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Excavations at Tall Jawa, Jordan

Volume 3: The Iron Age Pottery

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Michèle Daviau

In Excavations at Tall Jawa, Jordan: Volume 3, the Iron Age Pottery, Michèle Daviau presents a detailed typology of the Iron Age pottery excavated from 1989–1995. She looks beyond the formal changes to an in-depth analysis of the forming techniques employed to make each type of vessel from bowls to colanders, cooking pots to pithoi. The changes in fabric composition from Iron I to Iron II were more significant than those from Iron IIB to IIC, although changes in surface treatment, especially slip color, were noticeable. Petrographic analysis of Iron I pottery by Klassen contributes to our growing corpus of fabric types, while Epler documents typical Ammonite painted patterns and Kirby and Kraft present a typology of potters’ marks.

Hrozný and Hittite

The First Hundred Years

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Edited by Ronald Kim, Jana Mynářová and Peter Pavúk

This volume collects 33 papers that were presented at the international conference held at the Faculty of Arts, Charles University in November 2015 to celebrate the centenary of Bedřich Hrozný’s identification of Hittite as an Indo-European language. Contributions are grouped into three sections, “Hrozný and His Discoveries,” “Hittite and Indo-European,” and “The Hittites and Their Neighbors,” and span the full range of Hittite studies and related disciplines, from Anatolian and Indo-European linguistics and cuneiform philology to Ancient Near Eastern archaeology, history, and religion. The authors hail from 15 countries and include leading figures as well as emerging scholars in the fields of Hittitology, Indo-European, and Ancient Near Eastern studies.

Excavations at Mendes

Volume 2 The Dromos and Temple Area

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Edited by Donald Bruce Redford and Susan Redford

The second volume of Excavations at Mendes furthers the publication of our archaeological work at the site of Tel er-Rub’a, ancient Mendes, in the east central Delta. Mendes is proving to be one of the most exciting sites in the Nile Delta. Occupied from prehistoric times until the Roman Period, Mendes reveals the nature of a typical Late Egyptian city, its distribution of economy, and demography. The discoveries reported on in this volume were wholly unexpected, and bear meaning fully on Ancient Egyptian history: these include the prosperity and size of the original Old Kingdom city, the major contributions of Ramesses II and Amasis to the monumental nature of the city, and the role of the city in the period c. 600–100 B.C. as an entrepot for Mediterranean trade.

Ľubica Hudáková

In The Representations of Women in the Middle Kingdom Tombs of Officials Ľubica Hudáková offers an in-depth analysis of female iconography in the decorative programme of Middle Kingdom non-royal tombs, highlighting changes and innovations in comparison to the Old Kingdom. Previously considered too uniform, the study represents the first systematic investigation of two-dimensional images of women and reveals their variability in space and time.
Hudáková examines the roles appointed to women by analyzing how they are depicted in a variety of contexts. Taking into account their postures, gestures, garments, hairstyles, size of the body, age as well as attributes and tools used by them, along with the scene orientation, she traces diachronic and diatopic developments and regional traditions in the Middle Kingdom tomb decoration.

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Simone Paturel

The aim of this monograph is to understand the extent to which the landscape of Roman Berytus and the Bekaa valley is a product of colonial transformation following the foundation of Colonia Iulia Augusta Felix Berytus in 15 BCE. The book explores the changes observed in the cities of Berytus and Heliopolis, as well as the sites at Deir el-Qalaa, Niha, and Hosn Niha. The work fundamentally challenges the traditional paradigm, where Baalbek-Heliopolis is seen as a religious site dating from as early as the Bronze Age and associated with the worship of a Semitic or Phoenician deity triad and replaces it with a new perspective where religious activity is largely a product of colonial change.

