Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • Reference Work x
  • Primary Source Collection x
  • History & Culture x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
The Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf, Oman and Central Arabia is one of the most important European primary sources for the study of the modern Gulf region from the 17th to the early 20th century. The Gazetteer was compiled and written by John Gordon Lorimer (1870-1914), an official of the Indian Civil Service. The Gazetteer was intended as handbook for British policy makers and agents in the area. The wealth of historical, political and geographical information from which Lorimer composed the Gazetteer was sourced from official documents of the British government in India and the Gulf, from British naval and military establishments and the East India Company archives, and first-hand research and surveys. It is the fullest account of the state of knowledge of the region in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and as such is still an important tool for researchers.
This full-text searchable online version offers scholars and students unique possibilities to study and consult this important work.
Advisory Editor: Arnoud Vrolijk
The Middle Eastern Manuscripts Online collections consists of the following collections:
- Middle Eastern Manuscripts Online 1: Pioneer Orientalists: The Manuscript Collections of Scaliger, Raphelengius and Golius from Leiden University Libraries
- Middle Eastern Manuscripts Online 2: The Ottoman Legacy of Levinus Warner: 140 volumes from the Warner Collection, totaling 45,809 pages of Ottoman Turkish, Arabic, and Persian texts. All these manuscripts were acquired by the great scholar Levinus Warner during his stay in Istanbul from 1644 until his death in 1665
- Middle Eastern Manuscripts Online 3: Arabic Manuscripts from the Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest: The manuscript holdings of the Oriental Collection in the Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, consisting of 200 manuscripts.
Brill in cooperation with the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, for the first time brings together a unique collection of rare primary sources on a vital and dynamic part of the history of Turkey, Russia, the Middle East and Western Europe Russian-Ottoman Relations. During the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, the balance of power between Russia and the Ottoman Empire was constantly monitored in Western Europe, where several powers had designs of their own on some of the Ottoman territories. In Germany and France, in particular, all kinds of accounts, opinions, and plans were published that were influenced by, or aimed to influence, Russian-Ottoman relations. They include publications of relevant government documents, diplomatic reports, travel accounts that provided new details about hitherto relatively unknown regions, and fiercely political (and polemical) tracts and pamphlets designed to rally public support for one power or the other. Published across Europe over a period of two centuries, these sources provide detailed insights not only in the military ebb and flow of Russian-Ottoman relations, but also in their effects on European public opinion.

This series currently consists of 4 parts:
Part 1: The Origins 1600-1800
Part 2: Shifts in the Balance of Power, 1800-1853
Part 3: The Crimean War 1854-1856
Part 4: The End of the Empires, 1857-1914