Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 790 items for :

  • Linguistics x
  • Human Rights and Humanitarian Law x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All Modify Search

The Constitutional Identity of Contemporary China

The Unitary System and Its Internal Logic

Series:

Han Zhai

In The Constitutional Identity of Contemporary China: The Unitary System and Its Internal Logic, Han Zhai offers a profound understanding of China’s constitutional history with her account of constitutional identity of multi-layered states in other parts of the world. This book successfully bridges China’s constitutional complex and the emerging common theory of constitutional law with methodological innovations. In constitutional comparison, this work’s treatment of the Kingdoms of Spain and the Netherlands provides effective structural and historical analysis. This book does not only awaken China’s constitutional identity in contemporary scholarship but also presents rich possibilities in the constitutional study and the way we understand a country’s fundamental arrangements in its national context

The European Union Returns Directive and its Compatibility with International Human Rights Law

Analysis of Return Decision, Entry Ban, Detention, and Removal

Series:

Izabella Majcher

The book undertakes a throughout assessment of the EU Returns Directive, and particularly measures on return, re-entry ban, immigration detention, and removal, against international human rights standards. The overarching human rights framework which circumscribes states’ prerogatives in the context of expulsion builds upon obligations derived from the principle of non-refoulement; the right to life, respect for family and private life, effective remedy, basic social services; the prohibition of torture and ill-treatment; and protection against arbitrary detention and collective expulsion. Based on this assessment, Izabella Majcher discusses several protection gaps in the Directive’s provisions which may result in human rights violations and highlights how the Directive’s rules should be complemented to comply with member states' human rights obligations.

Filipino American Transnational Activism

Diasporic Politics In The Second Generation

Series:

Edited by Robyn M. Rodriguez

Filipino American Transnational Activism: Diasporic Politics in the Second Generation offers an account of how Filipinos born or raised in the United States often defy the multiple assimilationist agendas that attempt to shape their understandings of themselves. Despite conditions that might lead them to reject any kind of relationship to the Philippines in favor of a deep rootedness in the United States, many forge linkages to the “homeland” and are actively engaged in activism and social movements transnationally. Though it may well be true that most Filipino Americans have an ambivalent relationship to the Philippines, many of the chapters of this book show that other possibilities for belonging and imaginaries of “home” are being crafted and pursued.

Legislating for Equality

A Multinational Collection of Non-Discrimination Norms. Volume IV: Asia and Oceania

Edited by Talia Naamat, Dina Porat, Elena Pesina and Giovanni Matteo Quer

Pauline Maillet

In Nowhere Countries: Exclusion of Non-citizens from Rights through Extra-territoriality at Home, Pauline Maillet offers a new theoretical framework to understand the mechanisms by which non-citizens are excluded from the rights attached to sovereign territory when arriving at states’ borders.
Initiated in Charles de Gaulle airport, the analysis encompasses similar cases in countries other than France. This multidisciplinary study traces how some liberal democracies create spaces construed as extra-territorial on their own soil to circumvent obligations owed to sea or airborne asylum seekers under the Refugee Convention and its Protocol. How do states make their territory vanish to prevent asylum seekers’ arrival? Using a combination of legal analysis and ethnography, this book identifies the legal techniques, enforcement practices and mental landscapes that have sustained nowhere countries.

Series:

Mary McAleese

In the first study of its kind Mary McAleese subjects to comprehensive scrutiny the Roman Catholic Church’s 1983 Code of Canon law as it applies to children. The Catholic Church is the world’s largest non-governmental organisation involved in the provision of education and care services to children. It has over three hundred million child members world-wide the vast majority of whom became Church members when they were baptised as infants. Canon law sets out their rights and obligations as members. Children also have rights which are set out in the 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child to which the Holy See is State Party. The impact of the Convention on Canon Law is examined in detail and the analysis charts a distinct and worrying sea-change in the attitude of the Holy See to its obligations under the Convention since the clerical sex abuse scandals became a subject of discussion at the Committee on the Rights of the Child, which monitors implementation of the Convention.

Extradition Law

Reviewing Grounds for Refusal from the Classic Paradigm to Mutual Recognition and Beyond

Series:

Miguel João Costa

In Extradition Law, Miguel João Costa offers not only an exhaustive review of this legal area and of transnational criminal law more generally, but also innovative solutions for their reform.
The book critically analyses numerous themes – from international cooperation in criminal matters to substantive criminal law and procedure, from human rights to nationality and refugee law, from public to private international law – at the national, European and global levels. Moreover, while it is a fundamentally normative study, it does not disregard the political and diplomatic dimensions of extradition either.
The result is a new model based on mutual respect, enabling States to increase cooporation whilst preserving the integrity of their own criminal justice values and enhancing the respect for human rights.

Series:

Catherine Harwood

In The Roles and Functions of Atrocity-Related United Nations Commissions of Inquiry in the International Legal Order, Catherine Harwood explores the turn to international law in atrocity-related United Nations commissions of inquiry and their navigation of considerations of principle (the legal) and pragmatism (the political), to discern their identity in the international legal order.
The book traces the inquiry process from establishment and interpretation of the mandate to legal analysis, production of findings and recommendations. The research finds that the turn to international law fundamentally shapes the roles and functions of UN atrocity inquiries. Inquiries continuously navigate between realms of law and politics, with the equilibrium shifting in different moments and contexts.

Series:

Edited by Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

The 2018 Inter-American Yearbook on Human Rights provides an extract of the principal jurisprudence of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. Part One contains the Decisions on the Merits of the Commission, and Part Two the Judgments and Decisions of the Court.

The Yearbook is partly published as an English-Spanish bilingual edition. Some parts are in English or Spanish only. Three volume set.