powerful search options provide fast, accurate results.
- Windows interface and a variety of indices offer flexible access to both experienced and novice researchers.
- Indices include: Author, Title, Publication date, Place of publication, Publisher, Subject, Period, Geographical Area, Free text.

Also available in print-version (ISBN 90 04 12227 3)