Author: Gerrit Bos
The terminology in medieval Hebrew medical literature (original works and translations) has been sorely neglected by modern research. Medical terminology is virtually missing from the standard dictionaries of the Hebrew language, including Ha-Millon he-ḥadash, composed by Abraham Even-Shoshan. Ben-Yehuda’s dictionary is the only one that contains a significant number of medical terms. Unfortunately, Ben-Yehuda’s use of the medieval medical texts listed in the dictionary’s introduction is inconsistent at best. The only dictionary exclusively devoted to medical terms, both medieval and modern, is that by A.M. Masie, entitled Dictionary of Medicine and Allied Sciences. However, like the dictionary by Ben-Yehuda, it only makes occasional use of the sources registered in the introduction and only rarely differentiates between the various medieval translators. Further, since Masie’s work is alphabetized according to the Latin or English term, it cannot be consulted for Hebrew terms. The Historical Dictionary of the Hebrew Language, which is currently being created by the Academy of the Hebrew Language, has not been taken into account consistently as it is not a dictionary in the proper sense of the word. Moreover, consultation of this resource suggests that it is generally deficient in medieval medical terminology. The Bar Ilan Responsa Project has also been excluded as a source, despite the fact that it contains a larger number of medieval medical terms than the Historical Dictionary. The present dictionary has two major objectives: 1) to map the medical terminology featured in medieval Hebrew medical works, in order to facilitate study of medical terms, especially those terms that do not appear in the existing dictionaries, and terms that are inadequately represented. 2) to identify the medical terminology used by specific authors and translators, to enable the identification of anonymous medical material.
Author: Gerrit Bos
This volume is part of a wider project aiming at mapping the technical medical terminology as it features in medieval Hebrew medical works, especially those terms that do not feature in the current dictionaries at all, or insufficiently. In this way the author hopes to facilitate the consultation of these and other medical works and the identification of anonymous medical material. The terminology discussed in this volume has been derived from three primary and seven secondary sources. The primary sources are: (1) Sefer Ṣedat ha-Derakhim – Moses Ibn Tibbon’s translation of Ibn al-Jazzār’s Zād al-musāfir, bks. 1–2; (2) Sefer ha-Shimmush – Shem Tov Ben Isaac’s Hebrew translation of al-Zahrāwī’s Kitāb al-taṣrīf; (3) Sefer ha-Qanun – Nathan ha-Meʾati’s Hebrew translation of the first book of Ibn Sīnā’s K. al-Qānūn.
Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations from Greek into Arabic. Fascicle 14, ب to بين
From the eighth to the tenth century A.D., Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first systematic attempt to present in an analytical, rationalized way our knowledge of the vocabulary of these translations.
The Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament has proven to be a valuable resource for scholars and students. In this online edition the complete vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible, including texts in Aramaic, is available. The dictionary combines scholarly thoroughness with easy accessibility, and so meets the needs of a wide range of users.

The enormous advances that have taken place in the field of Semitic linguistics since the days of the older dictionaries of Classical Hebrew are well documented and assessed, as well as the often detailed discussions in modern Bible commentaries of words where the meaning is particularly difficult. The alphabetical ordering of entries rather than the traditional arrangement of words according to their roots is particularly helpful to the new student, and also saves the advanced user much time.
English text below

Sonderpreis
Kunden, die die gedruckte Version des LGB2 bezogen haben, zahlen 1.866 Euro statt 3.732.

Die Zielsetzung des «Lexikons des gesamten Buchwesens» ist es, das gesamte Wissen vom Buch, verstanden als die graphische Materialisierung geistiger Inhalte mit dem Ziel ihrer Erhaltung, Überlieferung und Verbreitung in der Gesellschaft, in wissenschaftlich zuverlässiger und exakter Weise in einer alphabetisch-lexikalischen Ordnung darzubieten.

Erfasst werden alle Personen, Institutionen, Fakten, Faktoren und Verfahren, die bei der Vermittlung geistiger Inhalte zwischen Autor und Leser durch das Medium Buch eine Rolle spielen. Der inhaltliche Rahmen des Lexikons umfasst die Bereiche der Produktion, Distribution und Rezeption des Buches. Berücksichtigt werden ebenfalls Teilbereiche jener Disziplinen, die insbesondere für die mit dem Buch beruflich Verbundenen, das heißt Bibliographen, Bibliothekare, Buchhändler und Verleger, aber auch für Bibliophile und Büchersammler von Bedeutung sein könnten. Hierzu gehören beispielsweise Elemente der Archivistik, Diplomatik, Kartographie, Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaft, des Zeitschriften und Pressewesens, sowie der Dokumentation und Information, der Datenverarbeitung und Medienkunde. Hierbei sind geographische Gesichtspunkte keine Selektionskriterien, jedoch liegen die Akzente auf dem europäischen, insbesondere dem deutschsprachigen Bereich.

