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With this volume, the Baltic Yearbook of International Law celebrates the centenary of the three Baltic States: Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. The editors of the Yearbook launched a call for papers on a theme: the Baltic States and International Law. The volume contains a selection of articles examining diverse issues and it is no surprise that the history of statehood and international law are closely intertwined in the case of the Baltic States.

It is highly symbolic that the Baltic Yearbook of International Law, having been founded and hosted for many years by the Raoul Wallenberg Institute at Lund University in Sweden, has now, from 2018, come home and has taken up residence at the Riga Graduate School of Law (RGSL) in Latvia, in the very heart of the three Baltic States.

Among the selected authors, the Yearbook is glad to continue to introduce new authors from the region.

The Baltic Yearbook of International Law is the first legal journal in the field and sub fields of international law published under the auspices of the Baltic Editorial Board that attempts to bring to the international debate issues that are of importance in the Baltic States, providing a forum for the views on topical international-law themes from Baltic and international scholars. The first volume appeared in 2001 with a symposium on the question of the international legal status of the Baltic States. The Yearbook contains State practice reports from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, thus serving as an important source of international law that is unavailable elsewhere. From time to time the Yearbook has offered articles discussing the history of international law and current issues in Eastern Europe and the Russian Federation, thus making regional discourse more accessible to a wider global audience.

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Edited by Faustina Pereira, Shahnaz Huda and Sara Hossain

The People’s Republic of Bangladesh is centrally located in South Asia and is one of the eight countries that constitute the South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation (SAARC). In 2010, the South Asian Institute of Legal and Human Rights Studies in Dhaka (SAILS) initiated the ‘Combating Gender Injustice’ research study to investigate how the Christian, Hindu and Muslim communities in the country are affected by the laws and customs governing their personal lives. The aim was to engage in a dialogue with the stakeholders the results of which would provide a basis to formulate recommendations for law, policy and procedural reform. These reports have been reproduced in this volume in updated and revised form. Moreover, in order to offer a more complete overview of the ethnic and religious minorities concerned, a chapter has been added on the personal laws of the Buddhist community, the third largest religious community in Bangladesh. Finally, the volume offers much needed information on the laws and customs of the indigenous peoples of the Chittagong Hill Tracts, communities following traditional rules and customs in the remote and hilly region of the country. The gender-insensitive personal laws prevalent in South Asian societies will continue to be debated for generations to come. This unique volume gives a voice to the different religious and ethnic communities affected by the current laws and practices in force in Bangladesh. The reader will find an overview and gain understanding of the legal issues that need to be addressed in each case.

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Edited by Pavel Šturma

The Rome Statute of the ICC at its Twentieth Anniversary (Achievements and Perspectives) is an edited book comprising of 13 chapters written by contributors to a conference dedicated to discuss the development, achievements and possible future evolution of the Rome Statute and international criminal law. The authors include academics from various legal systems, practitioners from the ICC and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, attorneys and other law experts.

The International Criminal Court is the first universal international criminal tribunal. Though quite new, as the Rome Statute was adopted 20 years ago (1998) and only 16 years have passed since its entry into force, it has already developed interesting case-law and continues to elaborate on both substantive and procedural international criminal law.

Contributors are Ivana Hrdličková, Claus Kreß, Tamás Lattmann, Jan Lhotský, Milan Lipovský, Iryna Marchuk, Josef Mrázek, Anna Richterová, Simon De Smet, Ondřej Svaček, Pavel Šturma, Kateřina Uhlířová, Kristýna Urbanová, Aloka Wanigasuriya.

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Edited by Vladislava Stoyanova and Eleni Karageorgiou

Understanding the realities of protection in a Europe that had failed to manage the crisis in asylum that unfolded in 2015 and 2016 requires a comprehension of how law shapes and distorts refugee protection practices in frontline states. In this collection Vladislava Stoyanova and Eleni Karageorgiou provide an essential cartography of the state of asylum during the crisis. The volume captures four dynamics: the absorption of EU norms in Central and South Eastern Europe; the reaction in this region to the massive movement of asylum seekers in 2015 and 2016; the initiation of normative developments in the area of asylum during and beyond the crisis by the countries in this region; and the question of solidarity.

