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Edited by Wouter J. Hanegraaff

NOW AVAILABLE IN ONE VOLUME
This is the first comprehensive reference work to cover the entire domain of “Gnosis and Western Esotericism” from the period of Late Antiquity to the present. Containing around 400 articles by over 180 international specialists, it provides critical overviews discussing the nature and historical development of all its important currents and manifestations, from Gnosticism and Hermetism to Astrology, Alchemy and Magic, from the Hermetic Tradition of the Renaissance to Rosicrucianism and Christian Theosophy, and from Freemasonry and Illuminism to 19th-century Occultism and the contemporary New Age movement. Furthermore it contains articles about the life and work of all the major personalities in the history of Gnosis and Western Esotericism, discussing their ideas, significance, and historical influence.
The Dictionary of Gnosis & Western Esotericism was selected Choice Outstanding Academic Title in 2006.

This one volume edition is an unabridged version of the two volume edition published in 2005, for details click here

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Edited by Allen Frank and Mirkasyim Usmanov

This biographical dictionary, based on a Turkic manuscript compiled in 1912, is essential for all those interested in the Islamic history of Central Asia under Russian and Chinese rule. Covering the period from 1770 - 1912, it brings to life the muslim communities of Sufis and scholars of the eastern Kazakh steppe. Its extensive biographical information provides fresh insights into the intellectual, political, and religious life of a region for which indigenous Islamic sources are virtually unknown.
With a historical and textological introduction, full English translation, extensive notes, and an Arabic-script Turkic text.

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Thomas Sullivan

This volume presents a biographical register of the 583 members of religious orders licensed in theology at the University of Paris between 1373 and 1500.
The register is preceded by a discussion of the sources used in its preparation and a list of all the clerics—secular as well as religious—licensed at Paris between 1373 and 1500. Appended to the register is list of those licensed arranged chronologically by religious order and an index of all the religious arranged by baptismal name.
The register is offered in service to historians of the medieval university and of religious life in the late middle ages, as well as those interested in the professoriate of the premier theological faculty of its day.

Rotuli Parisienses

Supplications to the Pope from the University of Paris, Volume II: 1352-1378

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Edited by William J. Courtenay and Eric D. Goddard

This edition of texts resulting from supplications by the University of Paris for papal benefice support in the second half of the fourteenth century provides new biographical information on some 1600 Parisian masters, many of them previously undocumented.

Rotuli Parisienses

Supplications to the Pope from the University of Paris, Volume I: 1316-1349

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Edited by Courtenay

This volume contains a complete edition of the rotuli, or benefice supplications, sent to the papacy by masters at the University of Paris in the first half of the fourteenth century. It also contains the letters of provision, in abbreviated form, that resulted from those petitions, along with the letters that resulted from the numerous university supplications that have not survived. This edition represents the largest body of new documentation for the pre-fifteenth century University to appear since the publication of the Chartularium Universitatis Parisiensis at the end of the nineteenth century.
The edition is prefaced with a long introduction that describes the origin and history of the fourteenth-century innovation of collective supplications by universities, the method of recovering the results of lost rotuli for Paris, and the stages in the process of supplication from Paris, through the papal curia at Avignon, and back to Paris. The book concludes with an index of the names of scholars as well as a place-name index locating the parish and collegiate churches mentioned in the texts. Because the University of Paris submitted rotuli every two to three years, and because the petitions and letters contain abundant personal information, the texts provide a sequential picture of the Parisian professoriate across four decades before the Black Death.

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Gábor Takács

The multi-volume Etymological Dictionary of Egyptian by Gábor Takács "promises to open a new chapter in Egyptian and Afro-Asiatic comparative lingustics" (A. Dolgopolsky, in Israel Oriental Studies). The amount of material offered, the extensive treatment of scholarly discussions on each item, and the insights into the connections of Egyptian and the related Afro-Asiatic (Semito-Hamitic) languages, including many new lexical parallels, will make it an indispensable tool for comparative purposes and an unchallenged starting point for every linguist in the field.
This second volume is in fact the first volume of the very etymological dictionary. It comprises the Egyptian words with initial b-, p-, and f-. The reader will find the etymological entries even more detailed than those of the introductory volume, due to the full retrospective presentation of all etymologies proposed since A. Erman's time, and thanks to an extremely detailed discussion of all possible relevant data even on the less known Afro-Asiatic cognates to the Egyptian roots.

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R. van der Molen

The present volume is the long-awaited lexicon of Egyptian coffin texts. In 1961 A. de Buck published his important seven-volume Egyptian Coffin Texts. The major Egyptian dictionaries having appeared before that date, De Buck's 1961 corpus of texts was left without lexicographical covering since then.
The importance of these texts, however, is considerable for a variety of reasons; they are one of the most important literary texts of classical Egypt; the many variants greatly enlarge our understanding of grammar and linguistic structures; the coffin texts are magical texts, the effectiveness of which depended upon the exact reproductions of the original spells.
Included are all the variant hieroglyphic forms, and the fragments, often reconstructed, contained in De Buck's volume 7. Special features are a list (reproduction) of yet unreadable hieroglyphs, as well as a list of the cryptic writings, contained in the coffin texts.
The dictionary is shaped after Erman & Grapow's Wörterbuch der Ägyptischen Sprache and Faulkner's Egyptian Dictionary.

Etymological Dictionary of Egyptian, Volume 1

Volume 1: A Phonological Introduction

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Gábor Takács

This is the introductory volume to the first dictionary on the etymological relations between ancient Egyptian and other Afro-Asiatic languages.
Gábor Takács’ new multi-volume Etymological Dictionary of Egyptian (now to appear at regular intervals of about 12-18 months) will be a hallmark in Egyptian and Afro-Asiatic linguistics. The amount of material offered, the extensive treatment of scholarly discussions on each item, and the insights into the connections of Egyptian with its related Afro-Asiatic languages, including many new lexical parallels, will make it an indispensable tool for comparative and interpretative purposes and the unchallenged starting point for every linguist in the field.

Volume 1, the opening volume of the dictionary, can rightly be called the key to the work; it not only provides the users with a comprehensive analysis of the Afro-Asiatic background of the Egyptian consonant system, but also offers a critical appraisal of linguistic theories on Egyptian historical phonology, the problems surrounding the origins of the Egyptian language, and an extensive bibliography to the dictionary volumes to appear.

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Frederico Corriente

A detailed scientific description of the Andalusi Arabic dialect bundle did not exist until recent times, although the correct understanding of some of its texts bears heavily on many momentous conclusions drawn by contemporary scholars about the extent and depth of cultural interaction between the Arabs and the West.
After many years of work on the grammar of this variety of Neo-Arabic, and having produced accurate editions of its materials, the author now undertakes the task of establishing its lexicon, both synchronically and diachronically, by listing words and idioms and trying to provide the etyma of most items.
This volume will be useful to students of Arabic dialectology and also to those concerned with any kind of literature produced in Al-Andalus, as well as to Romance scholars who may find the solution to many an etymological riddle here.

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Kristeller

A cumulative index to the Iter Italicum volumes 1-6, encompassing the indexes previously published to the individual volumes. Reorganised for ease of use, this invaluable aid to users of Kristeller's monumental work will greatly facilitate access to the huge amount of information found here.