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Edited by Anne-Marie Wittke

Ranging in time from the end of the Bronze Age to the dawn of the so-called historical period (12th-6th centuries BC), this compendium presents the first complete survey of the early history of all the cultures along the coasts of the Mediterranean. In addition to the Phoenicians, Greeks and Etruscans, these also include many other peoples, such as the Iberians, Ligurians, Thracians, Phrygians, Luwians, Aramaeans and Libyans. The volume brings together the knowledge gained from material, textual and pictorial sources in all disciplines working in this field, including Near Eastern, Phoenician, Carthaginian and biblical archaeology, Aegean and North African studies, Villanovan studies and Etruscology, Iberology, early Greek historiography and Dark Ages studies. As a whole, this period was characterized by the intermingling of cultures around the Mediterranean Rim, and the main focus of content is therefore on contacts, the transfer of culture and knowledge and key common themes, such as mobility, religion, resources, languages and writing. With indices and numerous tables and maps of Pauly quality.
This English version has been edited by John Noel Dillon and translated by Duncan A. Smart

Edited by Angelos Chaniotis, Thomas Corsten, Nikolaos Papazarkadas, Eftychia Stavrianopoulou and Rolf Tybout

Edited by Angelos Chaniotis, Thomas Corsten, Nikolaos Papazarkadas and Rolf Tybout

SEG LXII covers the publications of the year 2012, with occasional additions from previous years that we missed in earlier volumes and from studies published after 2011 but pertaining to material from 2012.

Edited by Angelos Chaniotis, Thomas Corsten, Nikolaos Papazarkadas and Rolf Tybout

SEG LXI covers the publications of the year 2011, with occasional additions from previous years that we missed in earlier volumes and from studies published after 2010 but pertaining to material from 2011.

Edited by Angelos Chaniotis, Thomas Corsten, Nikolaos Papazarkadas and Rolf Tybout

SEG LX covers the publications of the year 2010, with occasional additions from previous years that we missed in earlier volumes and from studies published after 2009 but pertaining to material from 2010.

Iusti Lipsii Saturnalium Sermonum libri duo, qui de gladiatoribus

Lipsius' Saturnaliengespräche, eine textkritische Ausgabe mit Übersetzung, Einführung und Anmerkungen

Series:

Edited by Andrea Steenbeek

Thema von Lipsius’ Saturnaliengespräche (1582) sind die Gladiatorenspiele. Alle Aspekte werden beleuchtet, zum Beispiel, welche Arten Gladiatoren es gab: da waren Kriminelle, aber auch hohe Beamte dabei, die – manchmal freiwillig – als Gladiatoren funktionierten. Die detaillierte Beschreibung schließt gut an bei seinen anderen historiographischen Werken, wie De Amphitheatro (1584). Am Ende der Saturnaliengespräche steht eine schwungvolle Rede über die bewundernswerten Beständigkeit der Gladiatoren. Lipsius spricht in verschiedenen Briefen über sie als leuchtende Vorbilder. Das passt zu seinem Vorhaben, die Stoa von Neuem bekannt zu machen. Er hatte dabei Erfolg, denn seine stoische Lehre erhielt viel Zuhörerschaft. De Constantia, das er 1584 zum ersten Mal publizierte, erfuhr zahllose Auflagen und Übersetzungen.

In his Saturnalian dialogues (1582), Lipsius describes all aspects of gladiatorial combat, for example, that a great variety of people – criminals but also highly placed officials – took part in the combats, sometimes as volunteers. This detailed description fits into Lipsius’ other historiographical works, such as De Amphitheatro, published in 1584. After an elaborate exposition about gladiators, in the last chapter of the Saturnalian dialogues he gives an impassioned speech about their admirable constancy despite extremely hard circumstances. In several letters, Lipsius also refers to gladiators as proper models to be imitated. His main aim, here and elsewhere, was the promotion of his Stoic ethic – a goal that would ultimately prove successful: De Constantia, first published in 1584, has gone through a large number of reprints, editions and translations.

