Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • Text Edition x
  • Search level: Titles x
  • Status (Books): Not Yet Published x
Clear All
An Edition and Annotated Translation of Mālinīślokavārttika I, 1-399
The first part of the ‘Versified Commentary on the Mālinītantra’ (Mālinīślokvārttika) by the tenth-century theologian Abhinavagupta, which is translated here for the first time, presents a philosophy of Śaiva revelation, conceived of as a descent of the highest non-dual form of knowledge, through the different levels of speech, into the knowledge embodied in the canon of Tantras or Agamas on which the Śaiva religion is based. The aim of the text is to demonstrate the logic behind the claim of the monistic Tantric schools on which Abhinavagupta bases his philosophy.

The present volume deals in its introduction with the scriptural background of the Śaiva religion because that is a prerequisite for understanding many of the arguments in the text. The translation is accompanied by a re-edition of the Sanskrit text with the help of two manuscripts not consulted before, and a running commentary. A fragment of the Śrīkaṇṭī, which is probably the source for some of Abhinavaguptas theories of the Śaiva canon, is transcribed in an appendix.

Volume Editor: Riccardo Vecchiato
Der zweite Band hat das Archiv eines Beamten namens Sarapion zum Inhalt, der am Anfang des 2. Jhs. v.Chr. verschiedene Posten in der Getreide- und Finanzverwaltung bekleidete. Besonders beachtlich ist, dass die Texte aus dem memphitischen Gau stammen, aus einer Region, aus der wir nur wenige weitere Papyrustexte besitzen.
Volume Editor: Riccardo Vecchiato
In den vorliegenden Bänden werden Papyri aus den unpublizierten Beständen der Kölner Papyrussammlung ediert: Ein außergewöhnliches Lexikon poetischer und dialektaler Wörter aus dem 3./2. Jh. v.Chr. und dokumentarische Papyri, die aus den ersten Jahrzenten des 2. Jhs. v.Chr. stammen. Der erste Band umfasst die kommentierte Edition von sieben Papyrusfragmenten eines frühhellenistischen Lexikons. Das wohl interessanteste formale Charakteristikum dieses Textes ist die vollständige alphabetische Anordnung der Lemmata, die sich sonst nur in nachchristlicher Zeit belegen lässt. Zu den wesentlichen inhaltlichen Merkmalen des Textes gehört einerseits der Einsatz der Dialektalforschung zur Erklärung literarischer Wörter, andererseits das Interesse für dichterische Vokabeln, vor allem homerische, aber auch aus der Tragödie und der Lyrik.
Flugschriften von Autorinnen der Reformation in heutigem Deutsch
An der Reformation waren auch Frauen beteiligt! Mit engagierten und provozierenden Publikationen traten sie an die Seite Luthers und Melanchthons.
Die Frauen der Reformation erfreuen sich seit vielen Jahren großen Interesses, allen voran die Autorinnen reformatorischer Flugschriften wie Argula von Grumbach und Katharina Zell, um nur die beiden bekanntesten zu nennen. Ihre Publikationen stehen gleichwohl bislang nur in den sehr schwer zugänglichen Originaltexten zur Verfügung, die nur für Spezialisten geeignet sind. Erstmals bietet dieses Buch eine Auswahl der wichtigsten und interessantesten Texte ungekürzt in heutigem Deutsch. Was es von Luther und Melanchthon, von Zwingli und Calvin schon lange gibt, gibt es nun also auch für die Reformationsfrauen: ihre religiösen, theologischen, gesellschaftlichen und politischen Gedanken und Ideen in einer für jede:n lesbaren und für jede:n verständlichen sprachlichen Form.
This volume contains twenty-three texts, most of which were written between the end of the 2nd/8th century and the end of the 3rd/9th century. The majority of them reflect the early stages of the development of the First Ibadi Imamate in 132/750 – established when the Omanis fully seceded from the central state in Baghdad until the Imamate was collapsed by the Abbasids in 280/893. The source value of these Ibadi texts for researchers and scholars specialised in Islamic studies far outweighs any importance they might attach to sectarian history per se.
Editors: Gerrit Bos and Fabian Käs
Translator: Michael R. McVaugh
