Reform(ing) Education

The Jena-Plan as a Concept for a Child-Centred School

Ralf Koerrenz

"School as counter-public" is the hermeneutic key with which Ralf Koerrenz interprets the school model of the Jena Plan. Similar to the Dalton-Plan or the Winnetka-Plan, the Jena Plan is one of the most important concepts of alternative schools developed in the first half of the 20th century as part of the international movement for alternative education, the “World Education Fellowship”.

Peter Petersen's "Jena Plan" concept must be understood from his educational philosophical foundations. The didactic levels of action at school (teaching, learning) as well as the reflection of theory in pedagogical practice are made understandable by "school as a counter-public". Not least with a view to the today's Jena Plan schools, the question is asked for a context-independent core of what makes a school a Jena Plan school. The opportunities and ambivalences of the model thus become equally visible.

Die Grundschule des Machbaren

Zur Kritik materialistischer Bildungstheorie und -praxis

Roger Behrens

Die Debatten über Bildung und Erziehung sowie deren Sinn und Zweck haben Konjunktur. Obwohl unter einem allgemeinen Vorzeichen der Kritik stehend, spielt eine materialistische Bildungstheorie und -praxis in diesen Debatten keine Rolle mehr.
Noch in den 1970er Jahren gingen von der kritischen Theorie der Bildung, Erziehung und Pädagogik entscheidende Impulse aus; mit kritischen Konzepten wie »materialistische Bildungstheorie« oder »dialektische Pädagogik« konnte das humanistische Bildungsideal auch praktisch aktualisiert werden (antiautoritäre Erziehung, Kinderladenbewegung, freie Schulen etc.). Allerdings sind solche gesellschaftlichen Interventionen heute restlos integriert, die kritischen Motive weitgehend absorbiert, entschärft oder schlechterdings vergessen. Eingebettet in eine kritische Begriffs- und Gesellschaftsanalyse rekonstruiert die Studie historisch und systematisch dieses »Scheitern«, beleuchtet aber auch das »Machbare« einer materialistischen Bildungstheorie und -praxis.

Edited by Ralf Koerrenz, Friederike von Horn and Friederike von Horn

The Lost Mirror traces cultural patterns in which the interpretation of learning and education was developed against the backdrop of Hebrew thought.

The appreciation of learning is deeply rooted in the Hebrew way of thinking. Learning is understood as an open and history-conscious engagement of man with culture. The consciousness of history is shaped by the motif of the unavailability of the “other” and the difference to this “other”. This “other” is traditionally remembered as “God”, but may also be reflected in the motifs of the other person or the other society. The Lost Mirror reminds us
of a deficit, which is that in our everyday thinking and everyday action, we usually hide, forget and partly suppress the meaning and presence of the unavailable other. The book approaches this thinking through portraits of people such as Hannah Arendt, Leo Baeck, Walter Benjamin, Agnes Heller, Emanuel Levinas, and others.

Collaborative Practical Theology

Engaging Practitioners in Research on Christian Practices

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Henk de Roest

Collaborative Practical Theology documents and analyses research on Christian practices conducted by academic practical theologians in collaboration with practitioners of different kinds in Christian practices all around the world. These practitioners include professional practitioners, everyday believers, volunteers and students in theological education. The book offers rationales for setting up joint investigation groups with different ‘communities of practice’, describes a wide range of collaborative research strategies and methods and also has a clear eye for their limitations. In Christian practices faith is mediated, enacted and nurtured. The aim of the book is to improve the utility of theological research on these practices. It communicates the vision that academic research is for the people of God in today’s world.

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Edited by Cédric Giraud

The ambition of this Companion to Twelfth-Century Schools is to provide an update on the research regarding a question that has seen many renewals in the last three decades. The discovery of new texts, the progress made in critical attribution, the growing attention given to the conditions surrounding the oral and written dissemination of works, the use of the notion of "community of learning”, the reinterpretation of the relations between the cloister and the urban school, the link between institutional history and social history, in short, the entire contemporary renewal of cultural history within international medieval studies allow to offer a new synthesis on the schools of the 12th century. Contributors are: Alexander Andrée, Irene Caiazzo, Cédric Giraud, Frédéric Goubier, Danielle Jacquart, Thierry Kouamé, Constant J. Mews, Ken Pennington, Dominique Poirel, Irène Rosier-Catach, Sita Steckel, Jacques Verger, and Olga Weijers.

Neoliberalism and Academic Repression

The Fall of Academic Freedom in the Era of Trump

Edited by Erik Juergensmeyer, Anthony J. Nocella II and Mark Seis

Neoliberalism and Academic Repression: The Fall of Academic Freedom in the Era of Trump co-edited by Dr’s Erik Juergensmeyer, Anthony J. Nocella II, and Mark Seis provides a theoretical examination of the current higher education system and explains how academia is being shaped into a corporate-factory-industrial-complex. This complex is transforming the relationships within and beyond the institution, transforming the mission of higher education from being the foundation of democracy to manager of professionalism. The outstanding contributors offer strategies of social change, policy suggestions, and important critiques of neoliberal practices. This timely collection challenges the neoliberal emphasis on valuation based on job readiness and outcome achievement—promoting equity, justice, and inclusivity in the process.

