Browse results

A Literary History of Medicine - The ʿUyūn al-anbāʾ fī ṭabaqāt al-aṭibbāʾ of Ibn Abī Uṣaybiʿah Online offers a complete, annotated translation along with a new edition of the celebrated, informative and entertaining history of medicine – the first of its kind – by the Syrian physician Ibn Abī Uṣaybiʿah (d. 1270), together with several introductory essays. A Literary History of Medicine is the earliest comprehensive history of medicine. It contains biographies of over 432 physicians, ranging from the ancient Greeks to the author’s contemporaries, describing their training and practice, often as court physicians, and listing their medical works; all this interlaced with poems and anecdotes. The reader will find in this work an Islamic society that worked closely with Christians and Jews, deeply committed to advancing knowledge and applying it to health and wellbeing.

Generously funded by the Wellcome Trust, this is an open access title distributed under the terms of the CC-BY-NC 4.0 License, which permits any non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

This work is also available as a print set (hardback, 5 volumes).
An Edition of the Reconstructed Text of the Placita with a Commentary and a Collection of Related Texts
Editors: Jaap Mansfeld and David Runia
A new reconstruction and text of the Placita of Aëtius (ca. 50 CE), accompanied by a full commentary and an extensive collection of related texts. This compendium, arguably the most important doxographical text to survive from antiquity, is known through the intensive use made of it by authors in later antiquity and beyond. Covering the entire field of natural philosophy, it has long been mined as a source of information about ancient philosophers and their views. It now receives a thorough analysis as a remarkable work in its own right. This volume is the culmination of a five-volume set of studies on Aëtius (1996–2020): Aëtiana I (ISBN: 9789004105805, 1996), II (Parts 1&2; set ISBN 9789004172067; 2008), III (ISBN 9789004180413; 2009), IV (ISBN: 9789004361454, 2018), and V (Parts 1-4). It uses an innovative methodology to replace the seminal edition of Hermann Diels (1879).
Philological and Historical Commentary to Ammianus Marcellinus' Res Gestae
Ammianus Marcellinus Online is the digital version of the standard and the only complete commentary on Ammianus’ Res Gestae, by J. den Boeft, D. den Hengst, H.C. Teitler and J.W. Drijvers (books 20-31), and P. de Jonge (books 14-19). Their philological and historical commentary has received much praise in the international scholarly world, and has been completed in 2018.
Ammianus Marcellinus Online includes the commentaries to books 14-31 of Res Gestae as well as two full text editions in Latin on which the commentaries are based (Clark, 1910 and Seyfarth, 1978).
Ammianus Marcellinus (4th century CE) was a Roman soldier, historian and author of Res Gestae, a major historical work on the history of Rome from the period of Emperor Nerva (96 CE) to the death of Emperor Valens (378 CE). Res Gestae originally consisted of thirty-one books, although the first thirteen books have been lost. The surviving eighteen books (books 14-31) cover the period from 353 to 378. The work is of great importance to scholars in Roman history, Latin philology, military history and historiography in general.

Features and benefits
  • The only complete historical and philological commentary on Ammianus
  • Access to all available commentaries (books 14-31)
  • Includes two complete text editions (Clark, 1910 and Seyfarth, 1978)
  • Runs on new and bespoke platform for text editions: Brill Scholarly Editions
  • Full-text searchable
  • Languages: Latin, Greek, German, English


