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Odyssea Homeri a Francisco Griffolino Aretino in Latinum translata

Die lateinische Odyssee-Übersetzung des Francesco Griffolini

Series:

Bernd Schneider and Christina Meckelnborg

In about the year 1462 Francesco Griffolini of Arezzo translated the Odyssey of Homer into Latin at the behest of Pope Pius II. In contrast to the most important of his predecessors in the field of Homer translation, Leontius Pilatus, who was still completely committed to the medieval method of literal translation, Griffolini made use of the skills acquired from the masters of humanist Latin and created a prose text which also appealed to classical criteria. This volume offers a critical text of this Odyssey translation edited on the basis of the manuscripts. The extensive introduction provides information about the life and work of Francesco Griffolini, examines his method of translation and clarifies the manuscript transmission of the text. The edition represents a contribution to the history of Homer translation in the Italian renaissance and forms an important basis for further study of the reception of Homer in humanism.

John Stewart of Baldynneis Roland Furious

A Scots Poem in its European Context

Series:

Donna Heddle

The poetry of John Stewart of Baldynneis, one of James VI's soi disant Castalian Band, is a relatively unknown phenomenon of the Renaissance period. This book is a critical edition of his epic poem Roland Furious, supposedly a translation of Ludovico Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso into Scots but actually a brilliantly original poem which directly follows guidelines given by James VI for the creation of such literature in the Scottish vernacular. A fully annotated version of the text is given, along with a critical induction discussing the main European influences on Stewart's work, notes to the text, an appendix of proper and personal names, and a full glossary. This book provides an important link in the history of Scottish poetry.

Brill's Texts and Sources in Intellectual History, vol. 4