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Wer war Apollonius von Tyana? In der Antike rankten sich viele Legenden um diesen Mann. War er ein großer pythagoräischer Weiser oder doch ein Scharlatan? Eusebius von Caesarea will dieser Frage auf den Grund gehen. Angestachelt durch die Schrift „Philalethes“ des römischen Beamten Sossianus Hierocles widmet er sich einer Untersuchung dieser umstrittenen Gestalt. Hierocles sah in Apollonius einen besseren Christus. Eusebius aber hält dem entgegen, dass Schriftsteller wie Hierocles einen Mythos um den Tyanäer erschaffen hätten, der der historischen Person nicht gerecht wird. Gemeinsame Grundlage der Diskussion ist dabei die „Vita Apollonii“ des Flavius Philostratus. Diese Arbeit bietet erstmals die deutsche Komplettübersetzung von „Contra Hieroclem“, angereichert durch eine Einleitung und einen ausführlichen Kommentar.
The Skandapurāṇa Project
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The Skandapurāṇa offers an unprecedented glimpse into the development of Śiva worship and his mythology. This Sanskrit Purāṇa, long considered lost, was known only obliquely from testimonia in digests of Brahminical customs and social regulations. Transmitted to us in several palm leaf manuscripts from Nepal—including the oldest known dated Purāṇa manuscript (810 CE)—as well as paper manuscripts from North India, now at last this seminal text for the understanding of Indian religious traditions is made available in the superb and definitive critical text edition of the Skandapurāṇa Project.
The edition allows far-reaching new insights into the geographical expansion of the earliest community of Śiva devotees called the ‘Pāśupatas’ (the name derived from one of Śiva’s many epithets, Paśupati, ‘Lord of Creatures’) amidst the development of other religious communities in early India, and especially, the cultivation of somatic and mental techniques (yoga), the salvific potential of pilgrimage to Śiva’s many shrines, as well as the worship of his iconic emblem (liṅga), all of which practices were to become definitive features of the devotional repertoire of medieval—and today's—Śiva worshippers. The Skandapurāṇa is also a vital source for the history of the mythology of Viṣṇu and the Goddess.
Firmly grounded in the scholarly methods that are the hallmark of classical Indology—philology, textual criticism, and the meticulous study of manuscript sources—the Skandapurāṇa Critical Text Edition comes with an annotated English synopsis of this important, rich, but also entertaining text.

‘The Skandapurāṇa, dating in all probability from the seventh century and preserved in manuscript evidence from Nepal that postdates its creation by no more than about two centuries, provides a uniquely clear window into the world of lay Śaiva devotion and its supporting mythologies during the seminal period when the Śaiva ascetic orders were moving with the support of the laity to the centre of Indian religion. The project to produce a critical edition and analysis of the whole of this rich and lucid text is among the most important in current Indological research. The volumes published so far are of very high quality both in the scholarship of their authors and the interest of their contents. The completion of the project will be a major landmark in Indological research.’ - Alexis Sanderson
Editor:
The Islamic Translation Series aims to make scholarly Arabic texts from a wide range of disciplines available to an international, English-language readership. Comprising parallel English-Arabic texts, volumes in this series are suitable for specialists, students and all those interested in the intellectual traditions of the Islamic world.

This series was previously published by Brigham Young University Press.
Winner of the 2021 Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding (category: translation from Arabic into English)

