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Editorial-board Peter Bisschop, Dominic Goodall, Harunaga Isaacson and G.J. Meulenbeld

The Supplement to the Groningen Oriental Studies publishes the critical edition and study of the Skandapurāṇa. The series is published under the auspices of the J. Gonda Foundation (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences).

The series published three volumes over the last 5 years.

Series:

William Collins

This study presents the text and translation of an oral epic, or guritan, relating the exploits of Radin Suane, which was recorded during anthropological fieldwork among the Besemah, in the remote highlands of South Sumatra. Documentation of an epic in Besemah, a little known Sumatran-Malay language, will be useful for comparative purposes to specialists in Malaysian and Indonesian languages and literatures. This work is also intended to serve students of ethnography, folklore and oral poetry, as well as general readers who may not be familiar with Sumatran culture. Accordingly, an extensive commentary has been provided to give a cultural context for understanding this epic.

Series:

Edited by R. Adriaensen, Bakker and H. Isaacson

This volume presents Adhyāyas 1-25 from the Skandapurāṇa, critically edited, with an introduction and English synopsis. The text presented here is proven beyond a reasonable doubt to be the original Skandapuranā, the earliest surviving work to bear this name.

The Bakhshālī Manuscript

An Ancient Indian Mathematical Treatise

Series:

Takao Hayashi

The Bakhshālī Manuscript is an old birch-bark manuscript which treats mathematics in Sanskrit. It was unearthed by a farmer in AD 1881 at the small village of Bakhshālī, about eighty kilometers north-east of Peshawar, one of the important trading centers of the ancient Gandhāra district (now Pakistan).

It was studied by eminent Indologists and historians of mathematics of the time, yet a number of mathematical rules and examples in it were either left undeciphered or misunderstood due to the fragmentary nature of the manuscript, the irregularities of the language, and the fact that the study of the history of Indian mathematics was in an early stage. The dating of the manuscript as well as of the work in it has also been long a matter of controversy. The dates estimated range from the early centuries of the Christian era to the twelfth century.

The situation has been much improved, however, by quite a few studies on Indian mathematics that appeared after those pioneering works, and by the publication of two Sanskrit works, Bhāskara’s commentary on the Aryabhaṭīya and Srīdhara’s Paṭīgaṇita with an old commentary, which have greatly enhanced our knowledge of Indian mathematics of the seventh and eighth centuries.

This book offers a fresh translation of the manuscript, the first English translation of the whole text based on a systematic study of linguistic peculiarities, and a mathematical commentary based on a comparative study of the Bakhshālī work and other Sanskrit mathematical texts, including the two mentioned above. The Introduction attempts to locate the Bakhshālī work properly within the history of Indian mathematics.

Series:

Edited by T. Goudriaan and J.A. Schoterman

The two main constituents of the Hindu ritual-speculative tradition, the Vedic and the Tantric, are often considered to be more or less antagonistic. The actual situation is less simple: there are resemblances, intersections and combinations, which tend to fuse both elements into a continuous tradition. The Kubjikā Upaniṣad is a unique document which illustrates this continuity.

The text consists of twenty-five chapters, which have never before been edited or translated. It belongs to the corpus of the younger, so-called ‘sectarian’ Upaniṣads. The critical edition was prepared by Schoterman from three manuscripts. After his untimely death, Goudriaan finalized the edition and added the translation, an introduction, and an appendix in which four more (fragmentary) manuscripts are evaluated. The text is basically Tantric; it reveals mantras and mandṇḍalas of the goddess Kubjikā and other members of her pantheon, supplemented by a digression on the morning-worship of the Goddess. The Vedic element consists of more than 100 Atharvavedic stanzas, sometimes of high literary quality, integrated into the Kubjikan ritual system. In addition, there are descriptions of magical rites in a true Atharvanic vein. All this results in a not perfectly harmonized, yet undoubtedly intriguing and partly still mysterious, text, which shows the development and practice of Goddess worship in South Asia from an unexpected point of view.

