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Edited by Falko Daim

This compendium examines the history and culture of the Byzantine world from the foundation of Constantinople (324) to the Ottoman conquest of the city, which brought the final downfall of the Byzantine Empire (1453). A detailed 100-page introduction is followed by discussion of 15 key topics, including politics and government, people and society, legislation and legal practice, the army and navy, church and religion, nature and the environment, art and architecture, languages, literature, education and culture, medicine and music. Because the work forms part of Brill's New Pauly, particular attention is paid to aspects of continuity with the ancient world, and of innovation.

Edited by James H. Brusuelas, Dirk Obbink and Stefan Schorn

This volume is part of the continuation of Felix Jacoby’s monumental collection of fragmentary Greek historiography. It contains new critical editions of the anonymous Greek papyri with biographical content with English translation and extensive commentaries. The papyri concern the lives of politicians, rhetoricians, kings, poets and philosophers. These texts show that there was a wider variety of forms of biographical writing in Greek antiquity than is attested by the preserved works and they contribute significantly to our knowledge of the development of this literary genre. The commentaries provide many new insights into the development of biographical traditions in antiquity.

Edited by Anne-Marie Wittke

Ranging in time from the end of the Bronze Age to the dawn of the so-called historical period (12th-6th centuries BC), this compendium presents the first complete survey of the early history of all the cultures along the coasts of the Mediterranean. In addition to the Phoenicians, Greeks and Etruscans, these also include many other peoples, such as the Iberians, Ligurians, Thracians, Phrygians, Luwians, Aramaeans and Libyans. The volume brings together the knowledge gained from material, textual and pictorial sources in all disciplines working in this field, including Near Eastern, Phoenician, Carthaginian and biblical archaeology, Aegean and North African studies, Villanovan studies and Etruscology, Iberology, early Greek historiography and Dark Ages studies. As a whole, this period was characterized by the intermingling of cultures around the Mediterranean Rim, and the main focus of content is therefore on contacts, the transfer of culture and knowledge and key common themes, such as mobility, religion, resources, languages and writing. With indices and numerous tables and maps of Pauly quality.
This English version has been edited by John Noel Dillon and translated by Duncan A. Smart

Gertjan Verhasselt

This book is the first volume to appear in print since 1999 in Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker Continued, which continues Felix Jacoby’s monumental but uncompleted collection of fragmentary Greek historiography. It is part of section IV B (History of Literature, Music, Art and Culture) and provides a critical edition, translation and commentary of the fragments of Dikaiarchos, a pupil of Aristotle from late fourth century BCE. Dikaiarchos wrote about cultural history, literature, philosophers, politics, geography, ethics and the soul. The book advances the state of the art by presenting a new text and demarcation of the fragments, a study of the method of the authors citing Dikaiarchos, new readings and interpretations of the fragments and a reassessment of Dikaiarchos’ value as a historian.

Edited by Manfred Landfester

The period of the Renaissance (late 14th to early 17th centuries) saw the most intensive reception of Antiquity in European history. The rediscovery, appropriation and further development of the accomplishments of the ancients had a crucial influence in all spheres of early modern culture. This lexicon of Renaissance Humanism traces these processes from the career of Petrarch to the period of the Reformation and confessionalization, in 130 comprehensive articles covering topics, personalities and places of importance in the history of the Humanist movement.
Translated and edited by Duncan A. Smart and Chad M. Schroeder.

Edited by Peter von Möllendorff, Annette Simonis and Linda Simonis

Alexander the Great, Caesar, Caligula, Cicero, Cleopatra, Diogenes, Hypatia, Leonidas, Lucretia, Nero, Sappho and Socrates—all famous women and men from Antiquity who have fascinated across the centuries that divide us from them. We encounter them again and again in literature, art, music, film and new media forms such as graphic novels.

The 96 contributions in Brill’s New Pauly Supplement 7: Historical Figures from Antiquity written by an international team of scholars depict the survival of these great characters from Antiquity to the modern world. Each article presents an overview of the latest research on what we know concerning the lives of the historical person or legendary figure and then recounts the reception of these figures throughout history, giving special attention on the viewpoints in the early modern and contemporary periods. Turning the spotlight on the leitmotifs of established images and theories allows the reader to reassess the importance of these figures in our history and culture.
Translated and edited by Duncan A. Smart and Chad M. Schroeder

Edited by Franco Montanari, Fausto Montana and Lara Pagani

Grammarians of antiquity taught and practiced philology, text criticism and rhetoric, essential skills in the education, career and public life of ancient Greeks and Romans. Brill’s Lexicon of Greek Grammarians of Antiquity (LGGA) serves as the first point of reference for information on these ancient grammarians for scholars of Greek and Latin antiquity, in particular for research into the history of philology, grammar and ancient scholarship.
Sorted alphabetically by Latin name, each entry consists of 1) an introduction with biographical information on the respective grammarian, as well as a discussion of his work and preserved fragments; 2) the Greek text of these fragments; and finally 3) the relevant bibliography, including lists of editions (if any) and studies. A total of more than 570 grammarians have been identified for inclusion in the LGGA and over 300 are currently available online. Each entry will be published in Italian and English. Completion of the Lexicon is expected at the end of 2023.