An Azanian Trio

Three East African Arabic Historical Documents

Edited by James McL. Ritchie and Sigvard von Sicard

This work consists of the translation and annotation of three East African Arabic / Swahili manuscripts together with the original texts. They cover aspects of the history of the coast from the early Himyaritic period up to the beginning of the 20th century. By the use of earlier, in some cases hitherto unused Arabic sources, the authors of the texts have contributed to a fuller picture of the East African coastal history. The texts relate directly to works on East African coastal history that have appeared since the latter part of the 19th century. They are presented against the background of general Arabic and Islamic history. The annotations indicate, and some case stress, significant hints and references to matters that need to be borne in mind, along with archeological and other evidences.

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Edited by Giorgos Papantoniou, Demetrios Michaelides and Maria Dikomitou - Eliadou

Edited by G. Papantoniou, D. Michaelides and M. Dikomitou-Eliadou, Hellenistic and Roman Terracottas is a collection of 29 chapters with an introduction presenting diverse and innovative approaches (archaeological, stylistic, iconographic, functional, contextual, digital, and physicochemical) in the study of ancient terracottas across the Mediterranean and the Near East, from the Hellenistic period to Late Antiquity. The 34 authors advocate collectively the significance of a holistic approach to the study of coroplastic art, which considers terracottas not simply as works of art but, most importantly, as integral components of ancient material culture. The volume will prove to be an invaluable companion to all those interested in ancient terracottas and their associated iconography and technology, as well as in ancient artefacts and classical archaeology in general.

The Manasseh Hill Country Survey Volume 5

The Middle Jordan Valley, from Wadi Fasael to Wadi ‘Aujah

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Adam Zertal Z"l and Shay Bar

The book presents the results of a complete detailed survey of the eastern region of Samaria, mainly the Middle Jordan Valley, within the territory of Israel/Palestine. It is Volume 5 of the Manasseh Hill Country Survey publications. This project, in progress since 1978, and covering 2500 sq. km, is a thorough, metre-by-metre mapping of the archaeological-historical area between the River Jordan and the Sharon Plain, and between Nahal 'Iron and the north-eastern point of the Dead Sea. This territory is one of the most important in the country from the Biblical and archaeological view; and the survey is a valuable tool for scholars of the Bible, archaeology, Near Eastern history and other aspects of the Holy Land.
This volume describes the area of the Jordan Valley between Wadi Fasael in the north and Wadi 'Aujah in the south. It is a fully revised and updated version of the Hebrew publication of 2012.

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Isabelle Tassignon

Abstract

The starting point of our discussion will be a few fragmentary Hellenistic terracotta statuettes from the acropolis of Amathous that depict a woman holding a young child against her shoulder. The type has been interpreted as a variation on the theme of Aphrodite with Eros. However, recent excavations in the storage area of the palace unearthed a limestone statuette of Aphrodite, resting on a column, holding a child. Stone statuette and terracotta fragments seem to evoke the same original. Another work, from the sanctuary, adds to the attempted reconstruction of the original: it is a curious limestone bust of a woman, headless, but in a pose that seems to derive from the same iconographic model.

As we shall see, the analysis of the archaeological contexts of the respective finds suggests close links with the sanctuary of Aphrodite. We propose to place this iconographic type in the overall context of the kourotrophos goddess in Cyprus and thus determine the influence of local traditions on the type. Locally produced for a very special sanctuary, these terracottas have some specific characteristics but are based on a limestone model, which itself adapts a Hellenistic model to local demands. Can the reconstructed image be that of a cult statue coming from the very sanctuary?

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Stéphanie Huysecom-Haxhi

Abstract

We have chosen to study here the naked female figure kneeling in a shell: this is a relatively uncommon theme which is articulated in several types with significant differences in the gestures, ornaments, accessories or companions. Whenever the context is known, it has always to do with sanctuaries of female divinities or graves. Our objective here is to reconsider the interpretation of this image by taking into consideration the different data at our disposal. The main question would not be to establish if they represent Aphrodite or not, but to try to understand the values that the image of a naked female body, emerging from a shell, might well represent, and help explain the presence of this object in this particular context, by or for an individual, at a particular moment of life.1