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Caleb H. Wheeler

In The Right to Be Present at Trial in International Criminal Law Caleb H. Wheeler analyses what it means for the accused to be present during international criminal trials and how that meaning has changed. This book also examines the impact that absence from trial can have on the fair trial rights of the accused and whether those rights can be upheld outside of the accused’s presence. Using primary and secondary sources, Caleb Wheeler has identified four different categories of absence and how each affects the right to be present. This permits a more nuanced understanding of how the right to be present is understood in international criminal law and how it may develop in the future.

Kushtrim Istrefi

In European Judicial Responses to Security Council Resolutions: A Consequentialist Assessment, Kushtrim Istrefi examines the multiple effects of European courts decisions as regards Security Council targeted sanctions and security detentions interfering with fundamental rights. He elaborates what type of judicial responses ensured real and practical respect for human rights for the petitioners, encouraged Security Council due process reform, clarified Security Council authorisations on security detentions, and tested the primacy and universal character of the UN Charter.
Making use of legal and non-legal instruments, Istrefi sheds some light upon what happened to, among others, petitioners, the SC due process reform agenda, and the UN Charter after such cases as Kadi, Al-Jedda, Ahmed, Al-Dulimi.

High Seas Governance

Gaps and Challenges

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Edited by Robert C. Beckman, Millicent McCreath, J. Ashley Roach and Zhen Sun

High Seas Governance: Gaps and Challenges identifies gaps and challenges to the existing legal regime in the protection and preservation of the marine environment of the high seas, including sensitive marine areas. The gaps identified in the book include the failure of liability and compensation schemes to cover pollution of the high seas and the fact that no state has the responsibility to clean up pollution of the high seas. One common theme of the book is that it is necessary to identify a state other than flag states, port states or coastal states, which should have an obligation to exercise jurisdiction and control over certain activities on the high seas.

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Edited by Martin Lau and Faris Nasrallah

The Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law (YIMEL) is the leading English language journal covering contemporary Islamic laws and laws of the Middle East. Practitioners and academics dealing with the Middle East can turn to YIMEL for an instant source of information on the developments in the Middle East region and wider Muslim world. YIMEL covers Islamic and non-Islamic legal subjects, including the laws themselves, of some twenty Arab and other Islamic countries. Focusing on YIMEL's role in publishing and disseminating ground-breaking and novel research on Islamic law, Volume 19 includes a Special Edition on the theme of Islamic Law and Empire consisting of a dedicated Preface and articles in Part I, as well as other contributions on legal developments in the Middle East and South Asia, important judgements and book reviews, assembled in Part II.

The publication's practical features include: - articles on current topics, - the text of a selection of important case judgments, - book reviews. Please click here for the online version including the abstracts of the articles of The Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law.

How High the Sky?

The Definition and Delimitation of Outer Space and Territorial Airspace in International Law

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Thomas Gangale

In How High the Sky?, jurist Thomas Gangale explores the oldest and most important controversy in space law: how far up does national airspace go, and where does the international environment of outer space begin? Even though nations did not object to the first satellites flying over their sovereign territory, after more than six decades there is still no international agreement on how low the right of space object overflight extends, nor are there agreed legal definitions of “space object” and “space activity.” Dr. Gangale brings his background as an aerospace engineer to bear in exploding long-held beliefs of the legal community, and he offers a draft international convention to settle the oldest and most intractable problems in space law.

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Académie de Droit International de la Ha

Les tribunaux internationaux et leur mission commune de réalisation de la justice : développements, état actuel et perspectives, Conférence spéciale (2017), par A. A. CANÇADO TRINDADE, juge à la Cour internationale de Justice;

The Prohibition of Torture in Public International Law, by F. M. MARIÑO MENÉNDEZ, Professor at the University Carlos III of Madrid;

Effets pour l’individu des régimes de protection de droit international, par C. SWINARSKI, professeur et consultant indépendant en droit international;

L’éthique du procès international, leçon inaugurale, par J.-P. COT, professeur émérite de l’Université Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne).