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Edited by William Gross, Orly Tzion and Falk Wiesemann

Catalog of Catalogs provides a comprehensive index of nearly 2,300 publications documenting the exhibition of Judaica over the past 140 years. This vast corpus of material, ranging from simple leaflets to scholarly catalogs, contains textual and visual material as yet unmined for the study of Jewish art, religion, culture and history.

Through highly-detailed, fully-indexed catalog entries, William Gross, Orly Tzion and Falk Wiesemann elucidate some 2,000 subjects, geographical locations and Judaica objects (ceremonial objects, illuminated manuscripts, printed books, synagogues, cemeteries et al.) addressed in these catalogs. Descriptions of the catalog's bibliographic components, contributors, exhibition history, and contents, all accessible through the volume's five indices, render this volume an unparalleled new resource for the study of Jewish Art, culture and history.

VIII-1 Ordinis octavi tomus primus

Textus ad patres ecclesiae

Series:

C.S.M. (Cor) Rademaker SSCC, Aza Goudriaan, André Godin, Silvana Seidel Menchi, Claudia Ricci and Anna Morisi Guerra

This volume in the ASD series (VIII, 1) publishes texts by Erasmus related to the Fathers of the Church. He himself considered this one of his major contributions to Christianity and the Church. He edited many Fathers and wrote Vitae of three theologians: John Chrysostom, Origen and, his most important one, Jerome. He gives a portrait of the theologians and his view on them, but also a kind of self-portrait. He also forged a text himself: ‘Cyprian’s De duplici martyrio’. His many editions of the Church Fathers and other theologians contain prefaces which provide us with information about the theologians, and with remarks on Erasmus’ view on them. Thus, we get a clearer view of Erasmus and his theology.

Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2018 / Bibliographie Linguistique de l’année 2018

and Supplement for Previous Years / et complement des années précédentes

Series:

Edited by Anne Aarssen, René Genis and Eline van der Veken

The Linguistic Bibliography / Bibliographie Linguistique is the annual bibliography of theoretical linguistics published by the Permanent International Committee of Linguists under the auspices of the International Council of Philosophy and Humanistic Studies of UNESCO. With a tradition of over sixty-five years, the Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. It covers all disciplines of theoretical linguistics, both general and language specific, from all geographical areas, including endangered and extinct languages with particular attention to lesser-known Indo-European and non-Indo-European languages. Up-to-date information is guaranteed by the collaboration of some forty-five contributing specialists from all over the world. With over 20,000 titles arranged according to a subject and language classification, the Linguistic Bibliography is a standard reference work for every scholar of language and linguistics. This volume has been brought up-to-date and contains extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.

Edited by Christian Erbacher

Every student of the twentieth century has heard both of the great Viennese economist Friedrich von Hayek and of the equally great philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. But what isn’t well known is that the two were distant cousins and that, shortly after Wittgenstein’s death in 1951, Hayek set out to write a biography of his cousin. The project was derailed by Wittgenstein family members, who felt it was to soon to publish such a work. But Hayek’s draft acquired an underground readership, and Wittgenstein’s biographers have used it extensively.
Here finally, is the text of that work itself. Hayek’s account has the great merit of being close to its subject; the draft, moreover sheds light, not only on Wittgenstein but on Hayek as well. Allan Janik’s elegant afterword makes these links clear. Anyone interested in Wittgenstein or, for that matter, in the thought and culture of the earlier twentieth century, will want to read Christian Erbacher’s excellent edition of Hayek’s draft biography. – Marjorie Perloff

Series:

Edited by James H. Brusuelas, Dirk Obbink and Stefan Schorn

This volume is part of the continuation of Felix Jacoby’s monumental collection of fragmentary Greek historiography. It contains new critical editions of the anonymous Greek papyri with biographical content with English translation and extensive commentaries. The papyri concern the lives of politicians, rhetoricians, kings, poets and philosophers. These texts show that there was a wider variety of forms of biographical writing in Greek antiquity than is attested by the preserved works and they contribute significantly to our knowledge of the development of this literary genre. The commentaries provide many new insights into the development of biographical traditions in antiquity.

Supplementum Grammaticum Graecum 1

Antidorus, Dionysius Iambus, Epigenes, Lysanias, Parmenon, Silenus, Simaristus, Simmias

Series:

Emanuele Dettori

Edited by Franco Montanari, Fausto Montana and Lara Pagani

SGG 1 offers the first critical edition of, and commentaries on, the textual fragments of the ancient Greek grammarians Antidorus, Dionysius Iambus, Epigenes, Lysanias, Parmenon, Silenus, Simaristus, and Sim(m)ias. All of these personalities belong, or so plausibly appear, to the early Hellenistic period (3rd-2nd centuries BC) and share a special interest in glossographical issues (mainly discussions of problems concerning lexical usages and customs, in Greek literature as well as in ordinary life of their times) and/or in literary history. Each entry includes: a biographical and cultural profile of the grammarian; the text of testimonies and fragments critically edited, translated, and analytically commented on; a thorough bibliography; and indices.

