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Series:

Greta Van Buylaere and Mikko Luukko

Among the most important sources for understanding the cultures and systems of thought of ancient Mesopotamia is a large body of magical and medical texts written in the Sumerian and Akkadian languages. An especially significant branch of this literature centres upon witchcraft. Mesopotamian anti-witchcraft rituals and incantations attribute ill-health and misfortune to the magic machinations of witches and prescribe ceremonies, devices, and treatments for dispelling witchcraft, destroying the witch, and protecting and curing the patient. The Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-Witchcraft Rituals aims to present a reconstruction of this body of texts; it provides critical editions of the relevant rituals and prescriptions based on the study of the cuneiform tablets and fragments recovered from the libraries of ancient Mesopotamia.

Series:

Edited by Natasha Constantinidou and Han Lamers

This volume, edited by Natasha Constantinidou and Han Lamers, investigates modes of receiving and responding to Greeks, Greece, and Greek in early modern Europe (15th-17th centuries). The book's 17 detailed studies illuminate the reception of Greek culture (the classical, Byzantine, and even post-Byzantine traditions), the Greek language (ancient, vernacular, and 'humanist'), as well as the people claiming, or being assigned, Greek identities during this period in different geographical and cultural contexts.
Discussing subjects as diverse as, for example, Greek studies and the Reformation, artistic interchange between Greek East and Latin West, networks of communication in the Greek diaspora, and the ramifications of Greek antiquarianism, the book aims at encouraging a more concerted debate about the role of Hellenism in early modern Europe that goes beyond disciplinary boundaries, and opening ways towards a more over-arching understanding of this multifaceted cultural phenomenon.

Contributors include Aslıhan Akışık-Karakullukçu, Michele Bacci, Malika Bastin-Hammou, Peter Bell, Michail Chatzidakis, Federica Ciccolella, Calliope Dourou, Anthony Ellis, Niccolò Fattori, Maria Luisa Napolitano, Janika Päll, Luigi-Alberto Sanchi, Niketas Siniossoglou, William Stenhouse, Paola Tomè, Raf Van Rooy, and Stefan Weise

Why Look at Plants?

The Botanical Emergence in Contemporary Art

Series:

Edited by Giovanni Aloi

Why Look at Plants? proposes a thought-provoking and fascinating look into the emerging cultural politics of plant-presence in contemporary art. Through the original contributions of artists, scholars, and curators who have creatively engaged with the ultimate otherness of plants in their work, this volume maps and problematizes new intra-active, agential interconnectedness involving human-non-human biosystems central to artistic and philosophical discourses of the Anthropocene.

Plant’s fixity, perceived passivity, and resilient silence have relegated the vegetal world to the cultural background of human civilization. However, the recent emergence of plants in the gallery space constitutes a wake-up-call to reappraise this relationship at a time of deep ecological and ontological crisis. Why Look at Plants? challenges readers’ pre-established notions through a diverse gathering of insights, stories, experiences, perspectives, and arguments encompassing multiple disciplines, media, and methodologies.

Being a Teacher | Researcher

A Primer on Doing Authentic Inquiry Research on Teaching and Learning

Series:

Konstantinos Alexakos

Using a sociocultural approach to critical action research, this book is a primer in doing reflexive, authentic inquiry research in teaching and learning for educators as teacher | researchers. Rather than the artificial dichotomy between theory and practice, the roles of teacher and researcher are instead seen in a dialectic relationship (indicated by the symbol “|” in teacher | researcher) in which each informs and mediates the other in the process of revising and generating new knowledge that is of benefit to those being researched.
In addition to providing a theoretical foundation for authentic inquiry, Being a Teacher | Researcher provides a detailed framework with ideas and strategies that interested educators can apply in exploring teaching and learning in both formal and informal settings. It provides concrete examples of how to use authentic inquiry as a basis for collaborating with others to improve the quality of teaching and learning while cogenerating new theory and associated practices that bridge what has been described as a theory-practice divide. Included in this book are how to plan and carry out authentic inquiry studies, choosing appropriate methodologies, methods of data collection and analysis, negotiating research with human participants, using authenticity criteria and characteristics, and addressing challenges and conflicts for teacher | researchers.

An Eleventh-Century Egyptian Guide to the Universe

The Book of Curiosities, Edited with an Annotated Translation

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Edited by Emilie Savage-Smith and Yossef Rapoport

Acquired by the Bodleian Library in 2002, the Book of Curiosities is now recognized as one of the most important discoveries in the history of cartography in recent decades. This eleventh-century Arabic treatise, composed in Egypt under the Fatimid caliphs, is a detailed account of the heavens and the Earth, illustrated by an unparalleled series of maps and astronomical diagrams. With topics ranging from comets to the island of Sicily, from lunar mansions to the sources of the Nile, it represents the extent of geographical, astronomical and astrological knowledge of the time. This authoritative edition and translation, accompanied by a colour facsimile reproduction, opens a unique window onto the worldview of medieval Islam.

