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Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical Texts is now available on our new platform, Scholarly Editions, in a completely new design, and with enhanced search options throughout the entire publication. Brill's Scholarly Editions is designed to provide an uninterrupted reading experience and to display parallel texts side by side. From 1 January 2022 onwards, the parallel run will end and the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical Texts will only be accessible on Brill's Scholarly Editions platform.

The Dead Sea Scrolls represents perhaps the most significant historical manuscript discovery in recent history. Brill’s Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical Texts offers a unique opportunity to study state of the art photographs of these ancient scripts, and understand their meaning using the translations of text and interpretations for missing fragments.

The Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical Texts provides users with a comprehensive tool for the study of the biblical texts from the Judean Desert (the “Dead Sea Scrolls”). For the first time all biblical texts are accessible in one place, allowing searches through high resolution photographs of the ancient fragments, and texts derived from the fragments in Masoretic order (Bible books), as well as providing English translations and full transcriptions of the Hebrew Scripture, over 200 in total.

NEW: The Brill Text Tool, free of charge to Chrome users. The Brill Text Tool is a browser extension to get additional lexical and grammatical information about the Dead Sea Scrolls Biblical Texts Online. Read more here.

The complete collection consists of the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical Texts and the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Non-Biblical Texts. Used side by side, these databases offer the user access to all the Dead Sea Scrolls texts.

This online product is based on The Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library CD-ROM, published by Brill and Brigham Young University, 1999.
Author: Daniel Nodes
The sermons here published for the first time are attributed to an otherwise unknown friar referred to simply as Frater Petrus. The collection provides evidence of actual preaching in a normal setting from fourteenth-century Germany, between the beginnings of the Franciscan order and the Observant reform movement, not by a major light of the order, but a regular member who may have held status as an intermediate-level teacher, to judge by the care with which the manuscripts were prepared. Theologically competent and gracefully presented in the conventional sermon style of the period, the collection, edited and translated by Daniel Nodes, offers scholars and students a reliable new resource in an area of sermon studies that is still in short supply.
The Opus arduum valde is a Latin commentary on the Book of Revelation, written in England by an unknown scholarly author in the years 1389–1390. The book originated from the early Wycliffite movement and reflects its experience of persecution in apocalyptic terms. In England it soon fell into oblivion, but was adopted by radical exponents of the fifteenth-century Bohemian Hussites. In the sixteenth century Luther obtained a copy of the Opus arduum valde which he had printed in Wittenberg with his own preface in 1528. This remarkable document of religious dissent in late medieval Europe, highly regarded in Lollard and Hussite studies, is now for the first time made available in a critical edition.
Gregorii Nysseni Opera Online is now available on our new platform, Scholarly Editions, in a completely new design, and with enhanced search options throughout the entire publication. Brill's Scholarly Editions is designed to provide an uninterrupted reading experience and to display parallel texts side by side. From 1 January 2022 onwards, the parallel run will end and Gregorii Nysseni Opera Online will only be accessible on Brill's Scholarly Editions platform.

Gregorii Nysseni Opera Online is the ultimate online critical text edition of Gregory of Nyssa's works based on all available known manuscripts, introduced with a complete discussion of the textual transmission and accompanied by extensive annotations on the biblical, classical and patristic sources, and indices.

Summarized:
- 60 texts originating from 17 hardback volumes
- Text 20 (IV 2) De hominis opificio in the next years.
- Complete and unabridged: 17 (and later 18) volumes, totaling over 3000 pages
- Greek texts, prefaces, Conspectus Codicum, Conspectus Siglorum, Prefaces, Texts, including critical apparatus, Appendices and Indices

• Greek corpus of texts of Gregory of Nyssa, a ‘primary source’ now available online
• High quality academic research, quickly and easily accessible for scholars worldwide
• Technologically advanced research tool, created by a publisher with a strong and excellent reputation
The Judaeo-Arabic Translation and Commentary of Saadia Gaon on the Book of Esther
This volume presents a critical edition of the Judaeo-Arabic translation and commentary on the book of Esther by Saadia Gaon (882–942). This edition, accompanied by an introduction and extensively annotated English translation, affords access to the first-known personalized, rationalistic Jewish commentary on this biblical book. Saadia innovatively organizes the biblical narrative—and his commentary thereon—according to seven “guidelines” that provide a practical blueprint by which Israel can live as an abased people under Gentile dominion. Saadia’s prodigious acumen and sense of communal solicitude find vivid expression throughout his commentary in his carefully-defined structural and linguistic analyses, his elucidative references to a broad range of contemporary socio-religious and vocational realia, his anti-Karaite polemics, and his attention to various issues, both psychological and practical, attending Jewish-Gentile conviviality in a 10th-century Islamicate milieu.
Editors: Rifaat Ebied and David Thomas
Acknowledged as a leading medical expert in his day, and secretary to a succession of caliphs in the mid-ninth century, the Nestorian Christian ʿAlī ibn Rabban al-Ṭabarī converted to Islam around the age of 70. He then wrote Radd ʿalā l-Naṣārā, a recantation of his former faith, and Kitāb al-dīn wa-l-dawla, a defence of the Prophet Muḥammad based substantially on biblical proof-texts. The range of arguments he produced against the soundness of his former faith in these two works influenced sections of Islamic scholarship for many centuries.
These new editions and translations of his works are based on all the available evidence for the texts, accompanied by extensive introductions and studies of their place in Islamic thought.



Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Hunt. 268
Translating the Hebrew Bible in Medieval Iberia provides the princeps diplomatic edition and a comprehensive study of Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Hunt. 268. The manuscript, produced in the Iberian Peninsula in the late thirteenth century, features a biblical glossary-commentary in Hebrew that includes 2,018 glosses in the vernacular and 156 in Arabic, and to date is the only manuscript of these characteristics known to have been produced in this region.

Esperanza Alfonso has edited the text and presents here a study of it, examining its pedagogical function, its sources, its exegetical content, and its extraordinary value for the study of biblical translation in the Iberian Peninsula and in the Sephardic Diaspora. Javier del Barco provides a detailed linguistic study and a glossary of the corpus of vernacular glosses.

For a version with a list of corrections and additions, see https://digital.csic.es/handle/10261/265401.
Editor: Jan Bloemendal
In his ‘Project of the New Testament’ Erasmus also wrote a running commentary on all New Testament books, except Revelation, in the form of a paraphrase. In this volume, the Paraphrase on John – Latin text with critical apparatus, and English introduction and commentary, is edited. In the paraphrase, Erasmus turns out to be a mature interpreter of the Bible, who advocated a new Christianity, which he called ‘the philosophy of Christ’, and implicitly criticized the clergy of his own age.