Edited by Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider

This Index volume to Brill’s New Pauly: Encyclopedia of the Ancient World relates to the Antiquity volumes (volumes 1–15) and apart from indices, it also provides new materials to aid the reader in the study of the Ancient World. The first part of the volume consists of systematic guides, arranged by theme, to the entries relating to subjects and to persons. A concordance of geographical names helps the reader find ancient places by looking up the modern equivalents. An index of the maps and illustrations and a list of all contributors to these volumes completes the indices. The second half of this volume contains entirely new matter. It presents various lists and tables detailing laws and law codes, treaties, papyri, ostraka and manuscripts; weight, volume and monetary systems; as well as chronologies and time calculation systems. Together these form an indispensible gateway to the more than 15,000 entries of this part of the Encyclopedia.
Supplementum Epigraphicum Graecum (SEG) is an annual publication collecting newly published Greek inscriptions and studies on previously known documents. Material later than the 8th century A.D. is not included. Supplementum Epigraphicum Graecum presents complete Greek texts of all new inscriptions with a critical apparatus; it summarizes new readings, interpretations and studies of known inscriptions, and occasionally presents the Greek text of these documents. Inscriptions are listed by their provenance, e.g. Dodona or Abdera. These place names are grouped into regions, such as Attica or Illyria. In the SEG Online, in order to keep lists and loading times short, these regions are grouped into several larger areas: 1. Greece 2. North 3. Aegean 4. West 5. Asia Minor 6. East
This list serves as the table of contents of the SEG Online. You can click on an area to go to the list of regions and click on a region for the list of place names and click on a place name for the inscriptions found there.
Lemma Structure Each lemma has a unique identifi er made up from the printed volume and sequence number, e.g. 50-326. (Note that the SEG Online uses Arabic numerals, not Roman). This number is followed by a heading stating origin, type and date of the inscription, e.g. Kos. Funerary epigram for Nikaia, 2nd cent. A.D.
Features and Benefits - Full text and advanced search options - Extensive indices, e.g. - Names of Men and Women; Mythological Names; Names of Ships and Animals; Latin Names; Patronymic Adjectives; Kings, Dynasts and their Families; Roman Emperors and their Families; Geographical Names (except Attica); Attic Tribes, Demes, Etc.; Tribes, Demes outside Attica; Latin Geographical Names; Religious Terms; Latin Terms; Military (and Paramilitary) terms; Greek World; Roman World; Latin Terms; Important Greek words; (Important) Latin Words - Quick references search to easily find the lemma - Annual addition of the latest SEG volume - Full text search using the Greek character set - Advanced search within metadata, indices and concordances
Supplementum Epigraphicum Graecum is also available in print, visit www.brill.com/SEG> for more information.
Jacoby Online now includes the Second Edition of Brill's New Jacoby - the first 180 entries are online.

Jacoby Online is one of the most authoritative resources for the study of fragmentary ancient Greek historians. It includes five bundled products:
1. Felix Jacoby’s seminal Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker: Parts I-III (complete)
2. Brill’s New Jacoby (BNJ), a thoroughly revised English edition of Felix Jacoby’s Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker: Parts I-III (nearly complete, estimated date of completion: 2019)
3. Brill’s New Jacoby – Second Edition (BNJ2), a revised edition of Brill’s New Jacoby (BNJ), now with apparatus criticus, as well as updated bibliographies and revised commentaries (launched in 2016; estimated date of completion: 2026)
4. Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker Part IV: Biography and Antiquarian Literature (FGrH IV), a continuation of Felix Jacoby’s work including original Greek texts with translations and commentaries (estimated date of completion: 2027)
5. Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker Part V: Geography (FGrH V), a continuation of Felix Jacoby’s work including original Greek texts with translations and commentary (estimated date of completion: 2020)

Jacoby Online is updated twice a year.

1. Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker Parts I - III is Felix Jacoby's monumental critical edition of 856 Greek historians whose work is preserved incompletely, i.e. in fragments. Felix Jacoby collected these fragments and edited them, adding biographical testimonies and extensive commentaries.
- The original standard work
- Fully searchable with easy links to the new editions and translations and commentaries in Brill’s New Jacoby

2. Brill’s New Jacoby (BNJ)
General Editor: Ian Worthington (Macquarie University, Sydney)
Brill's New Jacoby is a fully-revised and enlarged edition of Jacoby’s Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker I-III, providing new texts of the ancient authors in many instances as well as several new authors and many new fragments of existing authors that were either unknown to Jacoby or excluded by him. Especially important is that for the first time ever commentaries are provided on the final 248 authors in FGrHist I-III, which Jacoby was unable to prepare before his death. In addition, and also for the first time, BNJ presents facing English translations of all the testimonia and fragments, new, critical commentaries on all the testimony and fragments, and a brief encyclopedia-style entry about each historian’s life and works, with a select bibliography.
• New English translations of all testimonia and fragments
• New introductions to the Historians
• New critical commentaries
• New bibliographies
• 248 new historians (planned by Jacoby but never completed)
• 15% new content added twice a year

3. Brill’s New Jacoby, Second Edition (BNJ2)
General Editor: Ian Worthington (Macquarie University, Sydney)
BNJ2 was launched in October 2016 and is a revised and enlarged edition of Brill’s New Jacoby. New additions include an apparatus criticus and a discussion of the provenance of each fragment where relevant, as well as revised commentaries on the ancient authors in BNJ and updated bibliographies, all of which set BNJ2 significantly apart from the previous edition.
Like Brill’s New Jacoby, this revised edition has texts and historians not included in Jacoby’s Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker I-III. It provides English translations to all testimonia and fragments, critical commentaries, and a brief encyclopedia-style entry about the historian’s life and works, with a select bibliography.

Brill's New Jacoby, Second Edition is a work-in-progress with publication of the last historian scheduled for 2026.

4. Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker Part IV: Biography and Antiquarian Literature
General Editor: Stefan Schorn (KU Leuven)
Part IV: Biography and Antiquarian Literature of Felix Jacoby’s original planned work Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker started in the 1990’s, and will ultimately consist of 27 book volumes presenting the original Greek texts with completely new translations and extensive commentaries by a team of international experts.
• Completely NEW material
• Original critical Greek texts with translations and commentaries
• New authors edited online since 2013
• New volumes are being written and added to Jacoby Online starting in 2017
• A projected total 27 “volumes” are planned over the next 10-15 years

5. Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker Part V: Die Geographen
General Editors: Hans-Joachim Gehrke and Felix Maier (University of Freiburg), in collaboration with Veronica Bucciantini
Part V: Die Geographen offers work that was left uncompleted by Jacoby and contains completely new material giving the original Greek texts with translations and commentaries. This project is expected to be completed in 2020 and will consist of the fragments and testimonia of 96 Greek historians.
• Original Greek texts with translations and commentaries
• First instalment was published in 2011

Features and Benefits of Jacoby Online
- Toggle between Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker I - V and Brill's New Jacoby, first and second edition
- Open URL icon
- Hyperlinks to other articles, or to other parts of the article
- Original text
- En face English translations of the Greek fragments and testimonia
- Search using Greek Character Set
- Extensive indexes and search categories
- Full text search
- Quick search of historians or text of interest
- Commentaries and bibliographies of historians
- Navigate through the article, or through related articles
- Extensive indexes and search categories

Print Options
Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker I-III is available as a complete set, and as individual volumes. Part IV and Part V will be published in print too. The first three volumes have been published in the 1990s and three more are planned for 2017-2018. For more information on the print volumes, please view www.brill.com/fgh

Brill’s New Jacoby, first and second edition, will not be published in print.

Edited by Angelos Prof. Dr. Chaniotis, Thomas Dr. Corsten, R.S. Stroud and Rolf Dr. Tybout

SEG LII covers the publications of the year 2002, with occasional additions from previous years that we missed in earlier volumes and from studies published after 2002 but pertaining to material from 2002.