An extensive glossary of star-names and seven indices, on birds, animals and other items have been added for easy reference.

Series:

Edited by David Thomas and Alexander Mallett

Christian-Muslim Relations, a Bibliographical History 5 (CMR 5), covering the period 1350-1500, is a continuing volume in a general history of relations between the two faiths from the seventh century to 1900. It comprises a series of introductory essays and also the main body of detailed entries which treat all the works, surviving or lost, that have been recorded. These entries provide biographical details of the authors, descriptions and assessments of the works themselves, and complete accounts of manuscripts, editions, translations and studies. The result of collaboration between numerous leading scholars, CMR 5, along with the other volumes in this series, is intended as an indispensable tool for research in Christian-Muslim relations.

Aquatic Oligochaeta of the Netherlands and Belgium

Identification Key to the Oligochaetes

Ton van Haaren and Jan Soors

Bristle worms, or oligochaetes, are a large and diverse group of invertebrates. Most oligochaetes living in this region live in fresh or brackish water: no fewer than 136 species in total. They play an important ecological role thereby giving much information about the condition of the ecosystem.

This important, bulky book is the first reference work on the freshwater and brackish water polychaetes in the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany. It offers a wealth of ecological and taxonomic background information.

Includes a new user determination key. The key is based on characteristics that are relatively easy to distinguish, without specialized equipment.

• a comprehensive overview on morphology, collecting and preservation, identification and ecology
• 136 species including the oligochaete fauna of Germany
• a new, practical key for the identification based on characteristics that are relatively easy to distinguish
• many photographs and schematic drawings
• backgroundinformation on ecology and distribution

An unique tool for aquatic ecologists and water quality management.

Coexistence, Cooperation and Solidarity (2 vols.)

Liber Amicorum Rüdiger Wolfrum

Edited by Holger P. Hestermeyer, Doris König, Nele Matz-Lück, Volker Röben, Anja Seibert-Fohr, Peter-Tobias Stoll and Silja Vöneky

This Liber Amicorum, dedicated to Judge Rüdiger Wolfrum of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, highlights paradigmatic changes in international law, a body of law which moved during the 20th century from a law of coexistence to one of cooperation and which is now about to reflect notions of solidarity going even beyond cooperative undertakings. This leitmotif of Rüdiger Wolfrum’s academic research and judgeship is represented in a comprehensive collection of essays by eminent scholars and practitioners of international law covering specific aspects of international law, including law of the sea, human rights, international environmental law, international dispute settlement, peace and security, global governance and domestic law. With its multifaceted and comprehensive overview of the evolution of international law in recent years and detailed study of current challenges this collection is a unique source of insight for all those interested in this fascinating field of law.

Creating Destruction

Constructing Images of Violence and Genocide

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Edited by Nancy Billias and Leonhard Praeg

This volume offers new and fascinating insights into some of the most urgent and relevant dimensions of violence in our time. Specialists from a broad range of disciplines explore some of the reasons and ways in which humans choose to harm one another. The two sections of the book engage a common theme, namely how ideological constructions influence, facilitate, and shape the understanding of our own involvement in violence. Whilst the first section focuses on one specific form of violence, namely genocide, the second explores our construction of violent images: verbally, visually, aurally, legally, socially, imaginally. This book should be required reading for anyone who wants to understand the multi-faceted and complex dimensions of violence in our contemporary, global world.

Analyzing Communication

Praxis of Method

Series:

Wolff-Michael Roth and Pei-Ling Hsu

The collection of data sources in the social sciences involves communication in one form or another: between research participants who are observed while communicating or between researcher and researched, who communicate so that the former can learn about/from the latter. How does one analyze communication? In particular, how does one learn to analyze data sources established in and about communication? In response to these questions, the authors provide insights into the "laboratory" of social science research concerned with the analysis of communication in all of its forms, including language, gestures, images, and prosody. Writing in the spirit of Bourdieu, and his recommendations for the transmission of a scientific habitus, the authors allow readers to follow their social science research in the making. Thus, each chapter focuses on a particular topic-identity, motivation, knowing, interaction-and exhibits how to go about researching it: How to set up research projects, how to collect data sources, how to find research questions, and how to do many other practical things to succeed. The authors comment on excerpts from the findings of between 2 and 4 published studies to describe how to write and publish research, how to address audiences, which decisions they have made, which alternative approaches there might exist, and many other useful recommendations for data analysis and paper publishing. In the end, the authors actually follow an expert social scientist as he analyzes data in real time in front of an audience of graduate students. The entire book therefore constitutes something like a journey into the kitchen of an experienced chef who gives advice in the process of cooking.