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Anchoring Cultural Formation in the First Millennium BCE
Canonisation is fundamental to the sustainability of cultures. This volume is meant as a (theoretical) exploration of the process, taking Eurasian societies from roughly the first millennium BCE (Babylonian, Assyrian, Persian, Greek, Egyptian, Jewish and Roman) as case studies. It focuses on canonisation as a form of cultural formation, asking why and how canonisation works in this particular way and explaining the importance of the first millennium BCE for these question and vice versa. As a result of this focus, notions like anchoring, cultural memory, embedding and innovation play an important role throughout the book.
The Brill Septuagint Monograph Series seeks to be a premier venue for publication of scholarly work on the Septuagint, as the full corpus of Greek texts that came to be identified with the Old Testament in Greek. The monograph series is a supplement to the well-established Brill Septuagint Commentary Series and therefore has the primary purpose of offering a venue for monographs and edited collections of essays that promote primarily, but not exclusively, the aims of the Brill Septuagint Commentaries. This aim includes providing the opportunity to address issues and questions that may arise from the study of the Septuagint with specific focus upon the Greek text as received, used, and interpreted within early Judaism and Christianity.
Scripture as Written and Read in Antiquity
The Pericope series aims at making available data on unit delimitation found in biblical and related manuscripts to the scholarly world and provides a platform for evaluating hitherto largely neglected evidence for the benefit of biblical interpretation. The series has been discontinued with Brill and has been transferred to https://sheffieldphoenix.com/browse.asp?serid=36
This series publishes authoritative text editions of the so-called "Old Testament Pseudepigrapha", apocalyptic and apocryphal works written by Jews and Christians in the "intertestamental" period and the early centuries of our era.
Studies in Philo of Alexandria publishes monographs and collections of essays focusing on the study of Philo of Alexandria and his cultural environment. The series aims to present a wide spectrum of studies covering the religious and philosophical background as well as the main streams of thought of his time.

The series welcomes contributions on philosophical, historical, exegetical, and theological subjects as well as studies on literary issues.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.
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In this book, DeJong explores Deuteronomy’s redefinition of prophecy in Mosaic terms. He traces the history of Deuteronomy’s concept of the prophet like Moses from the seventh century BCE to the first century CE, and demonstrates the ways in which Jewish and Christian texts were influenced by and responded to Deuteronomy’s creation of a Mosaic norm for prophetic claims. This wide-ranging discussion illuminates the development of normative discourses in Judaism and Christianity, and illustrates the far-reaching impact of Deuteronomy’s thought.
Volume Editors: and
This book offers a new and inclusive approach to Western exegesis up to 1100. For too long, modern scholars have examined Jewish and Christian exegesis apart from each other. This is not surprising, given how religious, social, and linguistic borders separated Jews and Christians. But they worked to a great extent on the same texts. Christians were keenly aware that they relied on translation. The contributions to this volume reveal how both sides worked on parallel tracks, posing similar questions and employing more or less the same techniques, and in some rare instances, interdependently.
Canon as a Voice of Answerability
Previous scholarship hints at the connection between Judges 19–21 and Ruth (as set in dialogue), but there has yet to be a study to articulate this relationship. Through a Bakhtinian-canonical perspective, a comparative analysis of these texts unveils intertextual correlations. Lexical and thematic connections include shared idioms, contrasting themes of חרם (“ban”) andחסד (“loving–kindness,” “covenant–faithfulness”), silence and speech, abuse and potential for abuse, gendered violence and feminine agency. This case-study reveals that Ruth, as a text and as a woman, embodies a voice of answerability to the silenced and abused women in Judges 19–21
These essays reflect the lively debate about the sectarian movement of the Scrolls. They debate the degree to which the movement was separated from the rest of Judaism, and whether there was one or several watershed moments in the separation. Notable contributions include a cluster of essays on the Teacher of Righteousness and a thorough survey of the archaeology of Qumran. The texts are problematic in historical research because they rely on biblical stereotypes. Nonetheless, possible interpretations can be compared and degrees of probability debated. The debate is significant not only for the sect but for the nature of ancient Judaism.