Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 37 items for :

  • Hebrew Bible x
  • Biblical Studies x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author: Jean Maurais
Much can be learned about a translation’s linguistic and cultural context by studying it as a text, a literary artifact of the culture that produced it. However, its nature as a translation warrants a careful approach, one that pays attention to the process by which its various features came about. In Characterizing Old Greek Deuteronomy as an Ancient Translation, Jean Maurais develops a framework derived from Descriptive Translation Studies to bring both these aspects in conversation. He then outlines how the Deuteronomy translator went about his task and provides a characterization of the work as a literary product.
Scholars working with ancient scrolls seek ways to extract maximum information from the multitude of fragments. Various methods were applied to that end on the Dead Sea Scrolls as well as on other ancient texts. The present book augments these methods to a full-scale protocol, while adapting them to a new computerized environment. Fundamental methodological issues are illuminated as part of the discussion, and the potential margin of error is provided on an empirical basis, as practiced in the sciences. The method is then exemplified with regard to the scroll 4Q418a, a copy of a wisdom composition from Qumran.
with Annotated Transcription of Geniza Fragments
Author: Paul R. Moore
Targum Canticles, composed in the dialectally eclectic idiom of Late Jewish Literary Aramaic (LJLA), had immense historic popularity among Jewish communities worldwide. In this work, Paul R. Moore thoroughly analyses several of the Targum’s grammatical peculiarities overlooked by previous studies. Through this prism, he considers its literary influences, composition, and LJLA as a precursor of the highly eccentric Aramaic of the 13th century Spanish cabalistic masterpiece, The Zohar. The study includes transcriptions and analysis of the previously unpublished of fragments of the Targum from the Cairo Geniza, and what is possibly its earliest, known translation into Judaeo-Arabic.
Re-Thinking Textual Stability and Fluidity in the War Text manuscripts
Author: Hanna Vanonen
In this volume, Hanna Vanonen offers a fresh view to the Milhamah and Sefer ha-Milhamah manuscripts by producing a thorough close-reading analysis of them, paying attention not only to their contents but also to manuscripts as material artifacts. Vanonen demonstrates that studying the stability and instability of the War traditions does more justice to the complex material than a traditional chronological literary-critical model. In addition, Vanonen argues that at least liturgical use and study purposes may have created needs for producing different manuscripts that were simultaneously important.
Clément d’Alexandrie (150-215 Ap. J.-C.) est l’un des penseurs les plus brillants des premiers siècles chrétiens. Son enseignement, tout autant pétri de la Bible que de la pensée grecque, nous révèle la nature des débats aux premières heures de l’expansion du christianisme. Ce livre aborde un sujet peu étudié à ce jour, à savoir sa pensée sur l’Église. C’est pourtant un sujet récurent de ses ouvrages, où il réfléchit longuement sur l’Église à partir de l’être et la mission du Logos divin. L’analyse du discours de Clément sur l’Église permet donc de revisiter les intuitions principales de sa christologie tout en apportant un éclairage sur sa perception de l’identité chrétienne à une époque où celle-ci est encore en construction.

Clement of Alexandria (AD 150-215) is one of the most brilliant thinkers of the early Christian centuries. His teaching, steeped as much in the Bible as in Greek thought, reveals to us the nature of the debates in the early days of the expansion of Christianity. This book deals with a subject little studied to this day, namely his thoughts on the Church. Yet it is a recurring subject in his works, where he reflects at length on the Church from the point of view of the being and the mission of the divine Logos. Analysis of Clement’s discourse on the Church therefore makes it possible to revisit the main intuitions of his Christology while shedding light on his perception of Christian identity at a time when it is still under construction.
Author: Steve Mason
Josephus wrote his most impactful history, The Judean War, in seven volumes. The volume translated here and furnished with a full historical commentary, is pivotal. Filled with high drama and penetrating assessments of human behavior under extreme duress, it brings readers from Galilee and mass suicide at Gamala in the Golan to Vespasian’s rise to imperial power. In between, Josephus explains how first John of Gischala and then Simon bar Giora came to be the two dominant figures in Jerusalem, setting up the siege of Titus. This volume also introduces the war’s most famous antagonists: the Zealots (or Disciples).
Karl Barth and the Tasks of Eschatology
Volume Editors: Kaitlyn Dugan and Philip G. Ziegler
In this volume, leading systematic theologians and New Testament scholars working today undertake a fresh and constructive interdisciplinary engagement with key eschatological themes in Christian theology in close conversation with the work of Karl Barth. Ranging from close exegetical studies of Barth’s treatment of eschatological themes in his commentary on Romans or lectures on 1 Corinthians, to examination of his mature dogmatic discussions of death and evil, this volume offers a fascinating variety of insights into both Barth’s theology and its legacy, as well as the eschatological dimensions of the biblical witness and its salience for both the academy and church.

Contributors are: John M. G. Barclay, Douglas Campbell, Christophe Chalamet, Kaitlyn Dugan, Nancy J. Duff, Susan Eastman, Beverly Roberts Gaventa, Grant Macaskill, Kenneth Oakes, Christoph Schwöbel Christiane Tietz, Philip G. Ziegler.
This volume presents the main lectures of the 23rd Congress of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament (IOSOT) held in Aberdeen, United Kingdom, in August 2019. Twenty internationally distinguished scholars present their current research on the Hebrew Bible, including the literary history of the Hebrew text, its Greek translation, and the history of interpretation. Some focus on the semantic and syntactic features of the biblical text and its impact on cultural memory while others deal with textual witnesses in the Dead Sea scrolls, Ethiopic sources, and Arabic translations. The volume gives readers a representative view of recent research on the Hebrew Bible.
Conversations with Orthodoxy
Author: Ivana Noble
In this volume of Essays in Ecumenical Theology Ivana Noble engages in conversations with Orthodox theologians and spiritual writers on diverse themes. These include the discovery of the human heart, what illumination by divine light means, the relationship between prayer and attitudes and acts of social solidarity, the problematic nature of sacrificial thinking as the way to express redemption through Christ, the ecological dimension of theological anthropology, the need for freedom to coexist with love for others and why institutions need to turn not only to their own traditions but also to the Spirit that blows where it wills.
Author: P. van der Lugt
In this volume, Pieter van der Lugt offers a comprehensive analysis of the rhetorical structure of Isaiah. As in his previous studies on the Book of Job and the Psalter the author demonstrates that classical Hebrew poetry displays a well-defined structure consisting of balanced main parts (cantos) and subdivision into strophes. This rhetorical starting point is of crucial importance for the delimitation of the individual poems in Isaiah 40-48 and in many cases determines their interpretation. Subsequently, it is demonstrated that the successive compositions form well-defined and coherent cycles of poems.