The medical compendium entitled Zād al-musāfir wa-qūt al-ḥāḍir ( Provisions for the Traveller and Nourishment for the Sedentary) and compiled by Ibn al-Jazzār from Qayrawān in the tenth century is one of the most influential handbooks in the history of western medicine. In the eleventh century, Constantine the African translated it into Latin; this translation was the basis for several commentaries compiled from the twelfth century on. The text was also translated into Byzantine Greek and three times into medieval Hebrew. The present volume includes a new critical edition of the Arabic text of books I and II, along with an annotated English translation, as well as critical editions of Constantine’s Viaticum and the Hebrew versions by Ibn Tibbon, Abraham ben Isaac, and Do’eg ha-Edomi.
Editor: R.M. Dumas
Around a century ago a Malay poem which tells of a foreigner, always indicated as Sinyor, in Southeast Asia who elopes with Lela Mayang, the wife of a wealthy Chinaman. The latter sets out in pursuit of the couple and engages in a naval battle with the Sinyor in an attempt to get his wife back. The Syair Sinyor Kosta, as the poem is known, presents us with fascinating pictures and glimpses of Malay society, in this case a nineteenth-century society in transition. It reflects changing literary tastes, a pluriform society and the beginning modernization of Malay culture. In its variegated transmission, through both manuscripts and early printings, it is an illustration of the continuous interaction between Malay authors and audiences. In particular it is a remarkable piece of early evidence of literary coexistence between Malays and Chinese, who must have enjoyed this story of the merry Sinyor each in their own way, as is apparent from the continuing process of creation, reception and recreation of the text.
This book presents editions of four versions of the Syair Sinyor Kosta, of which two are translated into English. The texts are preceded by a lengthy introduction which deals with the manuscripts, their history and provenance, and their writers. The book closes with a detailed chapter with a comparative study of the four versions, an investigation of the historical setting, and an analysis of the language used in the texts.
Translator: Ovamir Anjum
This is an unabridged, annotated, translation of the great Damascene savant and saint Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya’s (d. 751/1350) Madārij al-Sālikīn. Conceived as a critical commentary on an earlier Sufi classic by the great Hanbalite scholar Abū Ismāʿīl of Herat, Madārij aims to rejuvenate Sufism’s Qurʾanic foundations. The original work was a key text for the Sufi initiates, composed in terse, rhyming prose as a master’s instruction to the aspiring seeker on the path to God, in a journey of a hundred stations whose ultimate purpose was to be lost to one’s self ( fanāʾ) and subsist ( baqāʾ) in God. The translator, Ovamir (ʿUwaymir) Anjum, provides an extensive introduction and annotation to this English-Arabic face-to-face presentation of this masterpiece of Islamic psychology.
Translator: Ovamir Anjum
This is an unabridged, annotated, translation of the great Damascene savant and saint Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya’s (d. 751/1350) Madārij al-Sālikīn. Conceived as a critical commentary on an earlier Sufi classic by the great Hanbalite scholar Abū Ismāʿīl of Herat, Madārij aims to rejuvenate Sufism’s Qurʾanic foundations. The original work was a key text for the Sufi initiates, composed in terse, rhyming prose as a master’s instruction to the aspiring seeker on the path to God, in a journey of a hundred stations whose ultimate purpose was to be lost to one’s self ( fanāʾ) and subsist ( baqāʾ) in God. The translator, Ovamir (ʿUwaymir) Anjum, provides an extensive introduction and annotation to this English-Arabic face-to-face presentation of this masterpiece of Islamic psychology.
A Mongolian Epic Chronicle of the Thirteenth Century
The 13th century Secret History of the Mongols, covering the great Činggis Qan’s (1162-1227) ancestry and life, stands out as a literary monument of first magnitude. Written partly in prose and partly in epic poetry, it is the major native source on Činggis Qan, also dealing with part of the reign of his son and successor Ögödei (r. 1229-41).
This true handbook contains an historical introduction, a full translation of the chronicle in accessible English, plus an extensive commentary. Indispensable for the historian, the Sino-Mongolist, the Altaic philologist, and anyone interested in comparative literature and Central Asian folklore.

The Secret History of the Mongols has been selected by Choice as Outstanding Academic Title (2005).