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Jesuit Historiography Online (JHO) is an Open Access resource offering over seventy historiographical essays written by experts. Aimed at scholars of Jesuit history as well as the many disciplines with which it intersects, each essay in JHO provides a summary of key texts from the earlier literature, a painstaking survey of more recent work, and a digest of archival and online resources. Crucially, each essay covers both Anglophone and non-Anglophone works and devotes attention to scholarship from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas, making this survey truly global in scope. The essays represent much more than a bibliographical check-list; authors explore trends in Jesuit historiography and provide a nuanced, systematic, and in-depth analysis of what has been written—when, why, and by whom—about arguably the most significant religious order within the Roman Catholic tradition.

JHO is available in Open Access thanks to generous support of the Institute for Advanced Jesuit Studies at Boston College.

Edited by Einar Thomassen

The Coptic Gnostic Library is the only authoritative edition of many of the Coptic writings of the Gnostics from the first centuries AD. It was originally published by Brill in fourteen hardback volumes as part of the Nag Hammadi (and Manichaean) Studies series between 1975 and 1995, under the general editorship of James M. Robinson.

The Coptic Gnostic Library contains all the texts of the Nag Hammadi codices, both in the original Coptic and in translation. Each text has its own introduction, and full indexes are provided. The Coptic Gnostic Library is the starting point for all research into ancient Gnosticism. It is the result of decades of dedicated research by the most distinguished international scholars in this field.

The Coptic Gnostic Library continues where the Dead Sea Scrolls left off. Our main sources of information for the Gnostic religion are the so-called Nag Hammadi codices, written in Coptic. These were unearthed in 1945 near the town of Nag Hammadi in Upper Egypt. The texts literally begin where the Dead Sea Scrolls end. Their discovery is considered equally significant as the Dead Sea Scrolls themselves, bringing to light a long-hidden wealth of information and insights into early Judaism and the roots of Christianity. Furthermore, these writings clearly show that the Gnostic religion was not only a force that interacted with early Christianity and Judaism in their formative periods, but also a significant religious movement in its own right.

Features and Benefits
- Online edition of the original 14 hardback Nag Hammadi Codices
- Complete and unabridged
- Facing Coptic texts and English translations, Introductions, Notes, and Indexes
- Instant and fully searchable access to the equivalent of more than 5,000 pages of print.