  • Review
    "A monumental work of scholarship that no historian of the late fourth century can afford to ignore. [...] One could hardly expect more of any commentary."
    - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2018.09.50
This online publication offers the text of Apuleius' Metamorphoses, along with the acclaimed Groningen Commentary Series to this text, and an English translation. Additionally, the texts of Pro se de Magia and Florida are included as well as commentaries for both works by Vincent Hunink.
Apuleius of Madauros wrote his eleven books of the Metamorphoses (or The Golden Ass) in the late second century CE. It is the first fully extant specimen of an extended Latin work of prose fiction. It is written in a Latin which on the one hand shows elements of the everyday speech and of the colloquial language of the period, but on the other hand incorporates these elements in a sophisticated prose which bears the more general characteristics of an archaizing, artificial language. For the study of Latin prose art as well as of the development of everyday or colloquial Latin this work is an important monument, representative of the Latin prose art of the period. Apart from a purely philological and linguistic point of view, this text is equally important for the study of the development of Latin and European literature. Virtually lost during the Early Middle Ages, the Metamorphoses came to be known and imitated from the fourteenth century onwards, and has undoubtedly played an important role during the emergence of the novelistic literature of Western Europe.
The acclaimed Groningen commentary to the Metamorphoses was published as a multi-volume book series between 1977 and 2015 by the Groningen Commentaries on Apuleius group. It includes the text itself, a commentary and a translation. The complete series is now available online for the first time.
A commentary on Book III of the Metamorphoses is still missing from the online edition. Dr Leonardo Costantini is currently working on completing the work (forthcoming, 2022). In print, the Groningen commentary is also available as a set in the series Apuleius Madaurensis.
The short Latin treatise De curis puerorum is the translation of a lost Arabic original attributed (perhaps mistakenly) to the famous al-Rāzī (Rhazes); one of the rare texts on pediatrics circulating in the Middle Ages, it was so popular that it was soon re-translated into Hebrew, not once but three times! Gerrit Bos and Michael McVaugh have edited the Latin and Hebrew texts, accompanying them with an English translation and a full commentary situating the original Arabic against the medical writings available to tenth-century Islam. The contents of the work range remarkably widely, covering skin diseases, eye and ear infections, teething, vomiting and diarrhea, constipation, worms, and bladder stones, among other things, outlining their causes, symptoms, and possible treatments.
Editor: Kenneth G. Zysk
In The Indian System of Human Marks, Zysk offers a literary history of the Indian system of knowledge, which details divination by means of the marks on the bodies of both men and women. In addition to a historical analysis, the work includes texts and translations of the earliest treatises in Sanskrit. This is followed by a detailed philological analysis of the texts and annotations to the translations.
The history follows the Indian system’s evolution from its roots in ancient Mesopotamian collections of omen on the human body to modern-day practice in Rajasthan in the north and Tamilnadu in the south. A special feature of the book is Zysk’s edition and translation of the earliest textual collection of the system in the Gargīyajyotiṣa from the 1st century CE. The system of human marks is one of the few Indian textual sources that links ancient India with the antique cultures of Mesopotamia and Greece.
Introduction, Critical Edition and Commentary
Author: Paul Foster
Since its discovery in 1886/87 there has been no full-scale English-language treatment of the Gospel of Peter. This book rectifies that gap in scholarship by discussing a range of introductory issues and debates in contemporary scholarship, providing a new critical edition of the text and a comprehensive commentary. New arguments are brought forward for the dependence of the Gospel of Peter upon the synoptic gospels. The theological perspectives of the text are seen as reflecting second-century popular Christian thought. This passion account is viewed as a highly significant window into the way later generations of Christians received and rewrote traditions concerning Jesus.
A Critical Edition of Chrysopoeia and Other Alchemical Poems, with an Introduction, English Translation and Commentary
Author: Matteo Soranzo
In Giovanni Aurelio Augurello (1441-1524) and Renaissance Alchemy, Matteo Soranzo offers the first in-depth study of the life and works of Augurello, Italian alchemist, poet and art connoisseur from the time of Giorgione. Analysed, annotated and translated into English for the first time, Augurello’s poetry reveals a unique blend of late medieval alchemical doctrines, Northern Italian antiquarianism and Marsilio Ficino’s Platonism, enriching conventional narratives of Renaissance humanism.
Author: Harry Vredeveld
As the University of Erfurt collapsed in the early 1520s, Hessus faced losing his livelihood. To cope, he imagined himself a shape-changing Proteus. Transforming first into a lawyer, then a physician, he finally became a teacher at the Nuremberg academy organized by Philip Melanchthon. Volume 5 traces this story via Hessus's poems of 1524-1528: "Some Rules for Preserving Good Health" (1524; 1531), with attached "Praise of Medicine" and two sets of epigrams; "Three Elegies" (1526), two praising the Nuremberg school and one attacking a criticaster; "Venus Triumphant" (1527), with poems on Joachim Camerarius’s wedding; "Against the Hypocrisy of the Monastic Habit" (1527), with four Psalm paraphrases; and "Seventeen Bucolic Idyls" (1528), updating the "Bucolicon" of 1509 and adding five idyls.
Uberto Decembrio’s Four Books on the Commonwealth ( De re publica libri IV, ca. 1420), edited and translated by Paolo Ponzù Donato, is one of the earliest examples of the reception of Plato’s Republic in the fifteenth century. The humanistic dialogue provides an illuminating insight into such themes as justice, the best government, the morals of the prince and citizen, education, and religion. Decembrio’s dialogue is dedicated to Filippo Maria Visconti, duke of Milan, the ‘worst enemy’ of Florence. Making use of literary and documentary sources, Ponzù Donato convincingly proves that Decembrio’s thought, which shares many points with the Florentine humanist Leonardo Bruni, belongs to the same world of Civic Humanism.