This is an unabridged, annotated, translation of the great Damascene savant and saint Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya’s (d. 751/1350) Madārij al-Sālikīn. Conceived as a critical commentary on an earlier Sufi classic by the great Hanbalite scholar Abū Ismāʿīl of Herat, Madārij aims to rejuvenate Sufism’s Qurʾanic foundations. The original work was a key text for the Sufi initiates, composed in terse, rhyming prose as a master’s instruction to the aspiring seeker on the path to God, in a journey of a hundred stations whose ultimate purpose was to be lost to one’s self (fanāʾ) and subsist (baqāʾ) in God. The translator, Ovamir (ʿUwaymir) Anjum, provides an extensive introduction and annotation to this English-Arabic face-to-face presentation of this masterpiece of Islamic psychology.
The Contemporary Sources for the Study of the Council of Nicaea (304–337)
“Fontes Nicaenae Synodi” is a sourcebook that provides the original text with an English translation and footnotes of the contemporary sources for the study of the Council of Nicaea (325). These sources are letters, canons, creeds, imperial documents, and synodal statements that deal with the theological, institutional, and disciplinary issues discussed at Nicaea – not only the “Arian” controversy. The book includes texts that are contemporary with the events, i.e., written between the beginning of the Melitian crisis (ca. 304) and the death of Constantine (337). They were passed on in Greek, Latin, and Syriac. The year 2025 will see a centenary of the synod of Nicaea (325–2025), which will be a promising scenario for discussing the Nicaean Council, a pivotal event in the formation of Western culture.
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"Dass die Mistforke leichter sei als die Schreibfeder und der Schweinestall besser rieche als die Stube der Studenten" – gegen diesen Irrtum kämpft 1525 Jacobus Montanus mit einhundert Musterbriefen an. Seine Schüler sollen sie aus ihrer Muttersprache ins Lateinische übersetzen. Ergänzende Formulierungshilfen aus antiken Autoren bahnen ihnen den Weg zu gelehrter Eloquenz. Obwohl unter Zeitgenossen hoch angesehen, liegt keines der Werke des westfälischen Humanisten in moderner Ausgabe vor. Die ‚Centuria epistolarium formularum‘ / ‚Hundertschaft Briefmuster‘ führt ins Zentrum seines Schaffens. Sie wird hier erstmals in kritischer Ausgabe vorgelegt. Ihre Briefe bieten alltagsnahe Einblicke in die Lebens- und Bildungswelt Westfalens, und ihre Lektüre bereitet oft Vergnügen. Eine moderne Übersetzung erleichtert den Zugang. Ein ausgiebiger Kommentar erschließt sie dem an vormoderner Alltags-, Bildungs- und Regionalgeschichte Interessierten.
Editor / Translator:
Nahj al-Balāghah, the celebrated compendium of orations, letters, and sayings of ʿAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib (d. 40/661) compiled by al-Sharīf al-Raḍī (d. 406/1015), is a masterpiece of Arabic literature and Islamic wisdom studied and memorized avidly and continually for over a thousand years. Showcasing ʿAlī’s life and travails in his own words, it also transcribes his profound reflections on piety and virtue, and on just and compassionate governance. Tahera Qutbuddin’s meticulously researched critical edition based on the earliest 5th/11th-century manuscripts, with a lucid, annotated facing-page translation, brings to the modern reader the power and beauty of this influential text, and confirms the aptness of Raḍī’s title, “The Way of Eloquence.”
Volume I: Essays / Volume 2-1: Arabic Edition / Volume 2-2: Arabic Edition / Volume 3-1: Annotated English Translation / Volume 3-2: Annotated English Translation, Appendices and Indices
An online, Open Access version of this work is also available from Brill.

A Literary History of Medicine by the Syrian physician Ibn Abī Uṣaybiʿah (d. 1270) is the earliest comprehensive history of medicine. It contains biographies of over 432 physicians, ranging from the ancient Greeks to the author’s contemporaries, describing their training and practice, often as court physicians, and listing their medical works; all this interlaced with poems and anecdotes. These volumes present the first complete and annotated translation along with a new edition of the Arabic text showing the stages in which the author composed the work. Introductory essays provide important background. The reader will find on these pages an Islamic society that worked closely with Christians and Jews, deeply committed to advancing knowledge and applying it to health and wellbeing.
Beautifying the Ugly and Uglifying the Beautiful by Abū Manṣūr al-Thaʿālibī (d. 429/1038)
In his Beautifying the Ugly and Uglifying the Beautiful (Taḥsīn al-qabīḥ wa-taqbīḥ al-ḥasan) the prolific anthologist al-Thaʿālibī (d. 429/1038) offers a thematically arranged selection of Arabic poems and prose anecdotes or sayings with contrary or paradoxical purport, such as praise of miserliness, boredom, sickness, and death, or condemnation of generosity, intelligence, youth, and music. The book is both entertaining and informative, giving insight in premodern Arab and Islamic culture. It contains a new edition of the Arabic text and a complete English translation (the first in any language) with extensive annotation, preceded by an introduction with the necessary background of the genre.