Edited by Philip Ford, Jan Bloemendal and Charles E. Fantazzi

CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2014
Library Journal Best Print Reference Selection 2014

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and broad cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this 800,000 word two-volume work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences. An invaluable resource for both the advanced scholar and the graduate student.

The Encyclopaedia is also available ONLINE.

Contributors are: Monica Azzolini, Irena Backus, Jon Balserak, Ann Blair, Jan Bloemendal, David Butterfield, Isabelle Charmantier, John Considine, Alejandro Coroleu, Ricardo da Cunha Lima, Susanna de Beer, Erik De Bom, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Tom Deneire, Ingrid De Smet, Karl Enenkel, Charles Fantazzi, Mathieu Ferrand, Roger Fisher, Philip Ford, Raphaele Garrod, Guido Giglioni, Roger Green, Yasmin Haskell, Hans Helander, Lex Hermans, Louise Hill Curth, Leofranc Holford-Strevens, Brenda Hosington, Erika Jurikova, Craig Kallendorf, Jill Kraye, Andrew Laird, Han Lamers, Marc Laureys, Jeltine Ledegang-Keegstra, Jan Machielsen, Peter Mack, David Marsh, Dustin Mengelkoch, Milena Minkova, David Money, Jennifer Morrish Tunberg, Adam Mosley, Ann Moss, Monique Mund-Dopchie, Colette Nativel, Lodi Nauta, Henk Nellen, Gideon Nisbet, Richard Oosterhoff, Marianne Pade, Jan Papy, David Porter, Johann Ramminger, Jennifer Rampling, Rudolf Rasch, Karen Reeds, Valery Rees, Bettina Reitz-Joosse, Stella Revard, Dirk Sacré, Gerald Sandy, Minna Skafte Jensen, Carl Springer, Gorana Stepanić, Harry Stevenson, Jane Stevenson, Andrew Taylor, Nikolaus Thurn, Johannes Trapman, Terence Tunberg, Piotr Urbański, Wiep van Bunge, Harm-Jan van Dam, Demmy Verbeke, Zweder von Martels, Maia Wellington Gahtan, and Paul White.
The Encyclopedia of Ancient Greek Language and Linguistics (EAGLL) is a unique work that brings together the latest research from across a range of disciplines which contribute to our knowledge of Ancient Greek. It is an indispensable research tool for scholars and students of Greek, of linguistics, and of other Indo-European languages, as well as of Biblical literature. The EAGLL offers a systematic and comprehensive treatment of all aspects of the history and study of Ancient Greek, comprising detailed descriptions of the language from Proto-Greek to koine. It addresses linguistic aspects from several perspectives including history, structure, individual singularities, biographical references, schools of thought, technical meta-language, sociolinguistic issues, dialects, didactics, translation practices, generic issues, Greek in relation to other languages, etc., and on all levels of analysis including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon, semantics, stylistics, etc. It also includes all the necessary background information regarding the roots of Greek in Indo-European. As and when, excursions may be made to later stages of the language, e.g. Byzantine or even later. The focus, however, will predominantly be Ancient Greek. With well over 500 entries on all aspects of Ancient Greek, this new encyclopedia aspires to become a basic research tool and the recognized reference work on the subject. The online version of the EAGLL can be accessed at http://referenceworks.brillonline.com/.
Features & Benefits
--Full Text Search, advanced search options --Extensive cross-references, navigation via hyperlinks --Articles covering a wide-range of topics such as the Greek of various sources (texts, manuscripts, inscriptions, reading traditions), major grammatical features (phonology, morphology, and syntax), lexicon, script and paleography, theoretical linguistic approaches, etc. --All Greek transcribed

Edited by Manfred Landfester

The Classical Tradition volumes of Brill’s New Pauly: Encyclopedia of the Ancient World form a specific part within the Encyclopedia as a whole. The longer entries that deal with the reception of the classical world in later centuries contain a wealth of information. This Index volume is specifically designed to make this information even more accessible. It contains a thematic guide to the entries but also provide extensive indices of Personal Names, Place Names and Subjects discussed within the texts, making the it an indispensable tool for the optimal use of this unique series.