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Ottoman-Southeast Asian Relations (2 vols.)

Sources from the Ottoman Archives

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Ismail Hakkı Kadı and A.C.S. Peacock

Ottoman-Southeast Asian Relations: Sources from the Ottoman Archives, is a product of meticulous study of İsmail Hakkı Kadı, A.C.S. Peacock and other contributors on historical documents from the Ottoman archives. The work contains documents in Ottoman-Turkish, Malay, Arabic, French, English, Tausung, Burmese and Thai languages, each introduced by an expert in the language and history of the related country. The work contains documents hitherto unknown to historians as well as others that have been unearthed before but remained confined to the use of limited scholars who had access to the Ottoman archives. The resources published in this study show that the Ottoman Empire was an active actor within the context of Southeast Asian experience with Western colonialism. The fact that the extensive literature on this experience made limited use of Ottoman source materials indicates the crucial importance of this publication for future innovative research in the field.

Contributors are: Giancarlo Casale, Annabel Teh Gallop, Rıfat Günalan, Patricia Herbert, Jana Igunma, Midori Kawashima, Abraham Sakili and Michael Talbot

A Literary History of Medicine- The ʿUyūn al-anbāʾ fī ṭabaqāt al-aṭibbāʾ of Ibn Abī Uṣaybiʿah (5 Volumes)

Volume I: Essays
Volume 2-1: Arabic Edition
Volume 2-2;
Arabic Edition
Volume 3-1: Annotated English Translation
Volume 3-2: Annotated English Translation, Appendices and Indices

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Edited by Emilie Savage-Smith, Simon Swain and Geert Jan van Gelder

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Edited by Falko Daim

This compendium examines the history and culture of the Byzantine world from the foundation of Constantinople (324) to the Ottoman conquest of the city, which brought the final downfall of the Byzantine Empire (1453). A detailed 100-page introduction is followed by discussion of 15 key topics, including politics and government, people and society, legislation and legal practice, the army and navy, church and religion, nature and the environment, art and architecture, languages, literature, education and culture, medicine and music. Because the work forms part of Brill's New Pauly, particular attention is paid to aspects of continuity with the ancient world, and of innovation.

Al-Maqrīzī’s al-Ḫabar ʿan al-bašar

Vol. V, Sections 1-2: The Arab Thieves

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Edited by Peter Webb

In The Arab Thieves, Peter Webb critically explores the classic tales of pre-Islamic Arabian outlaws in Arabic Literature. A group of Arabian camel-rustlers became celebrated figures in Muslim memories of pre-Islam, and much poetry ascribed to them and stories about their escapades grew into an outlaw tradition cited across Arabic literature. The ninth/fifteenth-century Egyptian historian al-Maqrīzī arranged biographies of ten outlaws into a chapter on ‘Arab Thieves’ in his wide-ranging history of the world before Muhammad. This volume presents the first critical edition of al-Maqrīzī’s text with a fully annotated English translation, alongside a detailed study that interrogates the outlaw lore to uncover the ways in which Arabic writers constructed outlaw identities and how al-Maqrīzī used the tales to communicate his vision of pre-Islam. Via an exhaustive survey of early Arabic sources about the outlaws and comparative readings with outlaw traditions in other world literatures, The Arab Thieves reveals how Arabic literature crafted lurid narratives about criminality and employed them to tell ancient Arab history.

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George Dimitri Sawa

The present volume consists of translated anecdotes, on musicological and socio-cultural topics, from al-Iṣbahānī’s Kitāb al-Aghānī al-Kabīr ( The Grand Book of Songs) with annotations and commentaries. It deals with musical rhythmic and melodic modes, technical terms and treatises; music instruments; composition techniques and processes; education and oral/written transmissions; vocal and instrumental performances and their aesthetics; solo and ensemble music; change and its inevitability; musical and textual improvisations; ṭarab and the acute emotions of joy or grief; medieval dances; social status. Though extracts from The Grand Book of Songs have been translated in European languages since 1816, this work presents a much larger and more comprehensive scope that will benefit musicologists, medievalist and Middle Eastern scholars as well as the general reader.

