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The central argument in this book revolves around the significance of an African philosophy of higher education. Such a philosophy of higher education is geared towards cultivating democratic iterations, co-belonging, and critique within human encounters. Together, these actions can enhance intellectual activism within and beyond the encounters. A philosophy of higher education is constituted by a philosophical act of reflexivity according to which (how), freedom (both autonomous and communal), cosmopolitanism (learning to live with differences and otherness), and caring with others (ubuntu) can be rhythmically practised. What makes an African philosophy of higher education distinctive and realisable is that practices ought to be based on iterations, co-belonging, and critique. If intellectual activism were not to become a major act of resistance on the basis of which educational, political, and societal dystopias can be undermined, such a philosophy of higher education would not have a real purpose. An African philosophy of higher education is an intellectually activist endeavour because of its concern to be oppositional to constraints in and about higher education. In conversation with such an understanding of African philosophy of higher education, contributors to this volume offer responses to why human freedom, cosmopolitanism, and caring with others (ubuntu) can be rhythmically enacted.
The Construction of the Feminine Voice in Early Medieval Chinese Literature
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This book studies the formation of the male-constructed conventional voice of women in Chinese literature from the 3rd to 6th century.
It highlights specific moments during which the feminine voice became recognized, accepted, and stabilized, including the shift of focus from the performative to the textual in female representations; the formation of a male literary community; the popularity of romanticized historical narratives; and the emerging sense of literary history.
This study emphasizes the historicity of the feminine voice and strives to question and challenge established notions about textual stability, authorship, the literary canon, and literary history.
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Oliver Kahl and Henrietta Sharp Cockrell present a facsimile edition of a newly discovered medieval medical text attributed to the famous physician Abū Bakr Muḥammad ibn Zakariyyāʾ al-Rāzī (Rhazes, d. 925 CE). This unique Arabic manuscript comprises a work in the health regimen genre titled “Book of the Crown” (Kitāb al-Iklīl). Copied in 1220 CE and bound parallel to the text (flip-bound), it is highly unusual, both in terms of physical appearance and topical choices. The edition is accompanied by an annotated English translation en regard, a detailed introduction including a codicological study, and bilingual indices.