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Gertjan Verhasselt

This book is the first volume to appear in print since 1999 in Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker Continued, which continues Felix Jacoby’s monumental but uncompleted collection of fragmentary Greek historiography. It is part of section IV B (History of Literature, Music, Art and Culture) and provides a critical edition, translation and commentary of the fragments of Dikaiarchos, a pupil of Aristotle from late fourth century BCE. Dikaiarchos wrote about cultural history, literature, philosophers, politics, geography, ethics and the soul. The book advances the state of the art by presenting a new text and demarcation of the fragments, a study of the method of the authors citing Dikaiarchos, new readings and interpretations of the fragments and a reassessment of Dikaiarchos’ value as a historian.

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L.S. Filius

Aristotle’s Historia Animalium is one of the most famous and influential zoological works that was ever written. It was translated into Arabic in the 9th century CE together with Aristotle’s other zoological works, On the Generation of Animals and On the Parts of Animals. As a result, the influence of Aristotelian zoology is widely traceable in classical Arabic literary culture and thought. The Arabic translation found its way into Europe through the 13th-century Latin translation by Michael Scotus, which was extensively used by medieval European scholars. A critical edition of the Arabic Historia Animalium has long been awaited, and Lourus Filius’s edition, based on all extant Arabic MSS, as well as on Scotus’s Latin translation, can rightly be seen as a scholarly landmark.

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Edited by Anne-Marie Wittke

Ranging in time from the end of the Bronze Age to the dawn of the so-called historical period (12th-6th centuries BC), this compendium presents the first complete survey of the early history of all the cultures along the coasts of the Mediterranean. In addition to the Phoenicians, Greeks and Etruscans, these also include many other peoples, such as the Iberians, Ligurians, Thracians, Phrygians, Luwians, Aramaeans and Libyans. The volume brings together the knowledge gained from material, textual and pictorial sources in all disciplines working in this field, including Near Eastern, Phoenician, Carthaginian and biblical archaeology, Aegean and North African studies, Villanovan studies and Etruscology, Iberology, early Greek historiography and Dark Ages studies. As a whole, this period was characterized by the intermingling of cultures around the Mediterranean Rim, and the main focus of content is therefore on contacts, the transfer of culture and knowledge and key common themes, such as mobility, religion, resources, languages and writing. With indices and numerous tables and maps of Pauly quality.
This English version has been edited by John Noel Dillon and translated by Duncan A. Smart

Le plaisir, le bonheur, et l’acquisition des vertus: Édition du Livre X du Commentaire moyen d’Averroès à l’Éthique à Nicomaque d’Aristote

Accompagnée d’une traduction française annotée, et précédée de deux études sur le Commentaire moyen d’Averroès à l’Éthique à Nicomaque

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Frédérique Woerther

This volume contains the first edition of the Latin version of the Middle Commentary of Averroes on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics Book X, the original arabic version being lost. It is accompanied by an annotated French translation. The volume also contains a full study of the manuscript tradition of the Latin text and sets outs the principles used in the edition, which takes into account, where necessary, the Hebrew version of the Commentary. Two further studies complete the volume: the first is devoted to the genre of “Middle Commentary” ( talḫīṣ); the second considers how Averroes uses an analogy with medicine to place ethics at the heart of practical philosophy, and how, in a manner that is foreign to Aristotle, he conceives of ethics as a “science.” Ce volume propose la toute première édition, accompagnée d’une traduction française annotée, de la version latine du Commentaire moyen d’Averroès à l’Éthique à Nicomaque d’Aristote Livre X, dont l’original arabe est perdu. Il présente également une étude complète de la tradition manuscrite du texte latin, et les principes d’édition, qui prennent en compte, ponctuellement, la version hébraïque du Commentaire. Deux études viennent compléter ce volume: l’une, consacrée à la notion de “commentaire moyen” ( talḫīṣ), l’autre à la place qu’Averroès — par le biais d’une analogie avec la médecine — réserve à l’éthique au sein de la philosophie pratique, et à la façon dont il conçoit désormais, de façon non aristotélicienne, l’éthique comme une “science.”

