Editorial-board Peter Bisschop, Dominic Goodall, Harunaga Isaacson and G.J. Meulenbeld

The Supplement to the Groningen Oriental Studies publishes the critical edition and study of the Skandapurāṇa. The series is published under the auspices of the J. Gonda Foundation (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences).

The series published three volumes over the last 5 years.

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William Collins

This study presents the text and translation of an oral epic, or guritan, relating the exploits of Radin Suane, which was recorded during anthropological fieldwork among the Besemah, in the remote highlands of South Sumatra. Documentation of an epic in Besemah, a little known Sumatran-Malay language, will be useful for comparative purposes to specialists in Malaysian and Indonesian languages and literatures. This work is also intended to serve students of ethnography, folklore and oral poetry, as well as general readers who may not be familiar with Sumatran culture. Accordingly, an extensive commentary has been provided to give a cultural context for understanding this epic.

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S.O. Robson

This edition of the Classical Malay prose work, the Hikajat Andakén Penurat includes an English translation and an Introduction explaining the place of the work in Malay literature. The Hikajat Andakén Penurat tells the story of the prince Raden Andakén Penurat and his beloved, Kèn Tambuhan. It is closely related to the Shair Kèn Tambuhan, a poem that has appeared in several editions. The story is relatively short and well written; it is representative of its genre. The book is especially intended for readers who have little or no knowledge of Malay.

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J.J. Ras

Text and translation of a hitherto unpublished chronicle of the most important Malay colony in Borneo. Hikayat Bandjar is a highly valuable body of material for the study of Indonesian cultural history. The author gives a textual and philological analysis of its contents. In the introduction he discusses earlier publications on the Hikajat Bandjar, the condition of the manuscripts, the language in which the text is written, and the (scholarly) appreciation expressed for Malay chronicles in the past. In the following chapter Ras gives summaries and comparisons of recensions I and II of the Hikajat Bandjar, and looks at parallels with other Malay and Javanese stories. He also discusses the Malay colony in Southeast Borneo and its contacts with Java.

The History (Taʾrikh) by Ibn Wāḍiḥ al-Yaʿqūbī (2 vols.)

Ibn Wāḍiḥ Qui Dicitur al-Yaʿqūbī, Historiae in Two Volumes

M.Th. Houtsma

Abū al-ʿAbbās al-Yaʿqūbī was a Muslim imperial official and polymath of the third/ninth century. On the occasion of the publication of The Works of Ibn Wāḍiḥ al-Yaʿqūbī. An English translation, edited by Matthew S. Gordon, Chase F. Robinson, Everett K. Rowson, and Michael Fishbein (Leiden, 2017-2018), Brill is making the classic Arabic edition of al-Yaʿqūbī’s Taʾrīkh by M.Th. Houtsma (2 vols., 1883) available in paperback for the first time.

The Rāsa Māna ke Pada of Kevalarāma

A Medieval Hindi Text of the Eighth Gaddī of the Vallabha Sect

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Alan W. Entwistle

This book of the well-known Braj specialist, Prof Dr A.W. Entwistle (University of Washington), focuses on the medieval tradition of the eighth branch of the Vallabha sect.

The lengthy introduction deals with the sectarian background of the branch, including a survey of the relevant tradition and history of medieval Vaiṣṇava devotion as a whole and the Vallabha sect in particular. It discusses the structure of the Puṣṭimārga and its gaddīs, or branches, since Rāsa Māna ke Pada is part of the literary heritage of the sect’s Eighth Gaddī which, until partition in 1947, was based at Dera Ghazi Khan (now in Pakistan). It gives a , survey of the life and works of the founders of this gaddī, ŚrI Lālajī, and of his grandson Kevalarāma.

Due attention is also paid to the language of the text and in an appendix a comparative etymological glossary is given that cites examples from other Braj Bhāṣā authors in order to support interpretations of the more obscure words and idioms.

The main part of the book consists of a critical edition of the Rāsa Māna ke Pada, a collection of poems attributed to Kevalarāma, and an annotated translation into English.

Kauṣītaki Upaniṣad

Translation and Commentary with an Appendix Sāńkhāyana Āraņyaka IX-XI

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H.W. Bodewitz

This volume provides a translation of and commentary on the Kauṣītaki Upaniṣad. An appendix on Sankhayana Aranyatat is included, in addition to an appendix on the term prajñātman.

Arjunawiwāha

The Marriage of Arjuna of Mpu Kanwa

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Stuart Robson

The Arjunawiwāha is one of the best known of the Old Javanese classics. This volume presents a new text, based on Balinese manuscripts, with a complete translation, building on the work done by earlier writers. An introduction provides ample background information, as well as an original interpretation of the significance of the text, within its historical and cultural setting. This poem was written by Mpu Kanwa in around A.D. 1030 under King Airlangga, who ruled in East Java. It is Mpu Kanwa’s only known work, and is the second oldest example in the genre of kakawin. The poem is a narrative, but also contains passages of description, philosophical or religious teaching of great interest, as well as remarkable erotic scenes. Parts of the tale have been depicted on early temple reliefs and in paintings, and the text is still recited in Bali by literary clubs and in temple ceremonies.
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A Chain of Kings

The Makassarese Chronicles of Gowa and Talloq

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William P. Cummings

The chronicles of Gowa and Talloq are the most important historical sources for the study of pre-colonial Makassar. They have provided the basic framework and much of the information that we possess about the origins, growth, and expansion of Gowa during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. During this period Gowa and its close ally Talloq became the most powerful force in the eastern Indonesian archipelago, and historians have relied heavily on the chronicles to chart the developments of this period. Available for the first time in English translation, the two texts will offer historians and other scholars an invaluable foundation on which to base interpretations of this crucial place and time in Indonesian history. This volume is required reading for scholars of pre-modern Southeast Asia, including historians, linguists, anthropologists, and others.
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Edited by William Cummings

Beginning in the 1630s, a series of annalists at the main courts of Makassar began keeping records with dated entries that recorded a wide variety of specific historical information about a wide variety of topics, including the births and deaths of notable individuals, the actions of rulers, the spread of Islam, trade and diplomacy, the built environment, ritual activity, warfare, internal political struggles, social and kinship relations, eclipses and comets, and more. These Lontaraq bilang were a clear departure in form and function from the genealogically-structured chronicles being composed about the ruling families of Gowa and Talloq in the same era. By the end of 1751, nearly 2400 entries had been completed.
These records are a rich lode of information for scholars interested in virtually any aspect of life in premodern Makassar, and are a rare and precious resource for scholars of Southeast Asia. This is the first English translation and annotation of the annals.
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