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Editor: Stefan Schorn
This volume is part of the continuation of Felix Jacoby’s monumental collection of fragmentary Greek historiography. It contains new editions of the Greek paradoxographers of the Imperial Period and of uncertain date, fragmentary and non-fragmentary alike. It also includes the fragments of the related types of works On Rivers and On Stones. For the first time, all these texts have been provided with a comprehensive commentary. Together with volume IV E 1, this will constitute a new corpus of Greek paradoxography which will make Greek thought on the marvelous accessible to scholars of antiquity and later times.
The Kitāb al-Ṭabaqāt al-Kabīr ( Biography of Muḥammad, His Companions and the Successors up to the Year 230 of the Hijra) by Ibn Saʿd (d. 230 A.H./845 C.E.) is the earliest extant biographical dictionary on the life of the Prophet and the early generations of Muslims. It is one of the most important historical works about the first centuries of Muslim society in Arabic. This classic Brill edition was supervised by Eduard Sachau and was originally titled Biographien Muhammeds, seiner Gefährten und der späteren Träger des Islams bis zum Jahre 230 der Flucht. This edition was originally published between 1904 and 1940.

Contributing editors
Carl Brockelmann, Josef Horovitz, Julius Lippert, Bruno Meissner, Eugen Mittwoch, Friedrich Schwally, Karl Vilhelm Zetterstéen.
Author: Pietro Zaccaria
As part of the continuation of Felix Jacoby’s monumental collection of fragmentary Greek historiography, this volume, by Pietro Zaccaria, contains new editions of the Hellenistic biographers of the first century BC and the Hellenistic biographers of uncertain date. More than one hundred fragments from biographies of philosophers, statesmen, and orators, penned by eleven Greek biographers, are critically edited, translated into English, and provided with comprehensive commentary. For each biographer, an introduction discusses the author’s dates, life, and works. By offering the first complete corpus of late Hellenistic biography preserved in fragments, this volume contributes to our knowledge and understanding of Hellenistic historiography and of ancient biography as a whole.
This volume explores engagement with Greco-Roman Antiquity across Europe and beyond in the 18th century. Approximately 100 experts, in some 140 articles from “Academy” to “Wallpaper”, show how Classical and rival antiquities were perceived and studied during the age of Enlightenment, revolution and scientific progress, and how they served the formulation and affirmation of new ideals. The survey covers the period between the outbreak of the Querelle des Anciens et des Modernes in France in 1687 and the reorganization of Europe at the Congress of Vienna in 1815.

Articles examine the spheres of society within which engagement with Antiquity took place in the 18th century, the specific subject areas in which it took place, and the media by which it was propagated. Reception of Antiquity in the 18th century was by no means limited to theoretical discourses. On the contrary, the period’s growing interest in sensuality and experience also required the relics of Antiquity and their modern echoes and evocations to be explored with all the senses. Focus therefore widened beyond the canonical bounds of reception in the spheres of culture, education, philosophy, religion, law and economics to encompass the perception of Antiquity in everyday and popular culture.
Editor: Falko Daim
This compendium examines the history and culture of the Byzantine world from the foundation of Constantinople (324) to the Ottoman conquest of the city, which brought the final downfall of the Byzantine Empire (1453). A detailed 100-page introduction is followed by discussion of 15 key topics, including politics and government, people and society, legislation and legal practice, the army and navy, church and religion, nature and the environment, art and architecture, languages, literature, education and culture, medicine and music. Because the work forms part of Brill's New Pauly, particular attention is paid to aspects of continuity with the ancient world, and of innovation.
Antidorus, Dionysius Iambus, Epigenes, Lysanias, Parmenon, Silenus, Simaristus, Simmias
SGG 1 offers the first critical edition of, and commentaries on, the textual fragments of the ancient Greek grammarians Antidorus, Dionysius Iambus, Epigenes, Lysanias, Parmenon, Silenus, Simaristus, and Sim(m)ias. All of these personalities belong, or so plausibly appear, to the early Hellenistic period (3rd-2nd centuries BC) and share a special interest in glossographical issues (mainly discussions of problems concerning lexical usages and customs, in Greek literature as well as in ordinary life of their times) and/or in literary history. Each entry includes: a biographical and cultural profile of the grammarian; the text of testimonies and fragments critically edited, translated, and analytically commented on; a thorough bibliography; and indices. Translation, critical apparatus, and commentary are in Italian.
This volume is part of the continuation of Felix Jacoby’s monumental collection of fragmentary Greek historiography. It contains new critical editions of the anonymous Greek papyri with biographical content with English translation and extensive commentaries. The papyri concern the lives of politicians, rhetoricians, kings, poets and philosophers. These texts show that there was a wider variety of forms of biographical writing in Greek antiquity than is attested by the preserved works and they contribute significantly to our knowledge of the development of this literary genre. The commentaries provide many new insights into the development of biographical traditions in antiquity.
This book is the first volume to appear in print since 1999 in Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker Continued, which continues Felix Jacoby’s monumental but uncompleted collection of fragmentary Greek historiography. It is part of section IV B (History of Literature, Music, Art and Culture) and provides a critical edition, translation and commentary of the fragments of Dikaiarchos, a pupil of Aristotle from late fourth century BCE. Dikaiarchos wrote about cultural history, literature, philosophers, politics, geography, ethics and the soul. The book advances the state of the art by presenting a new text and demarcation of the fragments, a study of the method of the authors citing Dikaiarchos, new readings and interpretations of the fragments and a reassessment of Dikaiarchos’ value as a historian.
Ranging in time from the end of the Bronze Age to the dawn of the so-called historical period (12th-6th centuries BC), this compendium presents the first complete survey of the early history of all the cultures along the coasts of the Mediterranean. In addition to the Phoenicians, Greeks and Etruscans, these also include many other peoples, such as the Iberians, Ligurians, Thracians, Phrygians, Luwians, Aramaeans and Libyans. The volume brings together the knowledge gained from material, textual and pictorial sources in all disciplines working in this field, including Near Eastern, Phoenician, Carthaginian and biblical archaeology, Aegean and North African studies, Villanovan studies and Etruscology, Iberology, early Greek historiography and Dark Ages studies. As a whole, this period was characterized by the intermingling of cultures around the Mediterranean Rim, and the main focus of content is therefore on contacts, the transfer of culture and knowledge and key common themes, such as mobility, religion, resources, languages and writing. With indices and numerous tables and maps of Pauly quality.
This English version has been edited by John Noel Dillon and translated by Duncan A. Smart
The period of the Renaissance (late 14th to early 17th centuries) saw the most intensive reception of Antiquity in European history. The rediscovery, appropriation and further development of the accomplishments of the ancients had a crucial influence in all spheres of early modern culture. This lexicon of Renaissance Humanism traces these processes from the career of Petrarch to the period of the Reformation and confessionalization, in 130 comprehensive articles covering topics, personalities and places of importance in the history of the Humanist movement.
Translated and edited by Duncan A. Smart and Chad M. Schroeder