Series:

D.H Heilijgers

The Kubjikāmatatantra in its Kulālikāmnāya version represents the primary literary source for the cult of the Hindu goddess Kubjikā. Three out of its twenty-five chapters, that is chapters 14-16, are devoted to a discussion of five cakras forming a system hitherto unknown. These five cakras are the seat of a great number of goddesses - called the Devīs, the Dūtīs, the Mātṛs, the Yoginīs and the Khecarīs, respectively - and, to a lesser degree, of male deities as well.

Heilijgers’ study presents a detailed examination of the esoteric doctrine concerning these cakras. After an introduction and a chapter on some general features of the flve cakras, each of the next five chapters deals with one separate cakra, discussing its presiding deities, its location in the human body and its symbolism. The second part contains the Sanskrit text of chapters 14-16 of the Kubjikāmatatantra, the annotated translation of these chapters and some appendices.

The book offers a valuable contribution to a more thorough understanding of and insight into the Kubjikā doctrine, which occupies an important position within the Śakta oriented Hindu Tantric tradition.

The Rāsa Māna ke Pada of Kevalarāma

A Medieval Hindi Text of the Eighth Gaddī of the Vallabha Sect

Series:

Alan W. Entwistle

This book of the well-known Braj specialist, Prof Dr A.W. Entwistle (University of Washington), focuses on the medieval tradition of the eighth branch of the Vallabha sect.

The lengthy introduction deals with the sectarian background of the branch, including a survey of the relevant tradition and history of medieval Vaiṣṇava devotion as a whole and the Vallabha sect in particular. It discusses the structure of the Puṣṭimārga and its gaddīs, or branches, since Rāsa Māna ke Pada is part of the literary heritage of the sect’s Eighth Gaddī which, until partition in 1947, was based at Dera Ghazi Khan (now in Pakistan). It gives a , survey of the life and works of the founders of this gaddī, ŚrI Lālajī, and of his grandson Kevalarāma.

Due attention is also paid to the language of the text and in an appendix a comparative etymological glossary is given that cites examples from other Braj Bhāṣā authors in order to support interpretations of the more obscure words and idioms.

The main part of the book consists of a critical edition of the Rāsa Māna ke Pada, a collection of poems attributed to Kevalarāma, and an annotated translation into English.

The Battle for Junk Ceylon

The Syair Sultan Maulana

Series:

C. Skinner

The Battle for Junk Ceylon presents a new scholarly edition of the text of the Malay “ballad” known as the Syair Sultan Maulana, together with an English translation. This long poem was written during the second decade of the 19th century by the secretary to the Lakasamana (Admiral) of the sultanate of Kedah. It gives an eye-witness account if the events which occurred during the early part of the reign of Sultan Ahmad Tajuddin, in particular the part played by the Kedah fleet in helping the Siamese to expel the Burmese form the island of Phuket (“Junk Ceylon”) on the west coast of southern Thailand.
The accuracy and relative lack of bias on the part of the author make this Malay text a primary source of some importance, and accordingly the editor has concentrated his attention on the historical features of the text, in particular the military and naval aspects of the Junk Ceylon campaign, thereby also making use of sources in Thai in order to paint a remarkably clear picture of the course of the events.

Series:

S.O. Robson

This edition of the Classical Malay prose work, the Hikajat Andakén Penurat includes an English translation and an Introduction explaining the place of the work in Malay literature. The Hikajat Andakén Penurat tells the story of the prince Raden Andakén Penurat and his beloved, Kèn Tambuhan. It is closely related to the Shair Kèn Tambuhan, a poem that has appeared in several editions. The story is relatively short and well written; it is representative of its genre. The book is especially intended for readers who have little or no knowledge of Malay.

Series:

J.J. Ras

Text and translation of a hitherto unpublished chronicle of the most important Malay colony in Borneo. Hikayat Bandjar is a highly valuable body of material for the study of Indonesian cultural history. The author gives a textual and philological analysis of its contents. In the introduction he discusses earlier publications on the Hikajat Bandjar, the condition of the manuscripts, the language in which the text is written, and the (scholarly) appreciation expressed for Malay chronicles in the past. In the following chapter Ras gives summaries and comparisons of recensions I and II of the Hikajat Bandjar, and looks at parallels with other Malay and Javanese stories. He also discusses the Malay colony in Southeast Borneo and its contacts with Java.