Die einzelnen Artikel werden durch weiterführende Literaturangaben bereichert und durch Abbildungen, Tabellen und Karten ergänzt.

Die elektronische Fassung des Lexikons enthält rund 21.000 Eintragungen, verfasst von ca. 400 Autoren. Sie basiert auf der zweiten, völlig neu bearbeiteten Auflage des LGB (9 Bde; Stuttgart: Anton Hiersemann, 1987-2016).


English text

Special discount
Customers who have bought the print edition of LGB2 from Hiersemann Verlag pay 1.866 euro instead of 3.732 euro.

The aim of the Lexikons des gesamten Buchwesens (“Dictionary of the Book”) is to render the complete knowledge about the book in an academically reliable and exact manner, in alphabetical order. The book is understood as the graphical presentation of intellectual content with the aim of the preservation, transmission and dissemination of this content in society. All persons, institutions, facts, factors and procedures that play a role in the mediation of intellectual content between the author and the reader through the medium of the book are recorded. The dictionary covers everything from the production and distribution to the reception of the book. It also takes into account certain areas that are of particular importance to those working with books professionally, such as bibliographers, librarians, booksellers and publishers, but also for book collectors and bibliophiles. These include, for example, elements of archival studies, diplomacy, cartography, literature and linguistics, the press, epistemology, data processing and media studies. Geographical limitations do not play a role, yet the emphasis is on European, especially the German-speaking countries.

Each individual entry includes ends with a list of further reading and often includes illustrations, tables or maps.

The electronic edition contains about 21,000 entries, written by ca. 400 authors. It is based on the second, completely revised edition of the LGB (9 vols., Stuttgart: Anton Hiersemann, 1987-2016).
Author: Paul W. Kroll
Winner of the 2015 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award
Also available in paperback. The work is also included in the Chinese-English Dictionary Online.

A Student’s Dictionary of Classical and Medieval Chinese is the long-desired Chinese – English reference work for all those reading texts dating from the Warring States period through the Tang dynasty. Comprising 8,000+ characters, arranged alphabetically by Pinyin.
As a lexicon meant for practical use, it immensely facilitates reading and translating historical, literary, and religious texts dating from approximately 500 BCE to 1000 CE. Being primarily a dictionary of individual characters ( zidian 字典) and the words they represent, it also includes an abundance of alliterative and echoic binomes ( lianmianci 連綿詞) as well as accurate identifications of hundreds of plants, animals, and assorted technical terms in various fields. It aims to become the English-language resource of choice for all those seeking assistance in reading texts dating from the Warring States period through the Tang dynasty.
Previous Chinese-English dictionaries have persistently mixed together without clarification all eras and styles of Chinese. But written Chinese in its 3,000 year history has changed and evolved even more than English has in its mere millennium, with classical and medieval Chinese differing more from modern standard Chinese than the language of Beowulf or even that of Chaucer differs from modern English. This dictionary takes the user straight into the language of early and medieval texts, without the confusion of including meanings that developed only after 1000 CE. An added feature of the dictionary is its identification of meanings that were not developed and attached to individual graphs until the medieval period (approximately 250-1000 CE), setting these off where possible from earlier usages of the same graphs.
Those who have, or are acquiring, a basic understanding of classical grammar, whether approaching the language from a background either in modern Chinese or Japanese, will find it eases their labors appreciably and helps to solve countless problems of interpretation. Advanced students will find it to be the one reference work they want always close at hand.
The dictionary has an index by “radical” and stroke-number, and contains various appendices, including one with reign-eras and exact accession dates of emperors given according to both Chinese and Western calendars.