Gerrit Bos

The terminology in medieval Hebrew medical literature (original works and translations) has been sorely neglected by modern research. Medical terminology is virtually missing from the standard dictionaries of the Hebrew language, including Ha-Millon he-ḥadash, composed by Abraham Even-Shoshan. Ben-Yehuda’s dictionary is the only one that contains a significant number of medical terms. Unfortunately, Ben-Yehuda’s use of the medieval medical texts listed in the dictionary’s introduction is inconsistent at best. The only dictionary exclusively devoted to medical terms, both medieval and modern, is that by A.M. Masie, entitled Dictionary of Medicine and Allied Sciences. However, like the dictionary by Ben-Yehuda, it only makes occasional use of the sources registered in the introduction and only rarely differentiates between the various medieval translators. Further, since Masie’s work is alphabetized according to the Latin or English term, it cannot be consulted for Hebrew terms. The Historical Dictionary of the Hebrew Language, which is currently being created by the Academy of the Hebrew Language, has not been taken into account consistently as it is not a dictionary in the proper sense of the word. Moreover, consultation of this resource suggests that it is generally deficient in medieval medical terminology. The Bar Ilan Responsa Project has also been excluded as a source, despite the fact that it contains a larger number of medieval medical terms than the Historical Dictionary. The present dictionary has two major objectives: 1) to map the medical terminology featured in medieval Hebrew medical works, in order to facilitate study of medical terms, especially those terms that do not appear in the existing dictionaries, and terms that are inadequately represented. 2) to identify the medical terminology used by specific authors and translators, to enable the identification of anonymous medical material.

Themistius’ Paraphrase of Aristotle’s Metaphysics 12

A Critical Hebrew-Arabic Edition of the Surviving Textual Evidence, with an Introduction, Preliminary Studies, and a Commentary

Series:

Yoav Meyrav

Themistius’ (4th century CE) paraphrase of Aristotle’s Metaphysics 12 is the earliest surviving complete account of this seminal work. Despite leaving no identifiable mark in Late Antiquity, Themistius’ paraphrase played a dramatic role in shaping the metaphysical landscape of Medieval Arabic and Hebrew philosophy and theology. Lost in Greek, and only partially surviving in Arabic, its earliest full version is in the form of a 13th century Hebrew translation. In this volume, Yoav Meyrav offers a new critical edition of the Hebrew translation and the Arabic fragments of Themistius’ paraphrase, accompanied by detailed philological and philosophical analyses. In doing so, he provides a solid foundation for the study of one of the most important texts in the history of Aristotelian metaphysics.

Encyclopedia of Early Modern History, volume 7

(Industrial Cycle – Latin Studies)

Series:

Edited by Andrew Colin Gow

The Encyclopedia of Early Modern History offers 400 years of early modern history in one work. Experts from all over the world have joined in a presentation of the scholarship on the great era between the mid-15th to the mid-19th centuries. The perspective is European. That does not mean, however, that the view on the rest of the world is blocked. On the contrary: the multifaceted interrelatedness of European and other cultures is scrutinized extensively.

The Encyclopedia of Early Modern History addresses major historical questions:
- which ideas, inventions, and events changed people’s lives?
- in which ways did living conditions change?
- how do political, social, and economic developments interlock?
- which major cultural currents have begun to become apparent?
- how did historical interpretation of certain phenomena change?
The individual articles are connected to one another as in a web of red threads. The reader who follows the threads will keep coming upon new
and unexpected contexts and links.

Maimonides, On the Elucidation of Some Symptoms and the Response to Them (Formerly Known as On the Causes of Symptoms)

A New Parallel Arabic-English Edition and Translation, with Critical Editions of the Medieval Hebrew Translations

Series:

Gerrit Bos

The present consilium, commonly known as De causis accidentium, after the Latin translation by John de Capua, was, like the earlier consilium On the Regimen of Health, composed by Maimonides at the request of al-Malik al-Afḍal Nūr al-Dīn Alī, Saladin’s eldest son. As a result of not adopting the lifestyle and dietary recommendations in On the Regimen of Health, al-Afḍal may have continued to suffer from a number of afflictions, amongst them hemorrhoids, depression, constipation, and, possibly, a heart condition. The consilium was written after 1200, the year in which al-Afḍal was deposed and banished from Egypt permanently, but probably not long before 1204, the year in which Maimonides died.