Warrior Saints of the Silk Road

Legends of the Qarakhanids

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Jeff Eden

For generations, Central Asian Muslims have told legends of medieval rulers who waged war, died in battle, and achieved sainthood. Among the Uyghurs of East Turkistan (present-day Xinjiang, China), some of the most beloved legends tell of the warrior-saint Satuq Bughra Khan and his descendants, the rulers of the Qarakhanid dynasty. To this day, these tales are recited at the saints' shrines and retold on any occasion.
Warrior Saints of the Silk Road introduces this rich literary tradition, presenting the first complete English translation of the Qarakhanid narrative cycle along with an accessible commentary. At once mesmerizing, moving, and disturbing, these legends are essential texts in Central Asia's religious heritage as well as fine, enduring works of mystical literature.

The Orientalist Karl Süssheim Meets the Young Turk Officer İsma’il Hakkı Bey

Two Unexplored Sources from the Last Decade in the Reign of the Ottoman Sultan Abdulhamid II

Jan Schmidt

The book consists of transcriptions and summary translations of two texts in, mostly, Ottoman Turkish, the first of which is the recently discovered second volume of the diary of the German orientalist Karl Süssheim, covering the years 1903-08 which he mostly spent in Istanbul. The second text is a printed memoir of a Young Turk officer called İsma’il Hakkı, in which the latter discusses his life, political engagement and the resulting problems. Süssheim met İsma’il Hakkı in Cairo in 1908 and kept in contact with him later. The texts offer a lively picture of Istanbul and Cairo in the early years of the 20th century, the repressive regime of Sultan Abdulhamid II and the heady days of the Young Turk revolution of July 1908.

The History (Taʾrikh) by Ibn Wāḍiḥ al-Yaʿqūbī

Ibn Wāḍiḥ Qui Dicitur al-Yaʿqūbī, Historiae Vol. 1

M. Th. Houtsma

Abū al-ʿAbbās al-Yaʿqūbī was a Muslim imperial official and polymath of the third/ninth century. On the occasion of the publication of The Works of Ibn Wāḍiḥ al-Yaʿqūbī. An English translation, edited by Matthew S. Gordon, Chase F. Robinson, Everett K. Rowson, and Michael Fishbein (Leiden, 2017-2018), Brill is making the classic Arabic edition of al-Yaʿqūbī’s Taʾrīkh by M.Th. Houtsma (2 vols., 1883) available in paperback for the first time.

Volume 1 covers Pre-Islamic history, from Adam and Eve to the Patriarchs and Prophets of ancient Israel; Jesus and the Apostles; Assyria, Babylonia, and India; the Greek and Persian Empires; a variety of other regions including China and Ethiopia; and a section on the pre-Islamic Arabs. The current volume offers the Arabic text only. The English translation is found in vol. 2 of The Works of Ibn Wāḍiḥ al-Yaʿqūbī.

Johann Michael Wansleben's Travels in the Levant, 1671-1674

An Annotated Edition of His Italian Report

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Edited by Alastair Hamilton

Johann Michael Wansleben’s Travels in the Levant, 1671–1674 is a hitherto unpublished version of a remarkable description of Egypt and the Levant by the German scholar traveller Wansleben, or Vansleb (as he was known in France). He set out for the East in 1671 to collect
manuscripts and antiquities for the French king and also produced the best study of the Copts to have appeared to date. This book recounts his travels in Syria, Turkey and Egypt, his everyday life in Cairo, and his anthropological and archeological discoveries which include the Graeco-Roman Ǧabbārī cemetery in Alexandria, the Roman city of Antinopolis on the Nile, the Coptic monastery of St Anthony on the Red Sea and the Red and White monasteries in Upper Egypt.

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Edited by Jaakko Hämeen-Anttila

Al-Maqrīzī's (d. 845/1442) last work, al-Ḫabar ʿan al-bašar, was completed a year before his death. This volume, edited by Jaakko Hämeen-Anttila, covers the history of pre-Islamic Iran from the Creation to the Parthians. Al-Maqrīzī's work shows how Arab historians integrated Iran into world history and how they harmonized various currents of historiography (Middle Persian historiography, Islamic sacred history, Greek and Latin historiography).

Among al-Ḫabar's sources is Kitāb Hurūšiyūš, the Arabic translation of Paulus Orosius' Historiarum adversum paganos libri vii. This source has only been preserved in one defective copy, and al-Maqrīzī's text helps to fill in some of its lacunae.