Corrections have been provided by William Baxter for some of the Middle Chinese (MC) readings in this revised edition of the dictionary. These are also reflected in the online version of the dictionary, available through chinesereferenceshelf.brillonline.com/chinese-english. They are also available in a downloadable file on this page under More Information for those who have purchased the first edition of this work.
Authors: Maria Bulakh and Leonid Kogan
The Arabic-Ethiopic Glossary by al-Malik al-Afḍal by Maria Bulakh and Leonid Kogan is a detailed annotated edition of a unique monument of Late Medieval Arabic lexicography, comprising 475 Arabic lexemes (some of them post-classical Yemeni dialectisms) translated into several Ethiopian idioms and put down in Arabic letters in a late-fourteenth century manuscript from a codex in a private Yemeni collection. For the many languages involved, the Glossary provides the earliest written records, by several centuries pre-dating the most ancient attestations known so far. The edition, preceded by a comprehensive linguistic introduction, gives a full account of the comparative material from all known Ethiopian Semitic languages. A detailed index ensures the reader’s orientation in the lexical treasures revealed from the Glossary.
Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations from Greek into Arabic. Fascicle 13, بيت TO بين
From the eighth to the tenth century A.D., Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first systematic attempt to present in an analytical, rationalized way our knowledge of the vocabulary of these translations.
Winner of the 2016 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award

The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is also available as a single volume and online. This luxury edition offers the same high-quality content as the regular edition but is bound in two slimmer volumes with linen stamped covers and comes in a linen-clad box.

The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is the English translation of Franco Montanari’s Vocabolario della Lingua Greca. With an established reputation as the most important modern dictionary for Ancient Greek, it brings together 140,000 headwords taken from the literature, papyri, inscriptions and other sources of the archaic period up to the 6th Century CE, and occasionally beyond. The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is an invaluable companion for the study of Classics and Ancient Greek, for beginning students and advanced scholars alike.
Translated and edited under the auspices of The Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC, The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is based on the completely revised 3rd Italian edition published in 2013 by Loescher Editore, Torino.

Features:
• The principal parts of some 15,000 verbs are listed directly following the entry and its etymology. For each of these forms, the occurrence in the ancient texts has been certified. When found only once, the location is cited.
• Nearly all entries include citations from the texts with careful mention of the source.
• The dictionary is especially rich in personal names re-checked against the sources for the 3rd Italian edition, and in scientific terms, which have been categorized according to discipline.
• Each entry has a clear structure and typography making it easy to navigate.

"For a number of years now, scholars at ease in Italian have benefitted enormously from the riches, layout, concision, and accuracy of Professor Montanari's Vocabolario della Lingua Greca, with its added advantage of the inclusion of names. Hence classicists in general will welcome the English version of this very valuable resource." - Professor Richard Janko, University of Michigan
“Franco Montanari is a giant in our field, and his Dictionary is a major leap forward for us….” - Professor Gregory Nagy, Harvard University
As with any dictionary of a newly discovered dead language, the aim of this Dictionary of the Ugaritic alphabetic texts is to indicate the stage reached in its lexical description and to serve as a reference work for further study. In this connection, the main interpretative opinions have been included, since to a large extent Ugaritic lexicography remains uncertain. Also the most relevant comparative Semitic material has been provided in order to corroborate the lexical choices adopted by the authors and help readers to verify their own. The new material discovered since 1992 and recently published has also been included, along with all the personal and topographical names as in the two previous editions.
J. F. Niermeyer's Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus is a highly practical lexicon, providing researchers, teaching staff and students in the field of Medieval History with concise, essential information. Niermeyer Online on Brill’s Dictionary Platform is still the “compendious lexicon for rapid information” envisaged by Niermeyer and is the only online version based on the very latest print edition (content expanded by 10% in 2002). This last update also provided French, English and German translations for every entry of a Medieval Latin concept. Niermeyer Online offers searches on lemma and full text: searches can be refined by century of use. All entries are contextualized with relevant text passages. Niermeyer’s Lexicon Minus has established a reputation over more than 50 years as an invaluable, authoritative, and highly rated resource for medievalists, and Niermeyer Online is certain to be an indispensable working tool for historians working inside or outside an academic library.
Wörterbuch zu den Schriften Gregors von Nyssa
Author: Friedhelm Mann
The result of more than three decades of dedicated scholarly research, the Lexicon Gregorianum constitutes the most comprehensive dictionary ever produced of the language of Gregory of Nyssa. The Lexicon Gregorianum is, and will remain for the foreseeable future, the only dictionary available that specifically addresses the vocabulary of late Classical Greek. This seminal German-Greek reference work is far more than a list of words: it documents Gregory's entire vocabulary, taking account of the syntax, meaning and connotations of every occurrence of a key word in his writings. The complete Lexicon comprises 10 volumes, totaling more than 13,000 entries.
The second edition of A Dictionary of Tocharian B includes substantially all Tocharian B words found in regularly published texts, as well as all those of the London and Paris collections published digitally (digital publication of the Paris collection is still incomplete), and a substantial number of the Berlin collection published digitally. The number of entries is more than twenty per cent greater than in the first edition. The overall approach is decidedly philological. All words except proper names are provided with example contexts. Each word is given in all its various attested morphological forms, in its variant spellings, and discussed semantically, syntactically (where appropriate), and etymologically. New to the second edition is the assignment, where possible, of the examples of the word’s use to their exact chronological period (Archaic, Early, Classical, Late/Colloquial). This dating provides the beginning of the study of the Tocharian B vocabulary on a historical basis. Included are also a reverse English-Tocharian B index and, another innovation to this edition, a general index verborum of Indo-European cognates.
The Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online (IEDO) reconstructs the lexicon for the most important languages and language branches of Indo-European. It is a rich and voluminous online reference source for historical and general linguists. Dictionaries can be cross-searched, with an advance search for each individual dictionary enabling the user to perform more complex research queries. Each entry is accompanied by grammatical info, meaning(s), etymological commentary, reconstructions, cognates and often extensive bibliographical information. Content will be updated and added on a regular basis. The latest addition is the Lithuanian Etymological Dictionary by Ernst Fraenkel.