Contributors include: Camila Bassi, Brad Benz, A. Peter Castro, Taine Duncan, Sarah Giragosian, Erik Juergensmeyer, Caroline K. Kaltefleiter, Peter Kirstein, Emil Marmol, Anthony J. Nocella II, Ben Ristow, JL Schatz, Mark Seis, Jeff Shantz, Kim Socha, Richard J. White.

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Nikolas Gisborne

In Ten Lectures on Event Structure in a Network Theory of Language, Nikolas Gisborne explores verb meaning. He discusses theories of events and how a network model of language-in-the-mind should be theorized; what the lexicon is; how to probe word meaning; evidence for structure in word meaning; polysemy; the lexical semantics of causation; a type hierarchy of events; and event types cross-linguistically. He also looks at the relationship between different classes of events or event types and aktionsarten; transitivity alternations and argument linking. Gisborne argues that the social and cognitive embedding of language, requires a view of linguistic structure as a network where even the analysis of verb meaning can require an understanding of the role of speaker and hearer.

Ralf Koerrenz

Es gibt eine spezifisch hebräische Kultur der Bildung – das ist der Leitgedanke dieser Grundlegung. In dieser Kultur der Bildung spielt neben Aspekten wie Freiheit und Individualität ein bestimmtes Verständnis der Verantwortung des Menschen gegenüber sich selbst, der Mitwelt und der Umwelt eine entscheidende Rolle.
Dabei wird der Mensch als ein Wesen verstanden, das von der unaufhebbaren Gleichzeitigkeit von Entfremdung (Sünde) und Freiheit (als Befreiung) geprägt ist. Mit »hebräisch« wird dabei ein kultureller Überlieferungskontext bezeichnet, der sich in den Schriften der hebräischen Bibel gebündelt hat. Schöpfung und Sündenfall, Befreiung und prophetische Kulturkritik werden mit Blick auf das Bildungsmotiv anthropologisch ausgedeutet. Insgesamt entfaltet der Hebräische Humanismus nicht nur ein Verständnis von Kultur und Bildung, sondern kann insgesamt als eine bestimmte Ausprägung einer Kultur der Bildung verstanden werden. Der Hebräische Humanismus bildet die gemeinsame Grundlage für entsprechende Strömungen im Judentum, Christentum und Islam.

Euler Renato Westphal

The purpose of this study about theological aspects of culture and social ethics is to investigate the relation between the theological tradition arising from Luther and the cultural immateriality which is culturally expressed in material progress and work.
It is necessary to remember that it was Protestant theology itself that enabled this secularization process. Protestantism and modernity with its secularization proposal are processes that condition one another. Paul Tillich calls modernity and secularization the “Protestant Era” in the context of the Western culture of economic progress. It was mainly the theological tradition of the Enlightenment that separated the kingdom of the right from the kingdom of the left, law and gospel, creation and redemption, in such a way that the scope of creation became so autonomous that it dismissed the justification through the work of Christ, the gospel.

Artistic Mentoring as a Decolonizing Methodology

An Evolving 18-year Collaborative Painting Ethnography with Maya Artists

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Kryssi Staikidis

To expand the possibilities of “doing arts thinking” from a non-Eurocentric view, Artistic Mentoring as a Decolonizing Methodology: An Evolving 18-year Collaborative Painting Ethnography with Maya Artists is grounded in Indigenous perspectives on arts practice, arts research, and art education. Mentored in painting for eighteen years by two Guatemalan Maya artists, Kryssi Staikidis, a North American painter and art education professor, used both Indigenous and decolonizing methodologies, which involve respectful collaboration, and continuously reexamined her positions as student, artist, and ethnographer searching to redefine and transform the roles of the artist as mentor, historian/activist, ethnographer, and teacher.

The primary purpose of the book is to illuminate the Maya artists as mentors, the collaborative and holistic processes underlying their painting, and the teaching and insights from their studios. These include Imagined Realism, a process excluding rendering from observation, and the fusion of pedagogy and curriculum into a holistic paradigm of decentralized teaching, negotiated curriculum, personal and cultural narrative as thematic content, and the surrounding visual culture and community as text.

The Maya artist as cultural historian creates paintings as platforms of protest and vehicles of cultural transmission, for example, genocide witnessed in paintings as historical evidence. The mentored artist as ethnographer cedes the traditional ethnographic authority of the colonizing stance to the Indigenous expert as partner and mentor, and under this mentorship analyzes its possibilities as decolonizing arts-based qualitative inquiry. For the teacher, Maya world views broaden and integrate arts practice and arts research, inaugurating possibilities to transform arts education.