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Acts of Resistance in Late-Modernist Theatre

Writing and Directing in Contemporary Theatre Practice

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Richard Murphet

In Acts of Resistance in Late-Modernist Theatre, Richard Murphet presents a close analysis of the theatre practice of two ground-breaking artists – Richard Foreman and Jenny Kemp – active over the late twentieth and the early twenty-first century. In addition, he tracks the development of a form of ‘epileptic’ writing over the course of his own career as writer/director.
Murphet argues that these three auteurs have developed subversive alternatives to the previously dominant forms of dramatic realism in order to re-think the relationship between theatre and reality. They write and direct their own work, and their artistic experimentation is manifest in the tension created between their content and their form. Murphet closely investigates how the works are made, rather than focusing upon an interpretation of their meaning. Through an examination of working practices, we gain a deeper understanding of the nature of a paradigm shift in theatre launched by late modernism.

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Heather McAlpine

In this book, Heather McAlpine argues that emblematic strategies play a more central role in Pre-Raphaelite poetics than has been acknowledged, and that reading Pre-Raphaelite works with an awareness of these strategies permits a new understanding of the movement’s engagements with ontology, religion, representation, and politics. The emblem is a discursive practice that promises to stabilize language in the face of doubt, making it especially interesting as a site of conflicting responses to Victorian crises of representation. Through analyses of works by the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Christina Rossetti, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Gerard Manley Hopkins, A.C. Swinburne, and William Morris, Emblematic Strategies examines the Pre-Raphaelite movement’s common goal of conveying “truth” while highlighting differences in its adherents’ approaches to that task.

Racine's Andromaque

Absences and Displacements

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Edited by Joseph Harris and Nicholas Hammond

Racine’s Andromaque : Absences and Displacements casts a new look at the dynamism, richness, and complexity of Racine’s first major tragedy (first performed in Paris in 1667), through a collection of articles specially commissioned by the editors Nicholas Hammond and Joseph Harris. Challenging received opinions about the fixity of French ‘classicism’, this volume demonstrates how Racine’s play is preoccupied with absences, displacements, instability, and uncertainty. The articles explore such issues as: movement and transactions, offstage characters and locations, hallucinations and fantasies, love and desire, and translations and adaptations of Racine’s play. This collection will be an invaluable resource for students and scholars of seventeenth-century French theatre.

Contributors: Nicholas Hammond, Joseph Harris, Michael Moriarty, Emilia Wilton-Godberfforde, Delphine Calle, Jennifer Tamas, Michael Hawcroft, Katherine Ibbett, Richard Parish.

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Julie Gaillard

Réalités pseudonymes explore la question de la réalité à travers le prisme du nom propre et de ses mécanismes référentiels dans la littérature et les arts au tournant du 21ème siècle. Julie Gaillard convoque les œuvres de penseurs, auteurs et artistes qui ont en commun de remettre en question l'évidence référentielle du nom propre pour interroger la fabrique du réel et montrer comment il peut être transformé, suspendu ou encore détourné : Jean-François Lyotard, Samuel Beckett, Édouard Levé, ainsi que les artistes Renaud Cojo et Invader. Situé au carrefour de plusieurs disciplines, l'ouvrage interroge la trame de la réalité à l’heure où les sociétés glissent de modalités analogiques à des modalités numériques de sa médiation.

Réalités pseudonymes explores the question of reality through the lens of the proper name and its referential mechanisms in French literature and arts at the turn of the 21st century. Julie Gaillard analyzes the works of thinkers, authors, and artists who all question the referential transparency of the proper name to question the fabric of reality and show how it can be transformed, suspended or even faked: Jean-François Lyotard, Samuel Beckett, Édouard Levé, as well as the artists Renaud Cojo and Invader. Situated at the crossroads of several disciplines, the book questions the fabric of reality at a time when societies are shifting from analogue to digital modalities of its mediation.

Stoicism and Performance

A Joyful Materialism

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Cormac Power

Power’s Stoicism and Performance presents Stoicism as a means of navigating key debates and concepts in contemporary theatre and performance. Stoicism has influenced many of the most cited radical thinkers in the discipline of theatre and performance studies; for instance Deleuze, Foucault, Kristeva, Agamben. A central aim of this work is to bring Stoicism more explicitly into the fold of the discipline, and to use Stoicism to think differently about performance. With a series of chapters covering themes such as performativity, embodiment, emotion, affect and spectatorship, this book finds points of encounter between Stoicism and contemporary understandings and practices of performance. It presents these encounters as modes of transformative experience in relation to our being in the world.

Conrad’s Drama

Contemporary Reviews and Observations

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Edited by John G. Peters

Conrad’s Drama: Contemporary Reviews and Observations collects both book reviews and performance reviews of Conrad’s three plays: The Secret Agent, One Day More, and Laughing Anne. These reviews and observations show how Conrad’s plays were received by his contemporaries. More than this, however, Conrad’s Drama reveals the larger conversations surrounding his plays: the state of British drama in the early 20th century, the role the drama critic has in a play’s reception, and the difficulty most fiction writers experience in trying to write for the stage. No other reference work exists for those studying Conrad’s plays, and this volume should prove to be an indispensable reference work for those working on this topic.