Features and Benefits
- Includes 15 dictionaries
- Contains over 20.000 entries
- Covers over 150 languages
- Rich bibliographical references for further research
- Export, print and save records
- Cross-searchable database, supporting simple and complex queries
- Unicode compliant, displaying and searching complex characters and diacritics


Included Dictionaries:
Lithuanian Etymological Dictionary, Ernst Fraenkel
Etymological Dictionary of the Baltic Inherited Lexicon, Rick Derksen
Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic, Guus Kroonen
Etymological Dictionary of Greek, Robert Beekes with the assistance of Lucien van Beek
Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic, Ranko Matasović
Etymological Dictionary of the Armenian Inherited Lexicon, Hrach K. Martirosyan
Etymological Dictionary of Latin, Michiel de Vaan
Reconstructing Proto-Nostratic, Allan R. Bomhard
Etymological Dictionary of the Hittite Inherited Lexicon, Alwin Kloekhorst
Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon, Rick Derksen
Etymological Dictionary of the Iranian Verb, Johnny Cheung
Old Frisian Etymological Dictionary, Dirk Boutkan and Sjoerd Michiel Siebinga
Cuneiform Luvian Lexicon, H. Craig Melchert
Etymological Dictionary of Tocharian B, Douglas Q. Adams
Materials for an Etymological Database of North Lechitic Dialects, Konstantin K. Bogatyrev

The Qurʾan is the living source of all Islamic teaching, and is of singular importance to those interested in Islam and the study of religions. Despite this, there exists a long-felt lack of research tools for English first-language speakers who wish to access the Qurʾan in the original Arabic.
The Dictionary of Qurʾanic Usage is the first comprehensive, fully-researched and contextualised Arabic-English dictionary of Qurʾanic usage, compiled in accordance with modern lexicographical methods by scholars who have a lifelong immersion in Qurʾanic Studies. Based on Classical Arabic dictionaries and Qurʾan commentaries, this work also emphasises the role of context in determining the meaning-scatter of each vocabulary item. Illustrative examples from Qurʾanic verses are provided in support of the definitions given for each context in which a particular word occurs, with cross-references to other usages. Frequently occurring grammatical particles are likewise thoroughly explained, insofar as they are used in conveying various nuances of meaning in the text.
Author: Gábor Takács
This is the third and final volume of the Etymological Dictionary of Egyptian. It comprises the Egyptian words with initial m-. The amount of material offered, the extensive treatment of scholarly discussions on each item, and the insights into the connections of Egyptian and the related Afro-Asiatic (Semito-Hamitic) languages, including many new lexical parallels, will make it an indispensable tool for comparative purposes and an unchallenged starting point for every linguist in the field.
The reader will find the etymological entries even more detailed than those of the introductory volume, due to the full retrospective presentation of all etymologies proposed since A. Erman's time, and thanks to an extremely detailed discussion of all possible relevant data even on the less known Afro-Asiatic cognates to the Egyptian roots.
This glossary is an up-to-date research tool for the study of population in English, Japanese and German. Based on the technical literature, encyclopedias, databases and existing glossaries in the three languages listed as well as other relevant languages in which demographic research is carried out, it comprises more than 7500 technical terms accessible in three directions: English-Japanese-German, Japanese-English-German and German-Japanese-English.

Scientific fields covered include social demography, popu