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Joseph Drexler-Dreis

This essay develops a response to the historical situation of the North Atlantic world in general and the United States in particular through theological reflection. It offers an overview of some decolonial perspectives with which theologians can engage, and argues for a general perspective for a decolonial theology as a possible response to modern/colonial structures and relations of power, particularly in the United States. Decolonial theory holds together a set of critical perspectives that seek the end of the modern/colonial world-system and not merely a democratization of its benefits. A decolonial theology, Joseph Drexler-Dreis argues, critiques how the confinement of knowledge to European traditions has closed possibilities for understanding historical encounters with divinity, and thus possibilities of critical reflection. A decolonial theology reflects critically on a historical situation in light of faith in a divine reality, the understanding of which is liberated from the monopoly of modern/colonial ways of knowing, in order to catalyze social transformation.

Educating Media Literacy

The Need for Critical Media Literacy in Teacher Education

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Allison T. Butler

Critical media literacy is a necessary part of young people’s education and can foster the space for a more thoroughly informed and involved citizenry. In order to make critical media literacy sustainable in K-12 classrooms, learning and application of it must begin with teachers, preferably during their formal schooling. Educating Media Literacy is a manifesto for the inclusion of media literacy in teacher education and, by extension, in K-12 classrooms. Through a discussion of critical media literacy’s aims and the role of teacher education in the United States, this book argues for the inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education.

Educating Media Literacy addresses two separate topics – teacher education and media literacy – and illustrates how they are intertwined: The United States struggles simultaneously with how best to train and retain prospective teachers and how to foster a better understanding of mainstream media. These two struggles can join forces and move towards a solution through the following: The inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education programs.

Intelligent Internationalization

The Shape of Things to Come

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Edited by Kara A. Godwin and Hans de Wit

In 2015, Laura Rumbley put forward the notion that higher education—in a highly complex, globally interdependent world—would be wise to commit to an agenda of "intelligent internationalization" (I2). I2 turns on the notion that "the development of a thoughtful alliance between the research, practitioner, and policy communities," in tandem with key decision makers in leadership roles, is essential for institutions and systems of higher education seeking sustained relevance and vitality through their internationalization efforts. Does "intelligent internationalization" make sense? What is faulty, misguided, or missing from this analysis that could be strengthened through further consideration? On the other hand, what speaks to its value as an idea or agenda to advance the way that internationalization is understood and enacted in the world? These issues will be addressed in this book which builds on a 2018 Symposium on Intelligent Internationalization.

Voices of Social Justice and Diversity in a Hawai‘i Context

Grandparents, Grandchildren, Schools, Communities, and Churches

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Edited by Amarjit Singh, M. Luafata Simanu-Klutz and Mike Devine

This book presents nuanced small-scale studies and reflective essays, and is about voices of contemporary grandparents and grandchildren living in the State of Hawai'i which is rapidly going through economic, social, educational, and cultural transformation ushered in by forces of globalization and McDonaldization of society.

Hawai‘i is generally known as a great tourist destination that is no less than an imagined paradise. Hawai‘i is more than solely a site for tourism; it has a culturally and socially diverse population, and has a contested social history. In this context, in a deeper sense, the book gives the reader glimpses of family members at the level of intimacy among themselves in their place based situated interactions in today’s Hawai‘i. In its real essence, this book is an authentic collection of research papers, short stories, anecdotes, memories and reminiscences; of aloha (love, compassion, kindness) and mahalo (thanks, respect, and praise); of longing and search for legacy by diasporic elders, immigrants, settlers, American citizens, hyphenated Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders; by grandparents and grandchildren of diverse and multiple ethnicities, cultures, and races who have struggled hard through many decades to make Hawai‘i their permanent and beloved home and place, or long-term residence to live and raise their families.

The set of self-narratives in this book may have significant implications for understanding the process of aging in the State of Hawai'i; for social aging is both an individual and a social process in the sense that an individual’s biography is intimately related to her/his society’s biography. For “doing” roles such as being grandparents and grandchildren are heavily defined and structured by prevailing social and cultural processes.

The book may be useful for educators and students who are working and studying in areas such as education, sociology of family, social work, local and global social change, indigenous cultures and societies, alternative modernities and indigenizing social movements, race and ethnic relations, settler societies, social justice, health care, social gerontology, diaspora and immigration studies, and those working with youth in communities.

Ellen A. Brantlinger

When Meaning Falters and Words Fail, Ideology Matters

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Edited by Linda Ware and Roger Slee

Ellen A. Brantlinger: When Meanings Falter and Words Fail, Ideology Matters celebrates the work of and is dedicated to the memory of Ellen A. Brantlinger, a scholar-activist who spent most of her professional career as a professor of special education at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana in the United States of America. Ellen was recognized internationally as an educator and critical theorist and celebrated for her incisive and unyielding critique of special education research, policy, and practice that spanned several decades. Brantlinger held that the impoverished nature of special education theory and practice was rooted to conformance with the most rigid constructs of standardization, normalcy, and its resulting inequitable outcomes for children with disabilities. When the push for educational inclusion gained currency in some quarters in the United States (mid-1980s), Brantlinger was among a handful of scholars who identified special education as the major obstacle to the inclusion of disabled students in the educational system. She was widely published in North American journals well known in special education, teacher education, multicultural education, sociology of education, urban education, school counseling, curriculum theory, qualitative education, and feminist teaching. This book offers an elaboration of the scholarly contributions made by Ellen Brantlinger to research in education, special education, inclusive education, and the early development of Disability Studies in Education. Many of its contributors move between the paradigmatic locations of special education, inclusive education, and disability studies as they consider Ellen’s influence.

Contributors are: Julie Allan, Subini A. Annamma, Jessica Bacon, Alicia A. Broderick, Kathleen M. Collins, David J. Connor, Dianne L. Ferguson, Philip M. Ferguson, Amy L. Ferrel, Beth Ferri, Joanne Kim, Janette Klingner, Corrine Li, Brooke A. Moore, Emily A. Nusbaum, and Janet S. Sauer.

Living Sexuality

Stories of LGBTQ Relationships, Identities, and Desires

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Keith Berry, Catherine M. Gillotti and Tony Adams

There has never been a more crucial time for an intimate and thorough examination of the ways in which sexuality informs people’s lives. In Living Sexuality: Stories of LGBTQ Relationships, Identities, and Desires, the authors use autoethnography and personal narrative to provide first-hand accounts of the connections between sexuality, particularly LGBTQ identities, and the everyday experiences of relationships. Each story also invites readers to understand how sexuality informs communication as it occurs within diverse cultural contexts. In addition, the stories often focus on taboo issues overlooked or ignored in mainstream research about sexuality. Discussion questions appear at the end of each story that should stimulate engagement by students, instructors, and researchers.

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Charles C. Hinkley II

In this revised edition of Moral Conflicts of Organ Retrieval: A Case for Constructive Pluralism, Charles Hinkley elaborates on his moral philosophy of constructive pluralism and updates the literature on organ retrieval strategies. Hinkley challenges a deeply entrenched moral triad: 1) moral values are comparable; 2) the weighing metaphor helps us conceptualize decisions regarding conflicting values; and 3) there is a single best discoverable response to a moral decision. This book offers an alternative—cases of incomparability, a constructing or making metaphor, and multiple permissible responses to some moral questions. Constructive pluralism has important implications for organ transplantation, health, and ethics.

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Melinda McGarrah Sharp

Multiple forms of oppression, injustice, and violence today have roots in histories of colonialism. This connection to the past feels familiar for some and less relevant for others. Understanding and responding to these connections is more crucial than ever, yet some resist rather than face this task directly. Others resist oppressive postcolonial conditions.

Using intercultural stories and pastoral care scholarship, this book charts pathways through five resistances (not me, not here, not now, not relevant, not possible) to awaken creative pastoral care in a postcolonial world. McGarrah Sharp recommends practices that everyone can do: believing in each other, revisiting how histories are taught, imagining more passable futures, heeding prophetic poets, and crossing borders with healthy boundaries.

Faith in African Lived Christianity

Bridging Anthropological and Theological Perspectives

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Edited by Karen Lauterbach and Mika Vähäkangas

Faith in African Lived Christianity – Bridging Anthropological and Theological Perspectives offers a comprehensive, empirically rich and interdisciplinary approach to the study of faith in African Christianity. The book brings together anthropology and theology in the study of how faith and religious experiences shape the understanding of social life in Africa. The volume is a collection of chapters by prominent Africanist theologians, anthropologists and social scientists, who take people’s faith as their starting point and analyze it in a contextually sensitive way. It covers discussions of positionality in the study of African Christianity, interdisciplinary methods and approaches and a number of case studies on political, social and ecological aspects of African Christian spirituality.

From Easter to Holy Week

The Paschal Mystery and Liturgical Renewal in the Twentieth Century

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Laura E. Moore

The story of the twentieth-century Liturgical Movement is, more than anything else, about the rediscovery and renewed understanding of the fundamental reality of the Paschal Mystery and of the Paschal identity of the Church. This identity is expressed and celebrated whenever the Body of Christ – every member – welcomes new members in the waters of baptism and feasts with them in the Eucharist, especially as these are celebrated during Holy Week.

This book explores this rediscovery, first in the Roman Catholic Church and then in the Episcopal Church and other Churches of the Anglican Communion, and looks in particular at how both grassroots and official work played a role in renewing and restoring the liturgical celebrations of Holy Week.