ʿUbaidallāh Ibn Buḫtīšūʿ on Apparent Death

The Kitāb Taḥrīm dafn al-aḥyāʾ, Arabic Edition and English Translation with a Hebrew Supplement by Gerrit Bos

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Oliver Kahl and Gerrit Bos

The Kitāb Taḥrīm dafn al-aḥyāʾ, the Book on the Prohibition to Bury the Living, written by the Nestorian physician ʿUbaidallāh Ibn Buḫtīšūʿ (d. c. 1060 CE), deals with the causes, signs and treatments of apparent death. Based on a short pseudo-Galenic treatise, whose Greek original is lost, ʿUbaidallāh’s Arabic commentary is a comprehensive and in many ways unique piece of scientific writing that moreover promotes a psychological understanding of physical illness. Oliver Kahl’s present book offers a critical Arabic edition with annotated English translation of ʿUbaidallāh’s work on apparent death, framed by a detailed introductory study and extensive glossaries covering all relevant terms; for comparative purposes, the Arabic and Hebrew recensions of the lost Greek prototype are presented in an appendix.

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Edited by Angelos Chaniotis, Thomas Corsten, Nikolaos Papazarkadas, Eftychia Stavrianopoulou and Rolf Tybout

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Edited by Manfred Landfester

The period of the Renaissance (late 14th to early 17th centuries) saw the most intensive reception of Antiquity in European history. The rediscovery, appropriation and further development of the accomplishments of the ancients had a crucial influence in all spheres of early modern culture. This lexicon of Renaissance Humanism traces these processes from the career of Petrarch to the period of the Reformation and confessionalization, in 130 comprehensive articles covering topics, personalities and places of importance in the history of the Humanist movement.
Translated and edited by Duncan A. Smart and Chad M. Schroeder.

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Edited by Angelos Chaniotis, Thomas Corsten, Nikolaos Papazarkadas and Rolf Tybout

SEG LXI covers the publications of the year 2011, with occasional additions from previous years that we missed in earlier volumes and from studies published after 2010 but pertaining to material from 2011.

Franco Montanari

Edited by Madeleine Goh and Chad Schroeder

Winner of the 2016 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award

The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is also available as a single volume and online. This luxury edition offers the same high-quality content as the regular edition but is bound in two slimmer volumes with linen stamped covers and comes in a linen-clad box..

The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is the English translation of Franco Montanari’s Vocabolario della Lingua Greca. With an established reputation as the most important modern dictionary for Ancient Greek, it brings together 140,000 headwords taken from the literature, papyri, inscriptions and other sources of the archaic period up to the 6th Century CE, and occasionally beyond. The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is an invaluable companion for the study of Classics and Ancient Greek, for beginning students and advanced scholars alike.
Translated and edited under the auspices of The Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC, The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is based on the completely revised 3rd Italian edition published in 2013 by Loescher Editore, Torino.

Features
• The principal parts of some 15,000 verbs are listed directly following the entry and its etymology. For each of these forms, the occurrence in the ancient texts has been certified. When found only once, the location is cited.
• Nearly all entries include citations from the texts with careful mention of the source.
• The dictionary is especially rich in personal names re-checked against the sources for the 3rd Italian edition, and in scientific terms, which have been categorized according to discipline.
• Each entry has a clear structure and typography making it easy to navigate.

"For a number of years now, scholars at ease in Italian have benefitted enormously from the riches, layout, concision, and accuracy of Professor Montanari's Vocabolario della Lingua Greca, with its added advantage of the inclusion of names. Hence classicists in general will welcome the English version of this very valuable resource." Professor Richard Janko, University of Michigan

“Franco Montanari is a giant in our field, and his Dictionary is a major leap forward for us….” Professor Gregory Nagy, Harvard University

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Edited by Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider

This Index volume to Brill’s New Pauly: Encyclopedia of the Ancient World relates to the Antiquity volumes (volumes 1–15) and apart from indices, it also provides new materials to aid the reader in the study of the Ancient World. The first part of the volume consists of systematic guides, arranged by theme, to the entries relating to subjects and to persons. A concordance of geographical names helps the reader find ancient places by looking up the modern equivalents. An index of the maps and illustrations and a list of all contributors to these volumes completes the indices. The second half of this volume contains entirely new matter. It presents various lists and tables detailing laws and law codes, treaties, papyri, ostraka and manuscripts; weight, volume and monetary systems; as well as chronologies and time calculation systems. Together these form an indispensible gateway to the more than 15,000 entries of this part of the Encyclopedia.