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The Skandapurāṇa Volume IIb

Adhyāyas 31-52. The Vāhana and Naraka Cycles

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Edited by Hans Bakker, Yuko Yokochi and Peter Bisschop

Skandapurāṇa IIb presents a critical edition of Adhyāyas 31-52 from the Skandapurāṇa, with an introduction and English synopsis. The text edited in this volume includes central myths of early Śaivism, such as the destruction of Dakṣa's sacrifice and Śiva acquiring the bull for his vehicle. Also included is an extensive description of the thirteen hells (Naraka).

The Skandapurāṇa III

Adhyayas 34.1-61, 53-69: The Vindhyavāsinī Cycle

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Yuko Yokochi

Skandapurāṇa III presents a critical edition of the Vindhyavāsinī Cycle (Adhyāyas 34.1-61, 53-69) from the Skandapurāṇa , with an introduction and annotated English synopsis. The text edited in this volume provides the oldest full account of the myth of the goddess of the Vindhya mountains; it is one of the main sources of the Devīmāhātmya, the most famous scripture of the goddess worship in India, and as such indispensable for the study of the history of goddess worship. The introduction contains an examination into the relationship of the manuscripts and the date of the Skandapurāṇa .
The work is currently only available in print as an exact reprint done in a smaller book size (15.5 x 23.5 cm) than the first printrun.

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Edited by J. Noorduyn and A. Teeuw

Preserved on undated palm-leaf manuscripts, Old Sundanese texts are generally in poor condition and unavailable to a wider audience. There are limited texts in any form of Sundanese, and only limited knowledge of Old Sundanese. In presenting three long Old Sundanese poems, Noorduyn and Teeuw, in a heretofore unequalled English-language study of Old Sundanese literature, bring to the light works of importance for further linguistic, literary and historical research.
The three poems, The Sons of Rama and Rawana, The ascension of Sri Ajnyana and The story of Bujangga Manik: A pilgrim's progress were undiscovered before this book. The first two were found in a nineteenth-century manuscript collection of the former Batavian Society and are now in the National Library of Indonesia in Jakarta, while the third was donated to the Bodleian Library in Oxford as early as 1627, though it was not identified as an Old Sundanese poem until the 1950s.

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William Collins

This study presents the text and translation of an oral epic, or guritan, relating the exploits of Radin Suane, which was recorded during anthropological fieldwork among the Besemah, in the remote highlands of South Sumatra. Documentation of an epic in Besemah, a little known Sumatran-Malay language, will be useful for comparative purposes to specialists in Malaysian and Indonesian languages and literatures. This work is also intended to serve students of ethnography, folklore and oral poetry, as well as general readers who may not be familiar with Sumatran culture. Accordingly, an extensive commentary has been provided to give a cultural context for understanding this epic.

The Battle for Junk Ceylon

The Syair Sultan Maulana

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C. Skinner

The Battle for Junk Ceylon presents a new scholarly edition of the text of the Malay “ballad” known as the Syair Sultan Maulana, together with an English translation. This long poem was written during the second decade of the 19th century by the secretary to the Lakasamana (Admiral) of the sultanate of Kedah. It gives an eye-witness account if the events which occurred during the early part of the reign of Sultan Ahmad Tajuddin, in particular the part played by the Kedah fleet in helping the Siamese to expel the Burmese form the island of Phuket (“Junk Ceylon”) on the west coast of southern Thailand.
The accuracy and relative lack of bias on the part of the author make this Malay text a primary source of some importance, and accordingly the editor has concentrated his attention on the historical features of the text, in particular the military and naval aspects of the Junk Ceylon campaign, thereby also making use of sources in Thai in order to paint a remarkably clear picture of the course of the events.

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S.O. Robson

This edition of the Classical Malay prose work, the Hikajat Andakén Penurat includes an English translation and an Introduction explaining the place of the work in Malay literature. The Hikajat Andakén Penurat tells the story of the prince Raden Andakén Penurat and his beloved, Kèn Tambuhan. It is closely related to the Shair Kèn Tambuhan, a poem that has appeared in several editions. The story is relatively short and well written; it is representative of its genre. The book is especially intended for readers who have little or no knowledge of Malay.

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J.J. Ras

Text and translation of a hitherto unpublished chronicle of the most important Malay colony in Borneo. Hikayat Bandjar is a highly valuable body of material for the study of Indonesian cultural history. The author gives a textual and philological analysis of its contents. In the introduction he discusses earlier publications on the Hikajat Bandjar, the condition of the manuscripts, the language in which the text is written, and the (scholarly) appreciation expressed for Malay chronicles in the past. In the following chapter Ras gives summaries and comparisons of recensions I and II of the Hikajat Bandjar, and looks at parallels with other Malay and Javanese stories. He also discusses the Malay colony in Southeast Borneo and its contacts with Java.